• Prostrate removal coming in Dec and mostly covered by Medicaire A..Should I buy a medicaire prescription drug policy for the future?

    Asked by tomget on Sunday, November 4, 2012

    Prostrate removal coming in Dec and mostly covered by Medicaire A..Should I buy a medicaire prescription drug policy for the future?

    I don't have a history of needing prescription drugs, and it appears that Medicaire prescription drug coverage is mostly for people who spend a lot on a continued basis for drugs. Is there a possibility that I'll be doing that after removal of prostrate? I can buy a drug insurance policy right now..and for the next few weeks from Medicaire but then that opportunity will end as open enrollment will be closed for some ? time. The monthly insurance premium is not free! The cost varies depending on the quality of coverage, so I don't want to waste money on expensive premiums that only pay a little of the actual drug costs. Also I can buy drugs from on line places like Canadian Pharmacy..I've done that a couple times in my life..at big time savings. I have Medicaire in Calif which I guess can vary a little from State to State.
    Thanks

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • blondie's Avatar
      blondie

      Medicare open enrollment ends on December 7. Medicare pays only 80% of costs. Talk to your finance advisor about enrollment in Medicare supplement plans. Contact the local Medicare office for advice and enrollment. Medicare.org is a good online source of information.

      over 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      I just became Medicare eligible this month, so I have been researching my options the last few months. Bottom line, IMO, Medicare sucks. Not only are there huge deductibles and co-pays, but it is very restrictive in what and how often it will cover a lot of things. I decided to go with a Medicare Advantage plan that pretty much provides the same benefits as my pre-65 health insurance coverage. The premiums are less but I still have to pay Medicare part B premiums, but over all it is still close to $50/month less that what I was paying before and has full coverage (no deductibles, no copays, full drug coverage, and no restrictions on how often procedures can be done (like lab work, screening tests, etc.) as long as it is Doctor ordered. I am on one drug that is about $300/month, and that is the generic version, so that right there is more than my Medicare Advantage premium. It even pays for a free gym membership to a gym of my choice.

      over 4 years ago
    • SherrySwett's Avatar
      SherrySwett

      When I signed up for my prescription drug plan it was a toss up. The prescription plan cost about the same was what I was spending on drugs. About three weeks later I was diagnosed with mantle cell lymphoma. My Medicare Part A and B covered drugs while I was in the hospital but I had to take some expensive drugs for a while after discharge. I hadn't had any insurance at all between the time I retired at 62 and when I was eligible for Medicare at 65. I just thank the Lord I didn't need it then and I did have it when I needed it. It's not just cancer drugs but others that I needed at times that make it well worth the price for me.

      over 4 years ago
    • SherrySwett's Avatar
      SherrySwett

      I have Blue Cross of North Carolina, plan F, as my supplemental insurance and Wellcare as my prescription insurance. I pay $175.00 for Blue Cross and about $80 for Wellcare. These, along with Part B Medicare for $99.00 covers everything. I've never had to pay anything out of pocket except one prescription that wasn't covered. I see a lot of ads for Humana and wonder how the costs compare for the same coverage. Does anybody know? Both plans provide the Silver Sneakers gym plan which I take advantage and enjoy.

      over 4 years ago
    • Carol-Charlie's Avatar
      Carol-Charlie

      Who knows what the coverage will be with Obama Care but I'm praying it will be at least as good as medicare. I'm thinking perhaps to be on the safe side, you might want to take out the coverage for now and if it shows you don't really need it, I'm thinking you could always drop it. But then the more I think about that.... I'm not sure. Why don't you call your oncologist and talk to him regarding the decision. He should know what the usual patient has to deal with after surgery. God bless you and may your surgery go without a problem, and the results leave you cancer free.

      over 4 years ago
    • mgm48's Avatar
      mgm48

      I had mine removed in 2005 and until 2011 had few Rx. You may be lucky and not need much in the way of expensive Rx. Although you will most likely leave the hospital with some Rx for pain and bladder control. As I recall these were generics so probably no big costs at this time. Hope you never get to my stage where drugs can cost over $6,000 per month. Then you definitely need coverage.

      Keep it positive and smile :)

      over 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I don't have a supplement because I could no longer afford one by the time I reached 65. I've always been told and was completely under the impression that plan F was the finest available. When my Mom and my Aunt were alive, they each had supplements. My Mom's BC/BS was not quite as good as my Aunt's because it wasn't until i began to take over her care that she got a supplement.

      People keep telling me to switch to an HMO but I keep resisting. I want to be able to see a physician of my choice without 'outside' interference or needing a referral or permission for a second opinion. Until recently, taxpayers paid more to line the pockets of insurers which offered those Advantage plans. Those "free" gym memberships don't come cheap.

      If it is affordable to you, buy a supplement. Until now, I've been lucky in that I've either had the cash or the health. Right now, a supplement would cost more than my whole social security check brings in. So far, so good. Just MHO.

      over 4 years ago
    • Jake's Avatar
      Jake

      Tomget, I wish you well with your upcoming surgery. For those of us that have been in your situation, drugs can be an intregal part of the whole equation. Be prepared for the long run in combatting this disease!

      over 4 years ago
    • LuvinSis' Avatar
      LuvinSis

      If you enroll now for a Medicare prescription plan, it will take effect 1/1/2013. With Prostate removal in December you could run into needing medications in the near future. Some larger pharmacy chanson have their own plans that may suit you well. You need to enroll ASAP. And you can dis-enroll next year if you choose to. Personally I'd never be without prescription coverage but have cholesterol and pain issues that lead to 5-7 regular meds per month. I have a Medicare Advantage plan sponsored by my former employer that includes prescription coverage, it's similar in price and benefits when compared to the plan I was under when employed.

      (What'sNext participant as family member - my sister has lung cancer)

      over 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Sherry, I have Humana Medicare Advantage and the premiums are about $130/month. But this is a pretty large group plan through my husband's retirement, so I suspect the individual Humana plans could be more expensive.

      over 4 years ago
    • Schlegel's Avatar
      Schlegel

      You need to remember that each year that you do not have Medicare D the cost goes up. I'm not sure of this, but I think it is about five dollars a month. The bad news is that the insurance company can change what it covers in the middle of the year, but you can't change in the middle of the year.
      For those of you in North Carolina, I got this fantastic supplemental coverage through the North Carolina Senior Citizens Council with Mutual of Omaha. Plan F just went up to $138.50 per month.
      For those of you have leukemia, lymphoma or myeloma, check with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. They provide assistance with co-pays and insurance premiums.

      over 4 years ago

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