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    Leukemia, how did you survive?

    Asked by WhatNextEmails on Monday, March 11, 2013

    Leukemia, how did you survive?

    We need your help. This month we are putting together a collection of articles for those newly diagnosed on what actions survivors took to beat their specific type of cancer. Please take a few minutes to share your experiences and advice for those newly diagnosed, and your posts might just get included in our articles. Feel free to share whatever comes to mind. Here are some more specific questions to help get the juices going: What kind of support did you have? Were there things you did that really made a difference? How do you go about finding your medical care team? Who made up your team? What resources did you find that were most helpful to you?

    5 Answers from the Community

    5 answers
    • ter303's Avatar
      ter303

      I kind of went into my treatment blinded. MDS turned Leukemia. I totally trusted my doctors. Followed all their orders to the tee. Took it one day at a time. That was the only way I could do it. It was so hard being away from my husband, kids and home. It was to hard on me to think about what next. No pun intended. So one day at a time. I had a wonderful support group. Family, friends. They helped more than they will ever know. I tried to appreciate every little thing. Always looked on the bright side. There was always something good about my treatment.

      over 4 years ago
    • LisaLathrop's Avatar
      LisaLathrop

      I am a 4+ year AML Survivor. Diagnosed in 2008, I was sent by my insurance company to the exemplary University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, NE....a leukemia/lymphoma research facility. As I met my Team of oncologists (yes, more than 1), PAs, and extremely caring nurses and techs, I trusted them from the start. My treatment included a LOT of chemo therapy - of all colors, too. and especially a BMT from my sister who was a 100% match. I have always been a "glass half full" gal...and an elementary art teacher prior to diagnosis. Soon I was getting packages at least every other day of artwork, cards and letters from the students and teachers I had worked with. My walls were lined with EVERYTHING! My husband and primary caregiver began a CaringBridge website....so that we wouldn't get worn out by speaking to all our family and friends with all the latest news of my progress. Daily he posted for me...and daily he read messages from family, friends, and friends of friends we had never even met. The coverings on my walls and daily messages kept my spirits up! When he was relieved to go home and check on our children, my Aunt came to caregive in his place. Immediately she slapped a "Life is Good" magnet on my door. That little circle was a symbol to all that you were entering a room where a positive attitude was very present. Saying that, I of course had good days and bad...the bad days I was given some very good advice: "have your 10-15 min. or so pity party, then count your blessings and get back in the game." Other than that, I found a new faith in our Lord, and thank him every day for the blessings I DO have. Once I came through it all (infections, GVHD, total knee replacement as a result of the drugs, and other bumps in the road), I now consider myself a Thriver. I have a business that helps me offer help, guidance, links, etc. to cancer patients/caregivers and continue to create art that says "I am a Survivor". I also will Relay for Life until I can't walk any longer so that we can WIN THIS FIGHT!!!

      over 4 years ago
    • ter303's Avatar
      ter303

      I started with MDS then it went into Acute leukemia. I wasn't sure what was going to happen. It happened so fast. I didn't research my options, I totally believed in my doctors and followed every instruction to the tee. I felt they new what they were doing because so many people have/had Leukemia. I wasn't paving a new path. It was already paved. I felt so fortunate that that was the case. I counted my blessings everyday. I knew there were people out there that had it worse. But still is was a horrible journey. I never got mad or felt sorry for my self. For every bad thing that happened, I thought of a positive thing. Another thing I did when I got diagnosed with cancer, everyday I would write everything that I had to be thankful for. That came in so handy because there were days I couldn't think of blessings so I would refer to that journal. I have a wonderful husband, kids, mom, siblings and friends that I made this horrible journey tolerable. Knowing my family was taken care of was very comforting, even though it was not done my way. I had no control of that or anything for a while. I thought of it that they were being loved. I was so loved.

      almost 4 years ago

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