• So......when someone tells you that they just read an article in the Witches Brew Magazine of Cancer Cures about a new drink.....

    Asked by Leukemia_WN on Tuesday, March 19, 2019

    So......when someone tells you that they just read an article in the Witches Brew Magazine of Cancer Cures about a new drink.....

    That has been "proven" to kill cancer, how do you handle this? Hit them between the eyes, run away screaming, ask for more information with excitement in your voice, tell them how stupid they are, or just politely say no thank you?

    Seriously though, what do you say?

    13 Answers from the Community

    13 answers
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      I normally ask to see any verifiable evidence that the "cured" patient or patients actually had cancer in the first place. Quacks gain credibility by first falsely diagnosing patients with cancer, then, miraculously curing them with their own rather expensive (and not covered by insurance) cure.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I was in Austin a few weeks ago lobbying for funding and a Tobacco 21 law. I was there with ACS CAN. We were all wearing Fight Cancer t-shirts.

      Some woman grabbed my friend and I and started telling us all about some miracle cure her sister or someone knew about. I think it was all about diet or something. I honestly didn't listen. I told her "thank you. I trust my doctor and my current treatment, but I appreciate your concern."

      My friend was nicer and stuck with her for a while longer. She was trying to help and she was convinced her way was the way. I didn't have the time nor the desire to get into a big discussion with her about it. She didn't even want to know what kind of cancer either of us had ... so I guess she thought she had the miracle cure for everything.

      4 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Given my 30 years or so of experience in dealing with "cancer things", I've heard my share of these too. I will blurt out what I think about some of these snake oil myths at times. Other times I try to educate the person telling me about this new thing that nobody knows about yet, except a few people in Southern China. And sometimes just say no thanks, I don't do voodoo. It just depends on the person telling me.

      4 months ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      I have never heard of this magazine so know absolutely nothing about it or wheather any of the articles have merit, but if a friend of mine were to refer to an article in a magazine with this name I would politely refuse. Now that I know this magazine exists ? Nope, still not on my reading list.

      4 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Along my journey with cancer I have had a few Wack-a-doodle friends who have offered me a "Wonder Cure" for cancer. My remark has always been "Wow I must research this further" And I do follow up and come up with a bit of research and offer that person a few reasons why it won't work for my cancer.

      4 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      Well, it's better than My aunt had that kind of cancer and died stories.
      Seriously, people may believe this stuff and want on their own way to help you. Me, as a patient I just said to the person No thank you. I trust my doctors.
      And walk away.

      4 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I answer a little differently if the person is a cancer patient and is actually trying this "cure" I encourage them to tell their Dr. about this "cure" because it may have negative counteractions with their regular treatments. If they have totally abandoned their treatment I encourage them to get a second opinion.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I read about someone - and it might have been here, I don't remember - who was on immunotherapy. They were doing fine, but then they decided to really change their diet and eat really healthy. It caused their immune system to go into overcharge and caused issues with their immunotherapy ... It makes sense that it could happen that way ... but most people would just think they were helping their drug work better (but not TOO good) ...

      4 months ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      As a practicing Witch ( Happy Spring Solstice to you all!) I would first be writing to the magazine to tell them that there is no "cure" in witchcraft for cancer and that it irresponsible and evil to tell sick people that their spirituality alone could cure something so serious! I would say that to any religion that touted that someone should ignore their doctor and come over for a faith healing instead. If the person wants to try a faith or energy healing they should go ahead with it but the person offering that should be telling them to continue their medical treatment as well!

      As to the sick people out there who want to make a buck off of people that have a deadly disease, I think they are should be prosecuted if possible. I think their ads should be pulled from magazines, and if it was possible have the spam from them sent back to make their computers explode. There are way too many ill people who will try anything to get better at a certain point, and it isn't fair for them to be bombarded with fakey stuff by their media or by well meaning friends and family.

      4 months ago
    • JMP's Avatar
      JMP

      Everybody wants to be helpful but if there was a guaranteed consequence free natural cure for any type of cancer we would have already known.
      As my wife’s caregiver I would get lots of unsolicited advice and emails touting the “secret no one is telling us about”. Usually from people who knew someone who had a relative who’s second cousin was cured 15 years ago.
      I would always thank them for their suggestion and file it away in the useless information drawer. However it did bug me, and still does when I think about it. Those well meaning people in my mind were saying you’re not trying hard enough. My wife and I trusted her doctors, because she had good ones, we researched, got muttiple opinions, traveled to find the best answers. She tried tested proven treatments and clinical trials (11 in 4 1/2 years not counting surgeries and radiation treatments) With the knowledge and consent of doctors we did anything we could to help bolster the effectiveness of those treatments. If there was something that could help her we knew.
      So please I don’t care about the thing you saw on Facebook last night. I’ll tell you the secret I know, “Big Pharma” would be in the witch doctor business if it worked, they are not because it doesn’t.

      4 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      I agree with JMP. If there was a natural cure, Big Pharma would be all over it to make money on it. After all, cancer patients need drugs and we pay for it with all we can. If there was a natural cure, we would be buying this cure through them.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      GREAT answer, JMP!!! I need to copy and paste it and file it away for the future.

      4 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      Fortunately, no one I know said this kind of thing to me, or even believed this stuff. I’d probably not hide my anger and disdain.

      4 months ago

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