• Mastectomy

    Asked by Coopswifey on Tuesday, April 23, 2019

    Mastectomy

    I will be having a mastectomy soon, I don’t know what to expect. The closer the time for surgery the more anxious I feel.. What can I expect? What is the healing time?

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      I didn’t have a mastectomy, so I have no personal information. I’m just writing to wish you all the best.

      3 months ago
    • Coopswifey's Avatar
      Coopswifey

      Thank you

      3 months ago
    • MariePierre's Avatar
      MariePierre

      I'm 76 years old now, and I had a double mastectomy in January 2015 with lymph nodes removal and reconstruction (stage 3). All went well, and I felt ready to move on only after a couple of days. I was good with just the surgery, but I had to listen to my Breast Surgeon and went on to Chemo and Radiation; it's 2019, I'm still here to tell you about it. Prayers go with you. You'll be all right.

      3 months ago
    • junie1's Avatar
      junie1

      I also had a double mastectomy,. I was 64yrs of age. that was in 2014. all went well, stayed in hospital overnight, even though they say its outpatient surgery.
      I was up and out bed the net day, after coming home, and was out doing errands, with my daughter as a driver, on the 3rd day. just tucked those drains in the bra type cover they put on me, and away we went!
      6 weeks later I was back to work,, course I worked at a school, and it was a good thing surgery was on summer break.
      all went well for me with everything,, a nd I did not choose to do any reconstruction.
      good luck to you.

      3 months ago
    • Coopswifey's Avatar
      Coopswifey

      Thank you for that. I feel a lot better. I was hearing so much negativity, I was beginning to get a little be afraid. Your responses really help

      3 months ago
    • Twinkletoes' Avatar
      Twinkletoes (Best Answer!)

      I had it done two months ago. I never experienced any pain at all. You will have a drain to let fluids out for awhile. It was no big deal. I chose no reconstruct and insurance got me a fake boobie and some nice bras to tuck it into. You can not tell I had anything removed with the bra on. I don't stand in the mirror feeling bad about my new look, I am THRILLED the cancer is out. And your life will go on. Keep an upbeat positive attitude and that will make all the difference. Don't be afraid. It's not so bad! Good luck with your new adventure.

      3 months ago
    • Bug's Avatar
      Bug

      I did not have a mastectomy but wanted to wish you good luck. Please let us know how you're doing when you feel up to writing. Sending you prayers and very best wishes for an easy time of it.

      3 months ago
    • gpgirl70's Avatar
      gpgirl70

      I had a double mastectomy at age 51. I had a lot of lymph node involvement so I could not have reconstruction at the time of surgery. I made the decision right then to not have reconstruction and asked the surgeon for a flat result. I had a friend who had a double mastectomy and the surgeon left flaps of skin even though she didn’t want reconstruction.

      My surgery took 7 hours because the lymph node area was a mass of cancer. Even with that I just stayed overnight and didn’t take pain meds after the first day. I made sure to walk everyday and increase my distance. I had a camisole with drain holders that was great. I also had a lanyard with clips to hold the drains while I showered. I showered the day after coming home.

      Wishing you the best. I think you’ll be amazed at your own strength and resilience.

      3 months ago
    • Angelaine's Avatar
      Angelaine

      I had a mastectomy with reconstruction, and removal of all lymph nodes (as many as could be found on the affected side), I went through the surgery, and I did not get to go home next day. It is a surgery and there is a period of time that you are out. Have someone knowledgeable about medical things. Like no blood pressure or IV sides of surgery. What your allergies are. The surgery was good, but the aftercare was a lot of busy people. My plastic surgeion used a implanted pain med release over time. I think it was great! I did have some pain, mostly at night, but tried to use NSAIDs/Tylenol for pain rather than too many prescription drugs. I had drains, and use creative techniques to carry them. I did not have any help with drain carrying needs. I had never even known to expect them. If you have questions, ask. Sorry if this is too much, but I believe you need to have some idea of being proactive. I will keep you in my prayers. Blessings,

      3 months ago
    • MLT's Avatar
      MLT

      Before my unilateral mastectomy, my surgeon said there would be very little pain since nerves are cut. You will get zings sometimes from nerves regenerating. The area will remain numb.
      Later that year I had a prophylactic mastectomy and DIEP flap reconstruction. Ask for training on drains, really no big deal. I had a vest and sweatshirt with big pockets that I used to carry them. Be sure to follow lifting directions and do your exercises. Watch your arm on that side. Report any swelling, tightness. Get informed about lymphedema. Many drs dont seem to be as aggressive as they should be about this.
      Wishing you all the best with surgery and treatment.

      3 months ago
    • suz55's Avatar
      suz55

      Lots of great suggestions and tips from everyone above! You might also want to move things in cabinets or shelves that may be difficult to reach for a few days. The exercises definitely help get the mobility back, but it can be frustrating not being able to reach the coffee cup in the morning. Also, button-up or zipper tops might be more comfortable for the first days. Best wishes!

      3 months ago

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