• radiation vs chemo

    Asked by Buddyritz on Wednesday, August 29, 2018

    radiation vs chemo

    My wife is getting chemo soon, so why not radiation too? Is there a reason behind that thinking?

    8 Answers from the Community

    8 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      There is usually a treatment protocol that has been laid out by many many doctors that is the standard of treatment. It has been tried 100's of times and proven to be the best route to take. Most people don't know that each doctor doesn't just pick a treatment method and run with it. They are using a standard of treatments proven and listed at ASCO as the way to go. We wish you both the best!
      Also, sometimes radiation will be added later depending on the scans after the chemo is done.

      about 1 month ago
    • Buddyritz's Avatar
      Buddyritz

      Thanks for responding. Joe

      about 1 month ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Radiation is rarely used against lymphomas. The tumors are especially susceptible to chemotherapy and/or biological agents, so the risks and damage of radiation are rarely considered to be appropriate. A relatively new drug, Rituxan, seems to melt the tumors away and no other measures are usually needed.

      It is only when a tumor creates a medical emergency by applying pressure to an organ, or perhaps to an artery that surgery may be considered - but again, the chemotherapy works so quickly that such procedures are really unnecessary.

      about 1 month ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @Buddyritz,
      Hello, I am an oncology nurse and first line treatments for blood cancers are usually chemotherapy regimens. Radiotherapy is used when a lesion causes discomfort, or a mass forms in an area that is conducive to radiation. All hematologist and oncologists follow the NCCN guidelines which dictate the course of therapy based on best practices. I hope this helps and the best of luck to you both.

      about 1 month ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Hi Joe, I have a completely different kind of cancer (lung cancer) so treatment is undoubtedly also completely different. Nevertheless, I thought I would share with you what my medical oncologist said about getting radiation and chemotherapy at the same time. He said that he prefers you do chemo and then radiation and perhaps back to the chemo (I did immunotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy), but not both at the same time. My oncologist says that side effects from both the chemo and the radiation are magnified when done at the same time and are much harder to address.

      about 1 month ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Here is a link to the NCCN guidelines that carm references above: https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/default.aspx

      about 1 month ago
    • Buddyritz's Avatar
      Buddyritz

      Thanks...

      about 1 month ago
    • Gymmom's Avatar
      Gymmom

      Hi Buddyritz………….My diffuse large cell lymphoma, stage IV, responded well to chemo. I did not have radiation either. I was also told that chemo is usually the first line treatment.

      about 1 month ago

    Help the community by answering this question:

    Create an account to post your answer Already have an account? Sign in!

    By using WhatNext, you agree to our User Agreement, and Privacy Policy


    Read and answer more b-cell lymphoma questions.  Also, don't forget to check out our B-Cell Lymphoma page.