• Over the last 9 1/2 years I have noticed that up to now, no one actually gets a cure from prostate cancer once it has escaped its home.

    Asked by MichaelV on Thursday, May 10, 2012

    Over the last 9 1/2 years I have noticed that up to now, no one actually gets a cure from prostate cancer once it has escaped its home.

    We beat at it, radiate it, remove it, drug it, cruse at it, but it still kind of just sits there and says Fxxx you and keeps coming back to grow again. Am I all alone on this one?

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • WizardOfWesley's Avatar
      WizardOfWesley

      Sadly it does seem that way ..and its my biggest fear

      over 5 years ago
    • mgm48's Avatar
      mgm48 (Best Answer!)

      When I met the Oncologist the first time, he described it as a chronic disease like diabetes that I would live with for the rest o0f my life unless some "silver bullet" came along. So you got it just right. we just keep trying the next bullet in the arsenal to get another year at a time while the researchers look for something better.
      I'm at work on chemo day 2 so crossing my fingers that the side effects stay manageable. Have a 21 more days to go until cycle 2 on May 31.
      just keep kicking at the darn thing and you really should be looking at it as there is always something new to throw at the disease.

      over 5 years ago
    • migsoon's Avatar
      migsoon

      I wish I had an answer for you but mine I assume was still contained. ( T1C). The oncologist treated it in 2004 with EBRT with BATT whatever. Several weeks of treatment.PSA went down and stayed down. Only problem is that the radiation left me with chronic radiation proctitis which I have had surgically repaired several times without a "cure" and now I deal with a variety of pain and a minor form of fecal incontinence.
      Since I'm 70 now, have other medical XXX to deal, I try and get by with narcotics and electro stimulation to ease the muscle spasms, but leaking XXX can be a real XXX, as it interferes with any kind of social life. I drive for "seniors" part time, and any one of us could be blamed for the smell. I use convenient toilet paper and some lidocaine ointment to stick it to my XXX hole in between being where other less vulger treatments can be applied. I also have a desk full of valium for the spasms when running around with wires attached to by butt cheeks may bring a frown or two in more public settings. But hey, I'm old and poor, so putting me up for a few days in the local jail isn't such a bad thing. Getting out can be, as that's always a money / lawyer thing. I'm way past being embarrassed by anything anymore.

      over 5 years ago
    • migsoon's Avatar
      migsoon

      The "XXX" thing. Cute!

      over 5 years ago
    • fusilier's Avatar
      fusilier

      No, you aren't alone.

      The stats are straightforward: most CA's give you a "5-years and cured" statement. Not prostate; it ain't considered cured until there's been no recurrence after _ten_ years. Nobody's sure why.

      I've hears some descriptions of what cells look like under the microscope. For things like lymphomas or breast CA, or whatever, the appearance is "different but...." For prostate, it looks like "somebody threw a hand-grenade in the cells."

      Don't want to end on a downer. We are brothers; we survive; we remember each other.

      fusilier
      James 2:24

      over 5 years ago
    • Ross' Avatar
      Ross

      Since the revision of my Gleason score from 7 (before surgery) to a 9 after surgery, I have heard these following comments from either my urologist or my oncologist: "high risk disease", "I see why they threw everything but the kitchen sink at you",
      "while your PSA is now at <.01, I think we should continue with the Lupron hormone therapy". So it seems that the continuation of treatments is the best guess to keep the cancer at bay. My urologist has now decided that I should also be on Xgeva to act on bone density loss. Maybe we should be thankful that there are new treatments and drugs that help extend our lives. But it sometimes feels like a XXX shoot.
      I work at keeping the faith of the good life and hope to pass on some of that faith to others traveling this same path. God bless.
      Still a survivor, Ross

      over 5 years ago
    • Ross' Avatar
      Ross

      Since the revision of my Gleason score from 7 (before surgery) to a 9 after surgery, I have heard these following comments from either my urologist or my oncologist: "high risk disease", "I see why they threw everything but the kitchen sink at you",
      "while your PSA is now at <.01, I think we should continue with the Lupron hormone therapy". So it seems that the continuation of treatments is the best guess to keep the cancer at bay. My urologist has now decided that I should also be on Xgeva to act on bone density loss. Maybe we should be thankful that there are new treatments and drugs that help extend our lives. But it sometimes feels like a XXX shoot.
      I work at keeping the faith of the good life and hope to pass on some of that faith to others traveling this same path. God bless.
      Still a survivor, Ross

      over 5 years ago
    • tspoon's Avatar
      tspoon

      Doc told hubby last mth, realistic would be year, even with treatments is all he had left. So. . . We continue to try, and appreciate honesty. Some say he took away hope, we think he gave us what we knew in our hearts.

      over 5 years ago
    • thomasmichael's Avatar
      thomasmichael

      It is generally agreed that if a man can go 15 months after a radical prostatectomy without hios
      PSA doubling he has a over ninety percent chance of being alive 15 or more years later.

      over 3 years ago
    • MichaelV's Avatar
      MichaelV

      I just go on fighting. Out in Jan.'02 and "0" PSA until May '05. Perhaps in years to come there will be a cure and I hope I am around to benefit from it, in the meantime my oncologist and I look for more arrows to put in the quiver. Right now I'm on a one man clinical trial with Zytiga and Xtandi. Finishing off the first month next week.

      over 3 years ago
    • tspoon's Avatar
      tspoon

      FYI he was wrong and he is still here on Xtandi and hoping it will work as Zytiga did for a year and chemo a year as well.

      over 2 years ago

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