• Long time survivor tips?

    Asked by MarcieB on Sunday, July 19, 2020

    Long time survivor tips?

    CovidCancer recently asked if there were any/many long term survivors *out there* and at least 17 of you replied! I have a feeling there are even more who have not responded. It is so encouraging. And it has prompted me to wonder if there is any special thing you might be doing that maybe you suspect could be helping? Of course there is always genetics and quality of treatment to consider, but is there any other thing...(even something you consider QUIRKY) that you might have incorporated into your habits since your treatment? Yoga routines? Ginger capsules? Apple cider vinegar? Music that helps lift your mood or trigger your *fight* response? Drinking more fresh water? I'm not asking for snake oil treatments (lol!) - just maybe something you added or subtracted in you daily routine.

    17 Answers from the Community

    17 answers
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      In my case, I hold it to be purely spiritual. Best to allow the spiritual to affect the physical and not allow the physical to affect the spiritual. A good spiritual life leads one away from the pain and drudgery of the physical life. Holding firmly to a goal beyond the physical lifts the spirit when nothing else will.

      In all these years and with each relapse, I have received what is called the Sacrament of Anointing. Part of what is commonly known as the "Last Rites" they clearly are not. Rather, they are sacraments of healing. Are they effective? Well, with a 99.66% chance of not being here, I tend to think so.

      6 months ago
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      I like it. It brings to mind a famous quote by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin - "We are not physical beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a physical experience."

      6 months ago
    • Teachertina's Avatar
      Teachertina

      I have learned to be more aware of what I eat and drink, trying to avoid chemicals, additives and such. I’m not strictly organic, but am eating more fresh fruits, veggies and less fatty meats. I drink more water, no sodas, have a few cocktails when I want to and exercise more. I rarely eat fast food anymore and cook at home now, especially with the virus problem going on. I used to eat junk food all the time, but now I have healthier snacks too. I can feel the difference if I eat something not so good for me. Not sure if it’s going to lengthen my life, but I’ll feel better for the time I have, I hope! Quality is important over quantity to me!

      6 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      I think for me it was being able to have excellent breast doctors and staff, and finding my tumor early. I did everything my doctors recommended. I also stopped drinking alcohol, except very rarely. After maybe ten years post-dx., I stopped eating meat or fowl, only fish and dairy and veggies (not nearly enough veggies or fruit, and way too much dairy and desserts). I also got put on an antidepressant/anti-anxiety med. I don’t exercise at all now (haven’t for years). I get my annual mammogram and ultrasound (used to be mammo and breast MRI). I do a self-breast exam occasionally. I keep hoping I’ll never again get any cancer, but I’m not always optimistic about that.

      6 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      My doctor credits my attitude and my faith to the fact that I have survived this long. I don't disagree!

      6 months ago
    • ChildOfGod4570's Avatar
      ChildOfGod4570

      For me, the main reason is God Himself! I had stage III when first diagnosed, and I know people have died from that. I know I had my fair share of crying and depression while in treatment, but the doctors all said I did well once the precautions were put in place to prevent nutropenia again. I eat healthy and do have comfort foods in moderation; I exercise 6 hours a week; I surround myself with loving people; I do what the doctors say and pray I can one day get off medication. I just got back from an onchologist check-up 2 weks ago and an still NED, having had my surgery almost 7 years ago! HUGS and God bless.

      6 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      I am a Stage IV rectal cancer survivor -dx October 2014. Some of these are specific for colorectal cancer survivors - daily 325 mg aspirin, 4,000 units Vitamin D daily. Dana Farber studies shows that drinking 24 oz of coffee daily improves survival. And for every cancer survivor - stay active, walk, lift weight to increase muscle to fat ratio. I'm 5'3" and weigh about 125 but I have biceps and strong leg muscles.

      And finally, engage in giving back and have a hobby that you love.

      6 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I'll let you know if I make it out of the hospital this time and through the rest of the treatments.

      6 months ago
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      I am counting on hearing from you, Greg.

      6 months ago
    • hikerchick's Avatar
      hikerchick

      Getting all breast tissue removed. I'm 9 1/2 years out. I had early stage in both breasts with multiple points of origin. No breasts. No reconstruction. No problems. I have been extremely lucky.

      6 months ago
    • Jayne's Avatar
      Jayne

      We lived on an old apple orchard that was converted to a housing development. My husband was diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer at age 54 and I was diagnosed a year later at age 41. Our tumors were almost identical in terms of size and location. We were both very healthy, active and young, so this just came out of the blue. I truly believe our well was contaminated from pesticides from the apple orchard but can't be sure. I've contacted neighbors but no one else was affected, at least at that time. I've turned way more organic since then, especially apples.

      6 months ago
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      Jayne, that is so interesting (but upsetting too!) We also live in a rural neighborhood and have a well. We now have a reverse osmosis treatment for our drinking water, but we didn't have that for several years. We used bottled water to drink, but I know we used some well water for cooking and coffee - I just thought the heat would purify the water? In my neighborhood three of us have been dx with triple positive bc. One is my next door neighbor. I just thought it was a coincidence, but last year someone pointed out to me that it might not be? Our properties were once farm land.
      I think turning organic is good advice.

      6 months ago
    • Jayne's Avatar
      Jayne

      MarciB - that is disturbing the number of bc cases in your neighborhood. I totally agree - it's a possible connection to the well but it sounds like you have remediated the problem with the reverse osmosis system. I think purifying the food and water we consume is the best defense we have!

      6 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      My county has the highest amount of Breast cancer cases per capita. They think it may be tied to the glaciers that came through this area, the high amount of natural radon, and other factors. This shocked me when I was doing research about the state of Illinois.
      I drink mostly bottled water. My house was built in the 1960's and I don't know what kind of pipes we have. And I use bottle water for cooking things like pasta.
      I try to eat organic if I have a choice. And mild exercise, even walking, helps in so many ways. I'm almost an eight year survivor.

      6 months ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      I changed my life after my cancer diagnosis. I was fortunate to receive several months of counseling on changes I could incorporate into my daily routine that could possibly help with my survival post chemo and I took this information to heart. I made numerous dietary changes, no red meat, no meat containing nitrates, increased my vegetable and fruit intake and lessened my dairy. I started taking 2000 IU of Vitamin D3 daily along with a capsule of fruit pectin my holistic sister in-law encouraged me to take. I have to admit , I smiled at this , but seven years later I still take it and appreciate her thoughtfulness. Although I have always been a walker, I increased that activity and I wear a pedometer everyday. Nothing fancy, just a fifteen dollar pedometer to keep track of my steps. I set goals ,and now walk two to four miles daily. Bad weather? I move the car out of the garage and do my steps there, or down the hallways of my house. I try to cut down on the sweets, less sugar, and the salt. Lessening the salt has been much easier than lessening that dang sugar though.

      6 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Have a competent dr. And medical team. When you hear, "I've never seen that before ", it's time for another team!

      6 months ago
    • Whitey61's Avatar
      Whitey61

      yrs since diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic prostate cancer, initially given 3-6 months terminal prognosis...fooled them!..no response to any conventional treatment., Had my tumor Genetically Sequenced at Foundation medicine and matched me to effective treatment with checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy.. currently after 50 Infusions over 5 yrs in complete durable remission NED, I supplement with Vitamin D, calcium, eat healthy and treat myself often, i stay active, started my own business after early retirement, advocate and travel the world for several Biotechnology and Cancer Foundations speaking on Genetics and Immunotherapy, all this just keeps me going..God Bless you all.

      6 months ago

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