• Many of us cancer patients/survivors say that we learned some important things about ourselves and life after being diagnosed that maybe we

    Asked by GregP_WN on Monday, August 31, 2015

    Many of us cancer patients/survivors say that we learned some important things about ourselves and life after being diagnosed that maybe we

    wouldn't have learned or known had we not been diagnosed. So, what piece of life advice would you give to someone who is NOT a cancer patient that you really wish they would take?

    19 Answers from the Community

    19 answers
    • Ejourneys' Avatar
      Ejourneys

      The lessons for me can be summed up in three words: Honor your temperament. Included in this are dropping the "shoulds," choosing your battles, and self-acceptance/trust. As Popeye says, "I yam what I yam!"

      about 4 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Have Courage to Plot out your OWN Path and not somebody else's....

      about 4 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Live your life. Be happy. Have fun. Don't sweat the small stuff. Love greatly and hate less.

      about 4 years ago
    • PCa_2015's Avatar
      PCa_2015

      One of the important things I am realizing about myself & life after my PCa diagnosis is the value of having a strong team of doctors on your side and, in particular, having a key physician to act as the team's quarterback. To continue this football metaphor, the key physician should be able to move the ball down the field in terms of their knowledge of the latest treatment research for your particular form of cancer, show leadership, be willing to defend your treatment needs, & be positive in the face of long odds. I think I at least have a good QB (my radiation oncologist) on my medical support team who combines honesty with compassion, so as to not give false hope but also to not exclude the possibility of miraculous remissions. One should never rule out luck even when there seems to be no space for it, or, as Hippocrates put it, "The art of medicine is long, life is short, opportunity fleeting, the experiment perilous, judgment flawed." Even when we reconcile (Acceptance in the Kubler-Ross model of cancer grief) our minds to the reality that our disease may be untreatable, never give up faith in the possibility of a successful hail mary down field. So, for me, the lesson is have a strong team, whether in marriage, family, business, life or disease management, and this is the advice I would give someone who is not a cancer patient.

      about 4 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      It's sometimes hard to find that Quarterback.....It seems there are too many different Docs and not that much coordination.

      about 4 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      PCa_2015 - I so agree!!! My team is so awesome. The few times I have needed to see someone other than my oncologist, he has them come to his office and they meet with me together. They make all decisions together.

      about 4 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I feel hopeless and doomed.

      about 4 years ago
    • Janetspringer's Avatar
      Janetspringer

      I've learned to better care for myself and not do things just because someone thinks I should.

      about 4 years ago
    • msesq's Avatar
      msesq

      Life is short, live it NOW!

      about 4 years ago
    • cam32505's Avatar
      cam32505

      I agree with msesq. I have a friend who's in hospice, but still fighting. She gives me encouragement to do things when I don't feel the best, because this may be the best I'll feel again. So, I do push myself to find enjoyment in every little thing, even going to work.

      about 4 years ago
    • carlie's Avatar
      carlie

      After diagnosis, you participate in the best things in life. As you listen to others problems and battles, you can easily discern real from fantasy, love from strife, joy from misery, ascending from descending and want from need.
      As you are blessed with more days, gratitude is exponential. Since it's been 6 years and many surgeries, I am serving anyone in need. That's the privilege of being a cancer patient.

      about 4 years ago
    • Nonnie917's Avatar
      Nonnie917

      I learned that was not as strong as I thought I was. It also showed me the rock that my husband was through this entire journey.

      about 4 years ago
    • IronMom45's Avatar
      IronMom45

      That people aren't who you thought they were so never give your all to anyone because when you need them they might not be there. Sad but true. On the flip side surviving without said people but grieve everyday still. If could go back in time would never of given so much to only be left.

      about 4 years ago
    • Hussy's Avatar
      Hussy

      Less worrying about the past and future. More enjoying in the now.

      about 4 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I learned how expensive cancer is. If I could go back I would work harder and save more money so I could get better medical care.

      about 4 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Boise.....It should ALL be free if we get really sick....
      Got enough to worry about and then bills also is not healthy.
      Only country like this.

      about 4 years ago
    • Maddy61's Avatar
      Maddy61

      I have learned to ask questions, no matter how silly. I've learned that my husband is even kinder than I thought, I am stronger than anyone thought and I can endure what needs to be endured. My faith has kept me tough and humble and grateful to all those who have helped me in this battle.

      about 4 years ago
    • TeriAbby's Avatar
      TeriAbby

      I learned that I need help. This is one thing that taught this do everything yourself lady that I just can't and it's OK!

      about 4 years ago
    • KimG's Avatar
      KimG

      I wish people would learn to slow down a bit and enjoy the people right around you. So many people get caught up in being busy just about every minute of every day. I can tell you I don't know a lot of the people right around me in the neighborhood because they're always busy. Putting their kids in this or that and then complaining when the kids need to be driven around. Even my family did this so I don't see them anymore. I was always taught to be independent, to not need anyone-this is so not true. People, people who need people-are the luckiest people in the whole wide world.

      about 4 years ago

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