• Most churches are not having in person services because of the virus

    Asked by CancerChicky on Sunday, April 12, 2020

    Most churches are not having in person services because of the virus

    but I keep seeing reports of some that are refusing to close the doors and not have in person services. Is your church having Easter service today?

    26 Answers from the Community

    26 answers
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      The ministers/leaders having in-person services should be arrested, the participants fined.
      They are putting the rest of us in danger. Such a careless group of fools.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      I agree, Molly72. Pastors who encourage this should, at the very least, be fined. They are putting not only their parishioners in extreme danger but every other person whom those parishioners later come in contact with. To display such ignorance and disregard at this time should be considered criminal. IMO.

      I am personally not religious but I know the mainstream denominations here have cancelled all in person services and gone virtual.

      3 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      My church is not open. Considering it's the biggest holiday in our faith, I'm sure it wasn't the easiest decision to make. But they are putting services in YouTube for us to enjoy. It's not the same, but it is helpful to me to see services on the small screen. Hopefully, next year, things will be back to normal.

      3 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      I belong to the United Methodist Church. Both the North GA Conference and the South Georgia Conference issues directives around March 20th to discontinue in-person church services until further notice.

      Given the irrefutable evidence that group gatherings spread coronavirus, resulting in hospitalizations and deaths, it is irresponsible for any minister or pastor to host in-person church services. Drive-in services too should be banned as it will be too tempting for some, and there will be mingling.

      3 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      MOST of the churches around here are complying with the order, but I keep seeing a few that make the news that are trying to make a statement and continue to have services. That puts thousands of people at risk. It makes me wonder about the intelligence level of those making that decision.

      3 months ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Catholic Bishops have cancelled public masses for some time now - and are receiving flak for having done so. They are charged to care for their flocks. How else to do that when an invisible enemy is attacking? Masses have been live streamed for the past month anyway, and there are still a few hardheads (very few thankfully) who are still trying to find a way in.

      Here in the US Corona epicenter (Washington State), numerous members of a Presbyterian choir were infected and at least two died as a result of choir practice. Sadly, it takes tragedy before reality sets in.
      https://komonews.com/news/coronavirus/covid-19-infiltrated-mt-vernon-choir-killing-2-members-and-infecting-others

      3 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Our church closed its doors March 1. One of the nice things about streaming is that my daughter was able to join me for services virtually. Of course it is not like really attending church but we do feel the same sense of community. We are a very large congregation with a church and a chapel which is as large as a church. Our congregation organized a team to call every one of our 1000+ members. I received a call from a lady she asked about my needs and then she asked me if any of my neighbors had needs that our church could meet.
      Today our pastor expressed hope that we might be able to reopen at the end of May. But Western Washington was ground zero and is ahead of the rest of the country. The epicenter has shifted to New York and the East Coast. I feel it would be safer to hunker down and and let the rest of the Nation catch up.

      3 months ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      @GregP_WN A few demand their rights, and that includes the right to be "dead right" - where's the charity in that? What was that we hear quite often? "Thou shalt not put the Lord thy God to the test" Uh-huh. Apparently, some are not as literate or literal as we give them credit for.

      A pastor is in charge of his flock, the shepherd, his sheep. Why so many goats these days?

      3 months ago
    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      I heard Rev Al Sharpton say last week that believing God will protect you from the virus in church is the same mentality as believing that if you jump off a building, God will send down an angel to break your fall. He said God gave us common sense and wants us to use it.

      3 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I agree with po18guy These people have never read the Bible or the Constitution in context. I am sick and tired of seeing friends from Idaho screaming about their 1st Amendment rights

      3 months ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      The Church of God is not a business.

      First, separation of church and state means that, at an institutional level, church and government are separate entities. Jesus spoke about this in Matthew 22:21 when he said, “Therefore render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's,” thus making a clear delineation between the “things that are Caesar’s” (the government’s) and the “things that are God’s.” Likewise, Jesus spoke of his Kingdom not being of this world (John 18:36) while simultaneously acknowledging through Paul that earthly government is established by God for our good. (Rom. 13:1-7). Jesus remains sovereign over both institutions (Matt. 28:18) until such time that he returns to rule and reign in the eschaton (Rev. 11:15). In the meantime, he gives both church and government differing tasks.

      Thus, there exists a healthy separation of church and state, both institutionally and functionally. This is crucial to the mission of the church, which is the preaching of the gospel. We cannot bring about conversion through the power of the sword vested in the state. Only through the power of God’s Spirit can someone be brought unto saving faith in Jesus Christ. “For though we walk in the flesh, we are not waging war according to the flesh. For the weapons of our warfare are not of the flesh but have divine power to destroy strongholds.” (2 Cor. 10:3-4)

      Separation of church and state, properly understood, is a foundational principle which secures the rights and privileges of all citizens under a government and ensures that both government and church function according to their God-given roles. As people of faith, let us seek to engage the public square in a way which is winsome and accords with God’s Word, being mindful of the boundaries which God has established between church and state.

