• Port or no port?

    Asked by Warrior1 on Sunday, January 13, 2019

    Port or no port?

    28 Answers from the Community

    28 answers
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      Port-Yes!!!! Makes life easier for you and the nurses. It's put in you with a minor outpatient procedure under twilight and it helps save your veins.
      The nurses access is so much easier than them digging in your arms for veins. And a power port can be used for blood draws, contrast for scans, and chemo. It was worth it for me. Also read blog posts and other older posts about power ports. Many people here have used one and are happy they did. I am one of them! And when you are finished using it for chemo, you can get it taken out again as outpatient. I had mine in for another year once chemo ended. You just need to get it flushed every six to eight weeks. It's a five minute thing. A port is worth it!!

      about 1 year ago
    • banditwalker's Avatar
      banditwalker

      I believe everyone here will say yes. @cllinda says it all.

      about 1 year ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      Another vote for port. Agree with everything clinda stated so well.

      about 1 year ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Port, port, port, port. port. Say that with Forrest Gump's voice. I wouldn't even begin to do treatment again without it.
      Here is an article we posted a couple years about what ports are, how they work, and why you will want one. >>http://bit.ly/2iuQFkK

      about 1 year ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Why not a port?

      about 1 year ago
    • jvbaseballmom2's Avatar
      jvbaseballmom2

      Absolutely do the port. It was the best decision I made through my treatment process. Best of luck to you.

      about 1 year ago
    • lujos' Avatar
      lujos

      Port!

      about 1 year ago
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      Yes, get a port. I was so glad to have mine. It could be annoying at times, but when it came to getting treatments, it was the best thing.

      about 1 year ago
    • Gumpus61's Avatar
      Gumpus61

      I am a husband and caregiver.......Port is no big deal to me in case you are worried about that.

      about 1 year ago
    • Ashera's Avatar
      Ashera

      Having a port put in is maybe scaring you? Yes, you go under a light general and a couple of stitches close the incision - but then....you have such an easy time with your infusions. You do not WANT those caustic drugs going through smaller veins for hours each round. Like others have said - easy for the nurse to access the port each time, blood draws are done through it, you just won't have numerous sticks in your arms anymore. Mine was a bump under my upper left chest - and I had it 1.5 years. It was taken out in office with some lidocain to numb the area when Dr. pulled it out. I even got them to let me keep it after it floated around in some alcohol and I promised not to let anyone chew on it! (medical waste, ya know!) GET THE PORT.

      about 1 year ago
    • Warrior1's Avatar
      Warrior1

      Thank you for all the passionate answers. I will definitely be asking for a port. Let’s get this journey started!

      about 1 year ago
    • whatnext54's Avatar
      whatnext54

      Yes port. I was extremely hesitant to get a port implanted but doctor insisted. I am just about done with chemo and have had no issues whatsoever. It is convenient and saves you from possible vein collapse from receiving chemo into a vein from IV. You apply some lidocaine cream to the site before you leave for treatment and by the time you get to treatment you can't feel a thing. They draw blood, give pre meds, chemo.

      about 1 year ago
    • TerriL's Avatar
      TerriL

      Definitely port! It has made my life so much easier. I do not have great veins and was worried about ruining what I have. I've had no problems with the port, it's easy to get blood draws and chemo.

      about 1 year ago
    • Horselady46's Avatar
      Horselady46

      Definitely a port. Saved my arms and veins. It was easy in and easy out.

      about 1 year ago
    • HeidiJo's Avatar
      HeidiJo

      Yes! I grew an odd attachment to my port!

      about 1 year ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      We still have my port. I kept it for 15 years after treatment was over. I didn't want to have it taken out. Sort of a not wanting to jinx myself. I sort of worried that if I had it out I would get dx'd again. Guess what? 3 years later, boom.

