• New normal look?

    Asked by kimklo on Monday, December 22, 2014

    New normal look?

    I have a unilateral mastectomy, no option for reconstruction for at least 6 months. Hopefully will have drains out today. I am on the heavier side (size D to DD). What are my best options for looking normal?

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • cam32505's Avatar
      cam32505

      Have you looked into mastectomy bras? I'm sure they're not cheap, but they are made for people going through treatment like you are. I think they have padding where you had surgery, and the padding is heavier than when we were just stuffing our bras. Ask your onc. They should be able to refer you somewhere that can fit you. There is a hospital in my area that has a beauty salon and that is part of the service that they provide.

      over 6 years ago
    • ld_105's Avatar
      ld_105

      I found scarves helpful to hide the differences between the breasts. The scarves that form a cowl are great. I also wore a camisole plus a sweater or t shirt so had a double layer of fabric. I had a biopsy on the right breast, MX on left so I wore a sports bra to keep the right flattened and taped surgical pads over both breast to cover the incisions and limit movement. All of this padding helped to balance the look. Hope you are feeling better.

      over 6 years ago
    • KarenSusan's Avatar
      KarenSusan

      I had a unilateral Mastectomy also. I was a size DD especially in my left breast. Right before my third lumpectomy I found excellent surgeon who does Oncoplasty (that is where they take as much tissue as possible while conserving the breast). When Breast Surgeon finished lumpectomy on right side plastic surgeon came in and reduced my left breast (creates less breast tissue that can potentially get Cancer). I ended up with Mastectomy anyway but wasn't sorry they tried. I am now between a C and B cup but closer to a C.

      over 6 years ago
    • MelanieIIB's Avatar
      MelanieIIB

      There are stores that specialize in fitting breast cancer patients with mastectomy bras. There are also a large selection of prostheses they can fit you with. If you don't know where the stores are, you could ask at your surgeon's office or do a web search for mastectomy bras or prostheses. I would also check with your insurance co. Sometimes they will pay for so many mastectomy bras and prosthesis. If the pay for these items, I would also ask them for a list of facilities that are "in-network" for you.

      over 6 years ago
    • mofields' Avatar
      mofields

      I had mastectomy on left breast. While waiting for reconstruction I went to a local shop that specializes in mastectomy bras. My insurance covered the cost of 4 bras and a prothetic for the left side. That was wonderful because it helped balance me out until I could have my reconstruction. Check with your local hospital or cancer center for a place that does this. I even used the mastectomy bra to hold my drain when I had my reconstruction surgery.

      over 6 years ago
    • baridirects' Avatar
      baridirects

      You should definitely seek out a certified mastectomy fitter - your surgeon or the hospital will know who's available in your area - don't make the mistake of purchasing a prosthesis without the help of someone who knows the techniques of fitting you with a form that will give you a perfectly balanced appearance - it's both a science and an art. As I had a double mastectomy, it was a little easier to fit me. I'm comfortable with appearing in public with no prosthetics, but I have to admit that wearing them does make many items of clothing fit a lot better :-)

      Namaste,
      Christine

      over 6 years ago
    • Lauren65's Avatar
      Lauren65

      I also had Mastectomy on the right side, was/Am a C cup, was fitted with prosthesis and bras before I had my tram flap reconstruction. I felt very balanced, and no one could tell I had anything done even before my reconstruction. Now that I have had my recon, you can't even tell when I wear a bathing suit. Had an Excellent surgeon (Chief of Plastic and Recon surgery no less!) Given all that I went through, I am vey pleased with how things turned out.

      over 6 years ago
    • kimklo's Avatar
      kimklo

      Thanks all. I will look into a fitter after Christmas.

      over 6 years ago
    • Kathy1's Avatar
      Kathy1

      I am also a DD and was referred to a women's specialty health store. They fitted me with a silicone gel prosetic. They are expensive but many insurance policies cover them. I am on Medicare and they cover a prosetic every two years and 3 masectomy bras every quarter. Mine is extremely comfortable as a matter of fact I don't even know I have it on. I have even had a friend look at me and say "I thought you had a mastectomy" - I loved it. I am not a candidate for reconstruction so I am thrilled.

      over 6 years ago
    • LindaAnnie's Avatar
      LindaAnnie

      I didn't have a mastectomy, only a lumpectomy, but the tumor was large and they took a lot of tissue trying to get clear margins. I'm large and a size DD, so there is a big difference between sides... Scarfs, knitted cowls, layers with top being cardigan, shirts with vertical pleats and buttons. And big earrings that jingle so people are distracted and look up.

      over 6 years ago
    • niborflamingo's Avatar
      niborflamingo

      These are all good suggestions. I would also add that shirts/sweaters that have patterns on them (floral say) help to disguise the imbalance. When I had my mastectomy I had to wait for a month before I could wear a prosthesis but as it was winter, I wore a bulky sweater or jacket over my tops which helped. Now that I have my flap done, I'm very happy with my look.

      over 6 years ago

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