• Port problem.

    Asked by oceanblue24 on Monday, September 10, 2012

    Port problem.

    oceanblue24 posted an update

    Hi everyone, has anyone had port problems 7 months after implant 2 months after chemo ended?
    I did a lot in the past 3 weeks like lifting, pulling my self up into an RV, driving for hrs etc etc
    I've always had a picking feeling if I do to much high reaching with the port shoulder but it always went away.
    The Oncologist wants me to keep it in for a year but if it's going to bother me....... Any suggestions? Thanks

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Are you having it flushed regularly? I've had mine for over 9 months and haven't had any problems. My job involves a lot of lifting and stretching but it has never caused a problem. I would check with your oncologist. You could have a muscle strain or some sort of infection or inflammation in the port area.

      over 4 years ago
    • oceanblue24's Avatar
      oceanblue24

      Yes I just had it flushed about a week ago. It's always been bothersome & everyone I know says they don't even know it's there but I always have. Thank you for answering

      over 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I kept one for 15 years, wouldn't let them have it. I was afraid I would need it again. doc's kept saying it needed to come out, but I kept saying I'll keep it. Never had any troubles out of it, other than it wouldn't flush without a lot of trouble after not being flushed for a long time.

      over 4 years ago
    • SandiD's Avatar
      SandiD

      I had mine removed after radiation was finished. I wonder why they say a year? Did you ask? I kind of miss mine because I have tiny veins that roll, so I often feel like a pin cushin! I would think you could have it removed if you really want though. Perhaps you do have a muscle strain. Can the doc or surgeon check it closely? It might be good to ask the surgeon who implanted it for you. Good luck. We have suffered enough! I hope you feel better soon.

      over 4 years ago
    • ruthieq's Avatar
      ruthieq

      Everyone is different in how they heal around the port. It is probably the stitches you feel, pulling when you reach and pull. I am a port RN as well as a survivor. I would have told you not to do very much overhead reaching and pulling, nor heavy lifting. When you feel the twinge its probably a stitch thats pulling, kind of a reminder not to do those types of activities. its not a problem with the port, just probably annoying to you I am sure. My onc was of a mind that if one has responded to treatment and has gone thru radiation and is NED(no evidence of disease) then the port is not needed. It can be an added source of infection if left in. The Benefits of leaving it in must be weighed against the possibility of infection. SO that discussion must be between you and the doctor. It is easy to remove and does not require the OR to do so. It can be done in the surgeon's office. Hope this helps. I loved my port (had a double lumen) but was glad for it to be gone...

      over 4 years ago
    • ruthieq's Avatar
      ruthieq

      As an addendum, for problem veins, using the port for blood draws is difficult only in finding someone in a lab who has been properly trained to do so. The chemo nurses always drew from my port before chemo to determine if I could have it that day. But if you are at a lab elsewhere (other than a hospital) it is nearly impossible to find anyone there who can do it properly. SO if you are hoping the port can be used, yes it can if you go to a hospital lab or the chemo room...

      over 4 years ago
    • oceanblue24's Avatar
      oceanblue24

      Thanks ruthieq but my port has been in since Feb. & I've been finished with chemo for 2 months. I believe I may have pulled a muscle with all I've been doing the last few weeks. I will call the Dr. if it persisits.

      over 4 years ago
    • eweneek's Avatar
      eweneek

      PLEASE be aware of the risks and the symptoms of a blood clot associated with a port. A month or so after completing treatment I began experiencing shortness of breath, visual disturbances, vertigo, throbbing in my head and neck, all exacerbated by bending over. I found it difficult to breathe and swallow when lying supine, so I started sleeping in a recliner. My port site looked and felt fine and it continued to function without problems. My oncologist did not recognize my symptoms as signs of a blood clot and I was referred to several doctors and had multiple scans over the next three months. Finally a radiologist confirmed a blood clot in the large vein above my heart which the radiologist described as being "as long as a hot dog and as big around as a Twinkie." The clot had formed around the entire length of the port's catheter. The condition is called superior vena cava syndrome due to thrombosis. I was admitted for IV heparin and went home on Coumadin. I was hospitalized two more times with the Coumadin level being raised each time and adding once-a-day Lovanox shots to my tummy. The clot continued to grow and invaded my jugular veins and the symptoms intensified. At this point I am taking Lovanox shots every 12 hours. Had I received the proper treatment months ago, the clot most likely would have been absorbed and the vein would have reopened.

      over 4 years ago
    • Blue's Avatar
      Blue

      That would be tough to have a port problem. What is the problem? My port was inserted
      In a Palm Desert surgeon's office. A very quick, professonal procedure. No pain, no problems. It sure makes the chemominfusions Easier.

      over 4 years ago
    • Blue's Avatar
      Blue

      Does anyone experience shoulder pain? It's difficult to believe it is associated with pancreatic cancer but it started at the same time.

      over 4 years ago
    • Blue's Avatar
      Blue

      Could you stabilize it with a large bandage then try not to stress it? How often should a port be flushed? That is an important step in keeping it in a healthful and sterile state.

      over 4 years ago

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