• Part 2 of 2

    Asked by DoreenLouise on Wednesday, December 13, 2017

    Part 2 of 2

    Whether these findings will apply to humans is not know.
    Most women with breast cancer have estrogen-receptor positive tumors; for many patients, endocrine treatments such as tamoxifen reduce estrogen-fueled tumor growth and recurrence after patients achieve remission.
    Longtime dietary soy consumption is associated with improved tamoxifen outcome and reduced recurrence rates for breast cancer, possibly by improving the body's overall anticancer immunity, the authors suggested. Genistein also appears to inhibits cellular autophagy.
    However, why adding soy to diet after initiating tamoxifen therapy would diminish treatment effectiveness remains unclear.
    Reference
    1. Zhang X, Cook KL, Warri A, et al. Lifetime genistein intake increases the response of mammary tumors to tamoxifen in rats. Clin Cancer Res. 2017;23(3):814-824. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-16-1735

    9 Answers from the Community

    9 answers
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      Could be why there is less breast cancer in East Asia (especially Japan): soy is a dietary staple from infancy onward. But it's not exactly the same soy sold in the West (especially the US), not the least because GMOs are generally not sold abroad.

      over 3 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Also the older Asian diets include fermented soy (miso and natto and soy sauce and such) while tofu had been, until recently, a lesser used dietary staple, was brought out for either an ice cream type of dessert or as pretend meat for honored guests.

      Once the West began to process and manufacture tofu (an unfermented soy), its use grew tremendously.

      over 3 years ago
    • ChicagoSandy's Avatar
      ChicagoSandy

      Geekling, you might be on to something: perhaps fermentation alters the phytoestrogenic properties of soy.

      over 3 years ago
    • gpgirl70's Avatar
      gpgirl70

      What geeking said... my nutritionist said to especially stay away from soy products like powders. She also said that fermented soy was entirely different and beneficial. I don't eat any soy products but tempeh, miso, etc. In addition, it is important to know where the soy comes from - you want organic, GMO free products even with fermented soy. I could go on a long rant right now about Monsanto and soybean farming, blah, blah, but I'll spare everyone.

      over 3 years ago
    • DoreenLouise's Avatar
      DoreenLouise

      I have read that if you want to eat soy products they should be fermented and organic. I ate lots of soy products and tofu prior to diagnosis, having started to do so in my mid 40s when menopause symptoms began. I now avoid soy and tofu.

      over 3 years ago
    • DoreenLouise's Avatar
      DoreenLouise

      I have read that if you want to eat soy products they should be fermented and organic. I ate lots of soy products and tofu prior to diagnosis, having started to do so in my mid 40s when menopause symptoms began. I now avoid soy and tofu.

      over 3 years ago
    • Jamison's Avatar
      Jamison

      It is troublesome how little physicians actually know about nutrition and it's relation to the health of their patients. With my first cancer diagnosis in 2004, my cancer was ER positive and I was a Vegan. A large part of my diet consisted of tofu and other soy products. My Oncologist flat out refused to commit to an answer regarding the safety of soy products in my diet. My radiation oncologist told me the phytoestrogens were not recognized by the body in the same way as our hormonal estrogens, so they were safe to ingest and I should not worry. I did not limit my use of soy protein powders, tofus or soymilks daily, since I had received the green light from someone whom I trusted. I still use soymilk occasionally, but very little tofu at this point, and it makes me wonder if the phytoestrogens were recognized over the past 13 years as my normal estrogen hormone and actually fed the growth of the cancer causing metastasis to recur....It is doubtful if I will ever know but I do know it is my responsibility to educate myself to be more careful about the life and food choices I make. At least we do have more information now about the preference of fermenting of soy products and their safety for ER positive cancers. The availability of so many non-dairy milks, non-soy products, and organic foods, gives Vegans and Vegetarians, as well as nutritionally aware individuals, more options now than we have ever had in the past. Empowerment through healthy food options gives us a chance to maintain the strength to fight off disease progression and live a vital life with a chronic disease.

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Jamison, younger doctors may have had more nutrition education than the doctor you saw, or he may not have committed because the soy issue was "unsettled" at that time. Nutrition science course(s) are required in medical schools now, and there is also a board specialty offered in Nutrition Sciences for M.D.'s.

      Medical centers have Registered Dietitians for consultations and are referred by Primary Care physicians for various problems, such as diabetes and cancer.

      over 3 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      But GMO is spreading all over the world. bees, the wind etc, carry the pollen from one field to another, especially in 3rd countries. Farmers have tried to sue, but lost about this unwelcome invasion of their crops and land.

      over 3 years ago

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