• On which side was your breast cancer?

    Asked by omaalyce on Tuesday, October 5, 2021

    On which side was your breast cancer?

    A group I belong to recently asked this question. Out of 60 of us, the majority is on the left side. I also noticed this during chemo. My cancer was in my left breast and left axilla. So, I was wondering how many here also had their cancer in their left breast. Have any of you seen an article or research about this.

    23 Answers from the Community

    23 answers
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      Left side, I believe more modern machinery, techniques reduce the possibility of heart/lung damage. I had excellent care, physicists planned the placement of the beams.

      2 months ago
    • Angelaine's Avatar
      Angelaine

      Left side. I have not seen any surveys, article or research on this. Strangely enough I had signs of cancer, but I had no idea of the sign of increasing breast size. I was leaning more to water around the heart, which my parents and grandparents had.

      2 months ago
    • Bug's Avatar
      Bug

      Right side.

      2 months ago
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      Mine was in my left breast. I have never seen any articles on this.

      2 months ago
    • Dltmoll's Avatar
      Dltmoll

      Left side here. I've seen a few articles that state that occuence on the left side is a little more common, but the only citations to studies I've seen refer to one in Iceland in 1990.

      2 months ago
    • Judytjab's Avatar
      Judytjab

      Left side

      2 months ago
    • Kp2018's Avatar
      Kp2018

      There are quite a few studies demonstrating that breast cancers are more common in the left breast, especially in the upper left quadrant. Just search "lateralization of breast cancer

      2 months ago
    • lynn1950's Avatar
      lynn1950

      Left side.

      2 months ago
    • Redporchlady's Avatar
      Redporchlady

      Right side

      2 months ago
    • omaalyce's Avatar
      omaalyce

      I found this on www.roche.com after reading Kp2018's post. "The left breast is 5 - 10% more likely to develop cancer than the right breast. The left side of the body is also roughly 5% more prone to melanoma (a type of skin cancer). Nobody is exactly sure why this is."

      I saw a surgeon yesterday about my lymphedema. I will be having lymphedema transfer surgery after going to PT and insurance approval. There are 2 types this surgeon performs, one is less invasive and that's what I will have first. If I don't have success with that procedure then there is a more invasive one that can be done.

      "The surgeon connects the lymphatic vessels in the affected area of the body to the tiny veins nearby. This allows the excess lymphatic fluid to drain directly into the vein and be returned to the body’s natural circulation." It requires several small incisions on the arm, but takes 3 hours to do.

      I'll let you all know how it goes when it happens in a month or 2.

      Thank you all for answering, I really appreciate it. Hope everyone is doing well.

      2 months ago
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      Left side for me.

      Omaalyce, I am very interested in what happens with your lymphedema and I am wondering when you first began to notice it? I had my lumpectomy (left side) January, 2019, so I am going on three years. These last few months I have noticed my left breast scars are filling in and sometimes it feels uncomfortable under my arm (where lymph nodes were removed). I wouldn't say pain, it just feels like I am larger there, like swelling? and then it goes away. (?) I had a normal mammogram in September and the tech said it was likely caused by my radiation treatments. I will see my doctor in October, so I am going to ask, but I am wondering how long it was before you were told you have lymphedema?

      2 months ago
    • omaalyce's Avatar
      omaalyce

      I first noticed mine about a year after I finished treatments in 2017. I started feeling very full in my arm and axilla, where my surgeries were. I had a lumpectomy after chemo and 9 lymph nodes were removed, unfortunately 4 of those were cancerous, so then I had radiation. Overtime, my arm and the tissue around my scar has gotten fuller. My bottom arm from my wrist to my elbow gets very hard. I have had cellulitis twice, which is one of the things you need to watch for when you have lymphedema. Last year during the holidays, my whole arm was so hard that the doctor ordered a Doppler to make sure I did not have a blood clot. I see a massage therapist and I have gone through PT twice, but the fluid just won't flow and has built up again. My arm feels heavy and even with my compression sleeve on you can tell it is larger than my right arm. Definitely ask your doctor about it and see if there are lymphedema clinics or physical therapists in your area. Many people have relief with PT and home exercises. Good luck and please share what the doctor says after you see him.

      2 months ago
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      Left

      2 months ago
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      Omaalyce, this was very helpful. For one thing - I am going to ask how many of my lymph nodes were removed, I honestly don't know? I only lately have experienced the tissue around my scar (I have three scars) becoming full and sometimes feels slightly sore. So far I have not experienced any hardness, but there are times when my ring finger and pinky feel tingly or numb. I will certainly let you know what happens next! Thank you for sharing your information with me (us).

      2 months ago
    • ChildOfGod4570's Avatar
      ChildOfGod4570

      It was on the right for me. :) HUGS and God bless.

      2 months ago
    • Gin's Avatar
      Gin

      My experience has been on the right side, two different times.

      2 months ago
    • TerriL's Avatar
      TerriL

      Mine was on the right side. I am left handed, I wonder if that factors in?

      2 months ago
    • Geannie's Avatar
      Geannie

      Wow....I'm truly impressed with these findings!!

      Mines was on the left side as well!!!!!!!!

      2 months ago
    • MarcieB's Avatar
      MarcieB

      I am curious about the left-handed/ right-handed correlation too? When I had my bone density test the tech asked me if I were right handed and it turned out my left arm is the one with osteopenia - not my right. Maybe there is something to be said for developing ambidextrous skills?

      2 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      Left side.

      2 months ago
    • Rustysmom's Avatar
      Rustysmom

      Right side for me.

      about 1 month ago
    • Redporchlady's Avatar
      Redporchlady

      I had a lumptectomy and full right axilla dissection so Mayo had me go to the Lymphedema clinic. They taught me excercises to help as I always felt like I was carrying around a bowling bowl on that arm. They did tell me to keep my weight down and be active. I also took PT for cording that I had in that area but what finally has done it for me is strength training. I am going to be 58 at the end of the month and I am deadlifting, bench pressing, dumbbell lunges, one arm rows, etc. I have been doing that for two years and continue to get stronger. I no longer have ANY issues with my lymphedema and also I reversed my ostopenia! Who knew that working out 3x a week would lower my blood pressure, glucose and great cholesterol levels. I also do not eat any processed foods and follow a high protein diet for my muscle growth.

      about 1 month ago
    • Lindy's Avatar
      Lindy

      One thing I find problematic about ordering clothes online, no information on sleeve width. I have a larger left upper arm due to lymphedema. I have had doctors deny I have lymphedema, I always remind them that the statistical odds of all the left sleeves on garments in my closet being a tighter fit than all the right sleeves would be astronomical.

      about 1 month ago

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