• Since my diagnosis I have been reading that I shouldn't be eating candy, and other sweet stuff.

    Asked by PattyMarie on Friday, October 28, 2016

    Since my diagnosis I have been reading that I shouldn't be eating candy, and other sweet stuff.

    I have had a few people tell me that, but not my doctor, these people haven't ever had cancer, I think they are just repeating something they have read. So is there anything to this? I love my sweet stuff!

    15 Answers from the Community

    15 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      You will get a lot of information about this, the short answer is, eat the candy, just don't eat the whole box.

      over 3 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Sugar doesn't feed tumors. That's a myth. Enjoy!

      over 3 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Eat a piece for me, too!

      over 3 years ago
    • Ejourneys' Avatar
      Ejourneys

      What Greg said. The excerpt below comes from the American Cancer Society's article, "Nutrition and Physical Activity During and After Cancer Treatment: Answers to Common Questions"
      http://www.cancer.org/treatment/survivorshipduringandaftertreatment/nutritionforpeoplewithcancer/nutrition-and-physical-activity-during-and-after-cancer-treatment-answers-to-common-questions

      Excerpt:

      Does sugar “feed” cancer?

      No, sugar intake has not been shown to directly increase the risk of getting cancer or having it get worse (progress). Still, sugars and sugar-sweetened drinks add large amounts of calories to the diet and can cause weight gain, which we know can affect cancer outcomes.

      There are many kinds of sugars, including honey, raw sugar, brown sugar, corn syrup, and molasses. Many drinks, such as soft drinks and fruit-flavored beverages contain sugar. Most foods and drinks that are high in added sugar do not offer many nutrients and may replace more nutritious food choices. For this reason, limiting the intake of foods and drinks with added sugar is recommended.

      over 3 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Fruit has sugar. I love a sweet pear. The sugar pie/Seminole pumpkin I grow are sweet and marvelous. I make cookies out of nuts and dates.

      I dont eat Reese's Pieces or foods made with corn sugar. I stay away from all things genetically modified or chemically enhanced. M & Ms are not for me.

      Bell peppers, other than the unripe green, are sweet and juicy. I like to snack on them.

      I dont believe anyone ought to be eating most of the chemically based or enhanced crapola presented as food in a wrapper. I do eat commercial ginger chews made of cane sugar and ginger only.

      Best wishes.

      over 3 years ago
    • cards7up's Avatar
      cards7up

      Because of processed sugars, you should limit it at any time, not just when you have cancer or any other disease. Processed foods and fast foods should also be in moderation. But you don't have to give it up! As already stated, sugar does not feed cancer!

      over 3 years ago
    • nishhama's Avatar
      nishhama

      I am not big on sweets but my neighbor gives me a chocolate cake to take with me when I go in for my chemo... When I walk in , everyone in the room is thrilled. Just before we are all done , I slice up the cake and everyone is happy. Even the Dr. comes in for a piece. No , I don't think that sweets in moderation is a problem. What I do have everyday is a cup of Roasted Dandilion Tea. It tastes awful so I add a huge spoon of honey. The tea is know to kill cancer cells. You can drink up to 3 cups a day and if you do drink it every day , after 2 weeks you have to take a 5 to 7 day break...

      over 3 years ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      All my life I have bordered on low blood sugar. When I was diagnosed with cancer, my blood sugar went way low. I asked the Dr. about it and he said cancer feeds on sugar and it steals it from healthy cells. Eating sugar or anything else was at the time a moot point because I had a feeding tube.

      over 3 years ago
    • Lorla's Avatar
      Lorla

      There's a lot of controversy about this. I'm a sugarholic & would love to think sugar doesn't promote cancer. Sadly, I fear that's not the case. Even though even healthy cells need sugar, when we get PET scans, we're injected with glucose (sugar), which heads straight for cancer cells (& other inflammatory areas). It doesn't 'light up" healthy areas. This indicates that cancer & other inflammations attract sugar more than healthy cells. But whether it makes them worse or not is controversial.

