• Loss of voice after radiation. I lost my voice for about a month during and after radiation, it came back and I was finally able to talk

    Asked by GregP_WN on Thursday, October 6, 2016

    Loss of voice after radiation. I lost my voice for about a month during and after radiation, it came back and I was finally able to talk

    fairly normal. But lately, in the last year, I am routinely having voice issues, not being able to talk without having a hoarse voice or sometimes not much comes out. Have any of you had issues like this years after radiation was over?

    14 Answers from the Community

    14 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Greg, when you had your scan recently, did they look at your lungs? Thinking hoarseness is a symptom of lung cancer. Certainly hope and pray that's not the case.

      Otherwise, I haven't had radiation so don't know about long-term side effects.

      Praying it is sinus related somehow and that your voice will come back with no issues.

      over 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Hope Livewith is waaay off base.

      Your throat and vocal chords were burned. Some tissues were vaporized away. What remains, remains inflammed and sometimes it is simply too much.

      Try some slippery elm, as an addition to your morning cereal. It is strongly anti inflammatory. Thayers sells it as a losenge (& has for over 125 years) at any drug store but in the case of your extraordinary circumstance, I would think you need stronger portions.

      If you want to try it, shop locally or contact me privately or thru my website @

      www.etsy.com/shop/rawmaven

      I got a wholesalers license when I was having an impossible time getting a diagnosis so may be able to get you a better deal.

      It is the inner bark of a US tree. You need to buy it organically so poachers dont strip all the bark off one tree, thus killing it. One can trace back organic supplies and the suppliers only take a portion of the inner bark from each tree, letting it live and heal to grow more soothing bark.

      My throat got inflammed from a different source at a time in the past. Im allergic to sulfamoids. I cut my leg with a machete. They gave me one too few stitches and convinced me to take "just one pill) so I would not get an infection.

      My vocal chords swole up to the point that I could not speak. They wanted to give me prednizone but I wrote on my pad "No, thank you. You have done enough."

      I went home and ate & drank slippery elm along with an herbal combo. It took 5 months before I could speak again. My voice doesnt boom quite so much but it works.

      Point being, you need to care for yourself because vaporized tissue doesnt regrow and you need to constantly fight against inflammation, IMHO.

      Best wishes, Greg

      over 4 years ago
    • CASSIEME1's Avatar
      CASSIEME1

      GREG, LET SHAKE THAT DEVIL OFF. NO MORE BAD WORD STUFF FOR YOU (:)
      WE DONT SAY THAT WORD AS MY GRAND BABY SAYS. HOPEFULLY JUSTCHANGING IN THE WEATHER , OR SINUS DRAINAGE.

      over 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      And do not let yourseff get dehydrated!!!

      over 4 years ago
    • LaughSmile's Avatar
      LaughSmile

      Same with me, Greg. Squamos cell in the pure sinus area in back of throat. Radiation partially paralyzed vocal chords causing my voice to be weak and raspy. Also caused other after affects such as some hearing loss, neck chronic neck and upper back pain and trouble swallowing.

      I remain cancer free for 11 years. I just went back to the interoloogist to arrange an esophageal dilation. Do you similar after affects from radiation?

      over 4 years ago
    • Richardc's Avatar
      Richardc

      My voice was very weak, almost couldn't talk after radiation. It took almost a year for any semblance of a return to normal. 7 years since treatment and I still have episodes where I have tightening and difficulty speaking when I turn my head to talk.

      over 4 years ago
    • LaughSmile's Avatar
      LaughSmile

      Wow. Thanks for posting these responses. I'm not alone!

      over 4 years ago
    • thestarr's Avatar
      thestarr

      After radiation, I couldn't speak for a few months. Gradually my voice came back for which I'm so grateful. However, my voice is definitely not the same as it was. It is very raspy. If I'm speaking for any length of time, my voice cuts out and I start to drool out of the side of my mouth.
      There have been so many side affects that have followed radiation that they say are the "new normal" it's just getting use to it. I thought after 5 years something would change but when I read these posts, I realize not to resist what's going on and to just "be" with it and not give it any more energy.

      over 4 years ago
    • planogirl60's Avatar
      planogirl60

      12 years out I have/had issues of hoarseness. It usually comes about after certain foods, like a little spicy or rough textured items like breaded stuff or yelling. I try to refrain from yelling these days. LOL

      over 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Greg, I am astonished by you! See your PCP now that is an order. As Live With Cancer says hoarseness can be a symptom of lung cancer it was also a symptom of esophageal cancer. One which I ignored for over a year. And it is also a symptom of heart disease.

      over 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have discovered after asking my doctors about this, and not getting much help, that the problem comes from a chain of things. First, allergies, they make me have nasal drainage, even when I'm taking allergy meds. Then the drainage makes my throat tickle, I cough, (a lot, and hard) until I get hoarse. Second, I love milk and ice cream, both of which make mucous. So I get thick stuff together with the nasal drainage that I cough and cough to get up.My vocal chords are tender from the radiation and can't handle my earthquake-like coughing. My self-diagnosed remedy has been to increase my allergy dosage, drink a little more water, ( I still don't drink enough, Donna fusses at me), and take Mucinex.

      Now, I know, if I laid off the dairy products I could probably fix this easier, but HEY, you gotta live a little! For now, I am able to control it, as long as I can remember to give myself two squirts a day of FloNase and take a shot of the Mucinex a few times a day.

      over 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      It might behoove you to be a little less stubborn.

      Animal products will always make mucus but you neednt make ice cream from animal milk nor have milk from an animal product.

      $250 will buy yourself a masticating juicer with which you can make utterly wonderful ice cream from banana. A high speed blender will do you the same from nuts and dates and avocado. A regular blender will mix up delicious milk from nuts and seeds and dates.

      It is a brave new world, GregP-WN.
      It is also quite delicious.

      Inquire @ www.etsy.com/shop/rawmaven

      over 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      You might also think to help yourself by looking up "neti pot" to clear the mucus and to also check the successful anti allergy research done with "black seed oil".

      Best wishes

      over 4 years ago
    • LaughSmile's Avatar
      LaughSmile

      When I was born I was so surprised I couldn't speak for a year! Hehe...

      My ability to swallow changes by the minute, hour, day, week...
      Usually able to swallow smoothies, mash potatoes, pudding... But my throat tightened up last week and was unable to swallow anything until this morning.

      I just keep trying until the condition changes.

      Overall, I love comedy and humor. I continue to write stand-up material and aspire to produce a syndicated comedy show.

      Never give up.

      -Harold
      www.LaughSmile.com

      over 4 years ago

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