• Port questions

    Asked by AlexisJ on Friday, July 28, 2017

    Port questions

    Hello beautiful people! I had my last chemo infusion yesterday (yay!!). I will start radiation in about a month and then 10 years of tamoxifen. My question is, how long did you keep your port in after your last infusion? Thank you!

    19 Answers from the Community

    19 answers
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      AlexisJ, this answer will be different for everyone, there is no one size fits all answer. I have a later stage cancer and a seventy percent chance of recurrance especially within five years ,so for me, electing to keep my port in for awhile was a no brainer. I have been very fortunate that I have had no problems with my port . I certainly understand those who want their ports removed soon after finishing treatment and those whose ports are problematic. My chest port was inserted in September 2013, so almost four years and counting.

      almost 2 years ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      PS, Big congrats on finishing chemo.

      almost 2 years ago
    • lilmom's Avatar
      lilmom

      Congrats on your last chemo treatment! I'll be having my last one next Thursday! Planning a celebration shortly afterward. I had my chemo prior to surgery. I plan on keeping my port until after surgery. I want it out since it sits lopsided and has given the nurses a hard time.

      almost 2 years ago
    • IKickedIt's Avatar
      IKickedIt

      Once I had clear scans, my oncologist gave me the "Congratulations, you're cancer-free. Get the port taken out." But as others have pointed out, everyone is different. This will have to be a decision you will make with your doctor's professional guidance. My oncologist felt that after I had finished chemo and all my tests/scans came back clear (which was about 3 months after my last treatment), that I was low risk for recurrence. So far so good, thank goodness. Congrats on getting over yet another bump in the road. Good luck with the radiation treatments.

      almost 2 years ago
    • Ejourneys' Avatar
      Ejourneys

      Congratulations on finishing chemo! And congrats, @lilmom, for having that finish line in sight!

      I wanted to keep my port for as long as possible, not only as a "just in case," but because my veins are so persnickety. I was so thankful that I could have blood work done using my port. Unfortunately, it gave me a blood clot and had to be removed 15 months after I had finished chemo.

      almost 2 years ago
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      So happy to hear that you are done chemo. It is a wonderful feeling. Congratulations!! I had my port in for almost a year and a half. I am HER2+, so that meant that I had to get Herceptin for a year. I was too superstitious to get it removed right away. I was going to get my permanent implants that June, so I decided to have it removed at that time. I figured since I was going to be under anesthetic, it was the perfect time. I never had any problem with it while it was in, and thankfully I have not needed it in over 3 years. With input from you doctor, you will know when the time is right. Good luck. Take care.

      almost 2 years ago
    • Marinace's Avatar
      Marinace

      Congratulations! Initially I had no port due to a Factor V ( a blood clotting disorder ). Then the Onc decided I had to have one ( veins were getting bad ) Finally it was removed 3 weeks after my last treatment. I am happy you are done with chemo and wish you a symptom free round of Radiation.

      almost 2 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I had mine for two back to back diagnoses and was very attached to it. (literally and figuratively) After I was told that I was good to leave treatment the second time I didn't want to let the port go since I had already seen how valuable it was. I kept mine for 15 years before finally letting it go. Then, I was diagnosed for the 3rd time 3 years later.

      almost 2 years ago
    • Nanzee's Avatar
      Nanzee

      My oncologist asked me to keep my port for a year after chemo. Said, with a wink, he's just superstitious. But I had a very aggressive stage 2, HER2+, ER+ form in several lymph nodes. My port doesn't bother me, and I'd hate to have another put in again. So I'm keeping it and hoping I don't need it. Congrats on being at the end of chemo!

      almost 2 years ago
    • msesq's Avatar
      msesq

      Woot woot chemo is done, congratulations!! I had a year of Herceptin for HERS2+ breast cancer. My last infusion was late June 2015 and I had my port removed in August 2015. I thought about keeping it for good luck but it was a bit of a pain as it stuck out and I had to use a pad with a seatbelt. I also didn't want to go to the trouble of having it flushed every 3-6 weeks so out it went.

      almost 2 years ago
    • Jouska's Avatar
      Jouska

      Congratulations on finishing your chemo. I also had Heceptin after chemo. When I had my last Herceptin infusion I asked my oncologist when my port could be removed and he said as soon as you can schedule it. It was out that Friday :) And it was a piece of cake - a little local numbing and GONE! Loved my port when I had it but so grateful to have it out.

      almost 2 years ago
    • Samcharlie's Avatar
      Samcharlie

      I had my port removed 3 weeks after finishing chemo. The port was uncomfortable the whole time I had it. Congratulations on finishing chemo!

      almost 2 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I was treated over a decade ago and ports werent what they are now.

      Mine fell out twice during treatment. The first time I had it replaced. The second time there was no need to bother.

      Yay for you. Get well soon.

      almost 2 years ago
    • SUZIE-Q's Avatar
      SUZIE-Q

      I had my port removed one month after my last infusion.

      almost 2 years ago
    • lh25's Avatar
      lh25

      Congrats on finishing! I had mine out earlier this week, two weeks short of a year after I finished. A year felt right to me.

      almost 2 years ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      Congrats on finishing chemo. I finished treatment about a year ago. My doctor has not suggested having it removed. It's a good question. Something I should ask on my next visit.

      almost 2 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      Congrats on finishing chemo. I kept my port in for a year. It needs to flushed every 6-8 weeks, and when I stopped getting blood work that often, and kept it up for a few months, but after having to have flushed between scans every 12 weeks, it became a hassle to get it done, even when I didn't have to make special trip down to the hospital. I took it out after the last clean scan celebrating 1 year in remission. I might have kept in longer if other areas of the hospital where able to access the port for tests etc But only the infusion center, ER, and the in patient hospital floor staff could access the port. It's literally and figuratively pain to have them inject the dyes and nuclear medicine through a pick line in my wrist.

      almost 2 years ago
    • SullyJackson's Avatar
      SullyJackson

      Congratulations. I feel you SueRae 1. I'm more fortunate than you in that I can have my port flushed, either at the infusion center or the local hospital as an outpatient. I love my port. This is the 2nd time around for me. The first time I had it taken out immediately but since then my veins have have become more difficult to access. This time, it's two years and counting.

      almost 2 years ago
    • banditwalker's Avatar
      banditwalker

      I kept mine after all treatments were done for another 4 months. And actually that was only because I had forgotten it was an option. I was very busy at the time.

      almost 2 years ago

    Help the community by answering this question:

    Create an account to post your answer Already have an account? Sign in!

    By using WhatNext, you agree to our User Agreement, and Privacy Policy


    Read and answer more invasive (infiltrating) ductal carcinoma questions.  Also, don't forget to check out our Invasive (Infiltrating) Ductal Carcinoma page.