      I've done some online research, & there doesn't seem to be a proven conclusion either way. This website [http://naturalsociety.com/revealing-connection-sugar-and-cancer/] had this to say after a more technical discussion: "Simplified: increased blood sugar levels could lead to increased production of this [β-catenin] protein which is known to impact cancer risk."

      Another [https://www.oncologynutrition.org/erfc/healthy-nutrition-now/sugar-and-cancer/] had this to say: "Much research shows that it is sugar’s relationship to higher insulin levels and related growth factors that may influence cancer cell growth the most, and increase risk of other chronic diseases. Many types of cancer cells have plenty of insulin receptors, making them respond more than normal cells to insulin’s ability to promote growth." [I've read this in several places.]

      I try to cut down on processed or added sugar in any form but haven't had the willpower to cut it out completely. You might want to research various websites & draw your own conclusion. Good luck.

      over 3 years ago
    • cards7up's Avatar
      cards7up

      Boise, I think your doctor needs to do some research. Take care, Judy
      https://www.oncologynutrition.org/erfc/healthy-nutrition-now/sugar-and-cancer/

      over 3 years ago
    • cards7up's Avatar
      cards7up

      "FDG (Fluoro Deoxyglucose is a type of glucose (sugar) and is the most commonly radiopharmaceutical used in PET. To begin the PET procedure a small amount of glucose is injected into a patient's bloodstream. There is no danger to you from this injection. Glucose is a common substance that every cell in your body needs in order to function. Diabetic patients need not worry; it would take 1,000,000 doses of FDG to equal the glucose in 1 teaspoon of sugar.
      FDG has a half-life of approximately 110 minutes and is excreted by way of the kidneys, so it is quickly expelled from your body. FDG must pass multiple quality control measures before it is used for any patient injection."
      Take care, Judy

      over 3 years ago
    • Vivbob's Avatar
      Vivbob

      "Life is short, have dessert first" has always been my motto. Enjoy your sweets in moderation.

      over 3 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Happy Halloween!

      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fludeoxyglucose_(18F)

      Apparently the PET scan uses a specially developed, glow in the dark, radioactive type of sugar.

      Nobody is drawing any conclusions as to what it might mean but cancer cells seem to have more rceptors, thus more drawing power, than healthy cells for, at least, this type of sugar.

      Cackle, cackle, cackle

      over 3 years ago
    • MsMope's Avatar
      MsMope

      You got some really great answers to your question. I had endometrial cancer (UPSC) and carbo/taxol chemo et al. My last chemo was May 2014. Nowadays, I like to add the disclaimer that we all have different cancers, different treatments and different experiences. I speak from my experience.

      I'm not explaining this in scientific detail, but it's true just the same. Cancer cells grow rapidly. That's just the way they're built. Therefore, chemo is designed to kill rapidly-growing cells like cancer. Chemo then also affects other rapidly-growing cells, for example, the cells lining our digestive tracts from mouth to butt. That's why (generally) chemo causes lots of side effects along the GI system.

      Based on that, some people came up with a wonky cause and effect theory that cancer cells suck up sugar. In fact, all cells in the body suck up sugar (carbohydrates). That's good and normal. Cancer cells, because they grow rapidly/have a faster metabolism and, therefore, use a lot of sugar. They're like people who run marathons - they need more "fuel" to run than a sedentary person needs to watch television.

      My aunt really ticked me off by advising I should eat fresh fruit rather than canned fruit because cancer "grew" when I ate canned fruit. I ate canned fruit because it was palatable during chemo's rough patches. I stopped taking her phone calls.

      Anyway, consider nutrition guidelines any person should follow - all things in moderation. BUT OTHERWISE EAT ANYTHING YOU WANT! You're alive! Enjoy it! -MM

      over 3 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Thanks, MsMope. Good explanation.

      over 3 years ago

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