      We have been planning of putting it in some sort of frame and making something out of it. You can google and see the different things people have done with them. Right now mine is still in a drawer.

      about 1 year ago
    • suz55's Avatar
      suz55

      I really appreciated having the port! My veins are tiny and move around, so blood draws are always dreaded. My oncology nurses just always had me do a quick deep inhale on the count of three, and I really didn't feel much discomfort when they accessed the port. Good luck!

      about 1 year ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      No question, no qualms, get the port.

      about 1 year ago
    • Russ' Avatar
      Russ

      Definitely a PORT!!! It makes it easier for treatments not to mention drawing blood. My best to all of you...Russ

      about 1 year ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I am late ... but definitely, port!!!

      about 1 year ago
    • MouseGoddess' Avatar
      MouseGoddess

      I have gone through chemo six times and have always refused the port. I've sat in the chemo room and watched nurses try to get the needle in peoples port while they grimaced in pain. Watched the nurses spray a numbing agent on the port to try and make it less painful....and then my mother got lung cancer and she went for the port and was so sorry. She couldn't lay comfortably on her side any longer and she said it hurt all the time. So no, I would never let them stick a port in me!

      about 1 year ago
    • Paperpusher's Avatar
      Paperpusher

      As a caregiver for my husband, I just asked him. He said yes! He didn't have a port and got poked so many times. His veins kept collapsing and they'd have to try his hands which are more painful. They'd call in a vein specialist. So more waiting and poking. At one point, he had 3 IVs hooked up to him in both arms. Trying going to the bathroom with that hooked up to you!

      about 1 year ago
    • Sheila5251's Avatar
      Sheila5251

      It's a no brainer (chemo brain humor), definitely get a port. Also, get the lidocaine cream. Put the cream on a half hour before your infusion and you won't feel a thing. I've had my port for almost 2 years even though my IV chemo is over. I have to have labs once a month and it is so convenient for blood draws from my port because my veins are small and tend to collapse. I wasn't given the option, my oncologist just scheduled it, so glad he did. Best thing ever.

      about 1 year ago
    • Sheila5251's Avatar
      Sheila5251

      It's a no brainer (chemo brain humor), definitely get a port. Also, get the lidocaine cream. Put the cream on a half hour before your infusion and you won't feel a thing. I've had my port for almost 2 years even though my IV chemo is over. I have to have labs once a month and it is so convenient for blood draws from my port because my veins are small and tend to collapse. I wasn't given the option, my oncologist just scheduled it, so glad he did. Best thing ever.

      about 1 year ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      @MouseGoddess, sorry your mother had such a difficult time with her port. Some people do have problems with ports but they are in the minority. A chest port can flip, and have to be repositioned or the site changed, they can also become infected, as can a PICC line or IV site . There are times also they stop working for whatever reason as can IV and PICC lines. Before the insertion of my port, they asked me what side I slept on, when I told them my left side, they placed my port in my right chest wall. If her port was on the same side she slept I can see why she may have had some discomfort. Overall though people do well with ports.
      @HeidiJo,I have an attachment to my port too, similar to Greg’s. I have had it now for 5 years .
      @Sheila5251. Recently I was on my way to have my port flushed and forgot my tube of Lidocaine, we stopped at a pharmacy but they did not have any. The pharmacist recommended Aspercreme. You get a big tube of cream, cheaper, and it has Lidocaine. Tried it out and it worked fine for me because , yes, I have a sensitive chest. I apply a dab one hour befor access and I am good to go.

      about 1 year ago
    • 2yearsncountn's Avatar
      2yearsncountn

      I LOVE my Power Port! I agree totally with everything cllinda wrote...I have received my chemo, had labs done, received a transfusion & had it unclogged ..many times over thru my port. 2 years out I still have it and plan to keep it for at least 3-4 years more, like Greg..I don't want to jinx it.

      about 1 year ago
    • SN406's Avatar
      SN406

      Port - YES! I was really scared about getting it but I have extremely hard-to find, "rolly" veins and there's no way I'd be able to have chemo if I had to have it in a vein every time. The only hard part of the placement surgery was having an iv first but once that was in, they gave me happy drugs & I was fine. It does hurt more than I expected but I think it'll be way better in another day or two. I hope. Two days out from my port placement and that, along with still recovering from the initial surgery, has me not feeling very good but it will definitely be worth it.

      about 1 year ago
    • petieagnor's Avatar
      petieagnor

      @Lynne-I-Am, it is great to know about the Aspercreme. I don't need anything on my Power Port for infusions. The nurse cleans it with alcohol so I'm not sure if it would work. Right now, I'm having a lot of muscle pain from my chemo. I have the Lidocaine patches which work when it is really bad.

      about 1 year ago

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