• Pain medicine, are you getting what you need?

    Asked by GregP_WN on Monday, January 20, 2020

    Pain medicine, are you getting what you need?

    With the opioid epidemic going on I was worried that I wouldn't be able to get the pain meds that I know will be needed when I come home. I remember the last radical neck dissection that I had in 2009, now I'm going to have that on the left side as well as the laryngectomy. Last week I questioned my doctor about this. She said there are no worries about getting whatever I need and as much as I need. She said I would be signing a disclaimer saying that I understand that I am getting prescribed pain meds and that it's basically up to me as far as what I take. If I take more than is on the label, it's not her fault. Pretty simple it seems. She also said that since I have cancer in a severe diagnosis that I am clear to be prescribed whatever it takes.

    So, what has your experience been in getting pain meds? Any troubles, been refused, had the police sicked on you, or getting what you need when you want it?

    10 Answers from the Community

    10 answers
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Having a high tolerance for pain, I generally have, or am offered too much! In hospital, it was almost forced upon me. Post-spinal surgery, my intense nerve pain was gone - residual soreness from the incision was all that remained. Yet, I was asked repeatedly and pointedly if I wanted to push the button. No! I would rather know when I am placing too much stress on a surgical area. As well: spinal surgery AND constipation. Ponder that...

      The last cancer pain I had was in my small intestine and was episodic. I just grinned and bore it. Once the chemo hit, it evaporated.

      about 1 month ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Partly my issue too PO, I have a high tolerance for the pain and the drugs. The drugs don't do as much for me as they would a "normal" person so it takes more to do the job. Sometimes they look at me like they think I'm a druggie trying to score again.

      about 1 month ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I have mental issues with pain. I like to deny that I have pain. I have the attitude that "I am not a wimp" I communicated that attitude to my pain management Dr. I also refuse any medication that messes with my cognitive abilities. We got into that discussion when the subject of medical marijuana (legal in this state ) came up. Besides I hate chocolate. However the Dr. said that they had gummy bears. I also cannot take Nsaids which cause stomach bleeding or Tylenol which causes liver problems. The pain management Dr. is very happy to work with me for other methods of pain control such as mindfulness and body awareness. The Dr. has also added some supplements to my diet magnesium calcium and B12. And then some times the best pain killer is a furry friend. The medical center in Boise had comfort dogs in the ER waiting room and the chemo suite.

      about 1 month ago
    • Sasukesuma's Avatar
      Sasukesuma

      I also have a high tolerance for pain meds. I worked in a drug store and when I came back to work following hip replacement surgery and had to be on my feet and very active for 8 hours a day, my pharmacist would come to check on me a few times a day to see how I was tolerating it. No problem. I can’t tell a difference. When I finished chemo my oncologist would not prescribe anything for me any more. I anticipated that and had been rationing my meds. My PCP however told me I was not taking enough. He laid out a plan where I could take 2 a day, but not two days in a row. With a maximum of 8 a week. I still ration them. I feel like I never know when I will be cut off and want to save some for bad days when I have to interact with people.

      about 1 month ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I'm worried about them putting Gabepentin in as a drug along the lines of opiates because idiots take it to boost the high of opiates or some such nonsense. I can tell when I miss a dose, and I only see my doc once a year, so that would really stink.

      about 1 month ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I have moved to a state where both medical and recreational marijuana are legal. My Dr. pulled my gabepentin now I am on another medication that isn't working. The Dr. did discuss marijuana. I would absolutely NOT go that route because there are no controls on the quality of the product. I also have mental issues with pain and pain killers. I don't want to look like a wimp. Right now the Dr. wants to implant a simulator

      about 1 month ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Things have noticeably changed. A few years ago, at the mere mention of pain, out came the prescription pad and you had yourself oxi or hydrocodone. Now there are questions and my last two surgeries instead of an automatic 30 tabs it was ten. In fact, last time the doctor said, "you don't really need this do you? If you change your mind call me."

      It is unfortunate when those who do need it are denied. A friend of mine has been on Opioids for years after breaking his back in an industrial accident. Doctor just denied him renewal. Probably would be a good idea for him to try to get off then but not cold turkey. That's exactly what leads people to seek alternatives.

      about 1 month ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      No! I had a knee replacement and was given pain meds for the first ten days. It was such a hassle to try to get more that I just gave up and only took tylenol. At times, I needed something, especially after physical therapy and I just had to use ice and elevate. I am getting my second knee done in March and that is the one thing that I am dreading. The people who need medication cannot have it, even after a serious surgery. Crazy.

      about 1 month ago
    • Sasukesuma's Avatar
      Sasukesuma

      Cllinda the Tylenol caused more problems for me than the opioids. My liver values were elevated by taking it just as directed. I don’t think most people know hoe easy it is to overdose on Tylenol, either, though doctors should know.

      30 days ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      So if you can't handle Tylenol, what is the alternative? I have had other surgeries and never had a problem getting relief from pain. Now because of the drug companies, the doctors, and others who pushed the pills into us on an epidemic scale, we can't have something to keep us from being in constant pain? It makes no sense to me at all. I do understand that they were way over prescribed but there has to be a balance of helping those who need help, especially after major surgery. And I consider cancer surgery, knee replacement surgery, and others to be ranked to the point of needing medication to help with pain. At least for a few weeks until we are strong enough to get through the recovery on our own.

      30 days ago

    Help the community by answering this question:

    Create an account to post your answer Already have an account? Sign in!

    By using WhatNext, you agree to our User Agreement, and Privacy Policy


    Read and answer more squamous cell carcinomas, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer questions.  Also, don't forget to check out our Squamous Cell Carcinomas, Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer page.