• Skin hypersensitivitiy - what do you do?

    Asked by abrub on Monday, August 27, 2012

    Skin hypersensitivitiy - what do you do?

    I find that most tapes and other medical adhesives leave me with a terrible itchy rash that lasts for a week or more, even with using anti-itch creams (benadryl, cortisone.) Has anyone else had the same problem and found a resolution? Even a band-aid left in place for 10 minutes leaves a rash. Tegaderms, tape, you name it, I'll suffer after.

    9 Answers from the Community

    9 answers
    • FreeBird's Avatar
      FreeBird

      Hello. Have you tried Micropore tape? They used to use that on a family member in the hospital here.

      about 5 years ago
    • FreeBird's Avatar
      FreeBird

      (Micropore hypoallergenic latex-free paper surgical tape by 3M or Nexcare)

      about 5 years ago
    • abrub's Avatar
      abrub

      Thank you! So far, some of the Nexcare/3M tapesare tolerable, but not all, as are a few of the plastic bandage products (tho BandAid/Johnson & Johnson and I do not get along.). The catch is if I need a tegaderm or something similar. For my most recent surgery, my dr used glue on the outside, which meant I had no dressing.

      Has anyone else with sensitive skin found dressings that are okay or creams/what-have-you that relieve the itching and rash? (I received a couple of shots last week, and wouldn't let them put on bandages - just waited until bleeding stopped; the rash and itching are not worth it.)

      Fortunately, at this point in my journey, interventions are minimal - scans down to every 18 months, meaning fewer IVs and such. But the problem for me has been extreme.

      about 5 years ago
    • FreeBird's Avatar
      FreeBird

      You know who would probably be able to help you is the Ask-a-Nurse service that local hospitals often have. Nurses deal with dressings and different skin conditions all day long. I know that there are skin barrier and protectant sprays and wipes, various dressings and techniques for sensitive and fragile skin. For chemo or drawing blood, what they use on my dad is a little gauze and a strip of that Coban self-adhering wrap that doesn't have any adhesive on it.

      about 5 years ago
    • derbygirl's Avatar
      derbygirl

      I get a rash from using bandaids also and that is because of a latex allergy. My dermatologist did a patch test and found that I have this allergy. Talk to your doctor and show them the rash because if you have a latex allergy, it needs to be noted in your records so your medical team does not use anything made of latex. Even when I had surgery, the doctor had a separate cart for me that contained tubes used for anesthesia that were latex free.

      about 5 years ago
    • joyce's Avatar
      joyce

      I developed a horrible itchy rash from some medical glue once and my doctor prescribed talconex for it. It was wonderful and made the itching go away within a few hours. My husband was also sensitive to the tape and when I bandaged his incision I tried to ensure the tape had as little contact with his skin as possible. Not a great solution, but helped somewhat.

      about 5 years ago
    • abrub's Avatar
      abrub

      Thank you to everyone. I'm always looking for extra suggestions. For the most part, none of the medical people I've worked with have had any great suggestions. Fortunately, I'm not in treatment at the moment, but the tegaderms used to cover my port would leave me with nasty rashes, and there weren't good options. Some brands were better than others, but none was problem-free. I'm just trying to stay ahead of the curve, as I can't feel confident that I'm done with the tapes forever. (and yes, for blood draws, I ask that they use that wrap that has no adhesive. I avoid tapes whenever possible.)

      about 5 years ago
    • FreeBird's Avatar
      FreeBird

      One technique for the big shower-proof Tegaderm dressings that I noticed when I was reading around was they will take a hydrocolloid Tegaderm dressing and cut a window into the middle of it. Then they put that around the wound, place the gauze on top, and attach a second regular Tegaderm onto the first one, so that when they change a dressing, they don't keep ripping it off the skin. I thought that was pretty clever.

      about 5 years ago
    • Irishwarrior19's Avatar
      Irishwarrior19

      Opsite for sensitive skin (is like a tegaderm), paper tape and latex free band -aids work for me. I have very sensitive skin and latex allergy. I agree you should check if you have a latex allergy, if you do, you need to let your doctors, nurses, lab tech and dentist know. A latex allergy is serious and someone with this needs to avoid a latex.
      Good luck!

      about 5 years ago

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