      3 months ago
    • Throatless' Avatar
      Throatless

      My thoughts are that anyone has the right to worship. They can do that any way that they want as long as it doesn't hurt others. You can hurt yourself all you want, but if your worshipping starts hurting me, then we have a problem. These people that are saying that God will protect them from the virus might as well throw a sack full of snakes into the mix. It's the same thing. I noticed this morning that the sheriff's department in a couple of States where a couple churches were having services anyway was writing down the license numbers of the cars that showed up to the church. Now they are going to be told that they have to stay isolated away from everyone for 2 weeks. So, their right to worship wasn't infringed on, but their ability to infect, hurt, or even kill others is going to be limited. Nothing wrong with that.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      The first amendment to the Constitution guarantees "freedom of religion" but what exactly does that mean? It certainly does NOT mean the right to put people either within or outside the congregation in danger.of death by horrible means. We had a case here in New York State a few years ago where a church community decided to "discipline" two teenage boys whom were felt not to be practicing the church's idea of proper behavior. One boy was severely injured, the other was beaten to death. This church was practicing their own particular religion as they interpreted it. Should this have been ignored by the government because of strict interpretation of separation of church in state? Those involved were arrested, brought to trial and convicted by the state. You may say that is an extreme case and abhorrent but how is putting not only a congregation, but unknown numbers of innocent people with whom congregation members might come in contact with in danger? This virus ( not unlike cancer) has no conscience. All are vulnerable and if our only weapon against it is enforced separation then all must participate for that strategy to be effective.

      3 months ago
    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      Separation of church and state appears driven by what is self serving. People want the state to stay out of their ability to worship in churches during this stay at home, putting everyone at risk. Yet, in states where there are school vouchers, they are happy to accept tax payer dollars for parochial education. Tax payers have a responsibility to provide public education, but they should not be paying for ANY private education.

      3 months ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      Dawsonsmom your talking about cults and religions.I was talking about The Church of God.

      3 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Bengal you are right there are limits to religious practices. Murder is one of them.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Tomato - tomaato, potato - potaato. If it is bringing large groups of people together into close intimate contact, until Covid19 is brought under control ( and that may be months!) YA DON'T DO IT.

      3 months ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      I am not knowledgeable about religion, however-- I do believe that one of the the 10 commandments states that one should not kill.
      Guess some churches forgot that one!

      3 months ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      Bengal
      If it is bringing large groups of people together into close intimate contact.Not with me.Worst now then ever.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      I understand that many people are feeling very isolated and alone right now. That is where our pastors need to be concentrating their efforts. I have a friend who is a pastor affiliated with the United Methodist Church. She's not on vacation! She reports that she had never been busier, spending long hours everyday and into the night phoning vulnerable people, keeping in contact and trying to hold meeting and conduct business virtually. Fortunately we live in an age when those things are possible. PaulineJ, I am so sorry that no one has reached out to you. I Hope you can find some solice, companionship, and, yes, even love, here with your fellow WhatNexters.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Our church has been online only for weeks. Congregants and pastors are reaching out to members to be sure no one needs anything. We have facetime and zoom meetings. Our church collects food for seniors and school children who may be hungry every Sunday from 2 - 5. I understand there are traffic jams because so many people are bringing food to donate. The county designated the church as essential so that they can be open to receive and package the food boxes.

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      I think what your church is doing for the community is awesome, LWC. These are the kinds of things that will make a difference, not crowding together for unnecessary services. I am impressed.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @Bengal, our church is awesome. During the summer, it bought over 2 million dollars worth of medical debt for low-income people in the community. It wasn't for members of the church, though doubtless some were - just for the community. People got a letter from the church saying their debts were forgiven. And, the church went one step further and worked with credit bureaus to try to restore people's credit. Given what kind of bills all of us have that gesture touched me more than I can say. I can only imagine what a huge relief it was to the 1000s of people who got the letter. Here is one of many links to the story. https://abcnews.go.com/US/texas-church-donations-pay-off-26m-medical-debt/story?id=65852497

      3 months ago
    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      Wow!! LWC, that is remarkable and such a profound thing for your church to do!! You are right, you have an awesome church!!

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @Dawsonsmom, it strikes me as remarkable that the church was able to buy soooooooooo much debt for such a low amount ... they bought $2.6 MILLION of debt for $27,000. As I was reading the story a few minutes ago (I forget details), I thought ... I would really love to have our estate do something like that for people. Our only child died a year and a half ago and we have an extremely small family. There's really no one to leave our assets to when we die. It would be phenomenal to think that what we leave behind was being used to make people's lives a whole lot easier... Not sure how to make that happen, but think I just might start investigating it!

      3 months ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      LWC, what an incredible, inspiring idea. I hope you can work that out. And you've started me thing. Hmmmmmm.

      3 months ago

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