• Stage 4 how long will I last?

    Asked by Jabo on Tuesday, January 21, 2020

    Stage 4 how long will I last?

    17 Answers from the Community

    17 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Wow, sorry for your diagnosis. I hope you are doing as well as you possibly can be. There is no direct answer to that question. There are far too many variables. And who says you won't last a long time until natural death gets you? We have several people here at WhatNext that were stage IV and given an "expiration date", and they are still with us today and doing well. I hope that you are one of those people!
      What was your diagnosis specifically?
      How long have you been diagnosed?
      What has your doctor told you if they have?

      Others will have something to say about this too when they see it. Again, I wish you the best!

      27 days ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      I had stage IV non-Hodgkin's T-Cell Lymphoma. Poor prognosis. Innumerable tumors (50+). After an immediate relapse, I was in a group with a three month average survival. Even after a second relapse and two additional cancers, I am at 11 years now. Have you checked clinical trials out? "Off-label" use of existing drugs? Are you at an NCI designated comprehensive cancer center? If not,I would urge you to consult at such a facility. Find the nearest center here:
      https://www.cancer.gov/research/nci-role/cancer-centers/find

      27 days ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      March 19, 2010, I was told I had stage IV esophageal cancer and that the tumor was inoperable. My prognosis was 4 to 9 months. Luckily my brother was visiting and took me to that appointment. He insisted that I get a second opinion. My nephew just happened to be a primary care Dr. in Portland and he might be able to give a referral. So we sent my medical records to him. He phoned back that evening and said that one of his patients was a thoracic surgeon developing a new surgery and the team was very interested in my case. I had an appointment right away. I am here today. In 2013, I was diagnosed with an aggressive uterine cancer. This time the prognosis was a little better 18 months and it would return. At that time I made a bet with the Dr. That I would be cancer free in. He chickened out on that bet and quit clinical work to do full-time research. Right now I am sort of between check-ups. There was a shadow on my scans last time and I am due for a follow-up for the second cancer. I also have to have some skin cancers removed. And guess what I worry about. I have moved to live near my son. I now live on a fault that is due a 9.+ earthquake, at the foot of a volcano that is due to blow it's top, next door to an airbase and army base that would be great targets for Kim Jong-Ung should he be so inclined.
      Oh and in 2018 I had two really bad falls and my Dr. says my next fall could be my last.
      My advice to you is eat well, get exercise and for heaven's sake watch where you are going.

      27 days ago
    • Dawsonsmom's Avatar
      Dawsonsmom

      BoiseB, thank you so much for your post. My brother is being treated for esophageal ca presently and just hearing you beat it gives me a brighter outlook. Thanks again.

      27 days ago
    • cak61's Avatar
      cak61

      My niece had a stage 4 melanoma at age 16. Eleven lymph nodes removed all negative.
      Ten years later found a lump on the back of her leg. It was removed and found to be the melanoma that had spread. During a year of having chemotherapy they found a lesion in her brain. A gamma ray procedure was performed but the doctor said it would return and didn't give her a very good prognosis.
      That's been about twelve years now. And after 10 years of clean scans the doctor gave her the go-ahead and she had a baby. Both doing fantastic.
      I know every case is different but there's always hope.

      26 days ago
    • Jayne's Avatar
      Jayne

      So sorry to hear that, Jabo. There are so many people on this site who were given a grim outcome (myself included - back in 2009!) so try to seek out survivors here and draw inspiration from them. Stage IV isn't always a death sentence!

      26 days ago
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      All our fellow warriors advice is SO correct. As you think of questions, write them down. You are the captain of your team. Make sure you are finding out all your options, not just what has been said or done for years. Get a second opinion. Many have had to travel quite a distance ( as I did) to get progressive treatment. Your doctor will not ‘have his feelings hurt’. There is so much happening in the fight against cancer. Deep breath, head up, shoulders back. Hugs!!!

      26 days ago
    • lujos' Avatar
      lujos

      Different type of cancer, but my good friend in Spain was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer and given six months. That was 10 years ago, her case has totally befuddled the doctors!

      26 days ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I was diagnosed w/stage IV endometrial cancer in Aug 2012. I am currently NED (no evidence of disease).

      26 days ago
    • gpgirl70's Avatar
      gpgirl70

      My mom got her stage IV diagnosis over 12 years ago. At the time of diagnosis, she could barely walk. After radiation, she regained her fitness and she is still very active today. She has gone through some issues with side effects of medication but for the most part has had a very good quality of life. We even went to Europe for 6 weeks back in 2013 and I had trouble keeping up. I will say she is constantly looking to the future.

      26 days ago
    • jdp746's Avatar
      jdp746

      I don't have an answer to your question, however I'm a stage 4 Prostate Cancer survivor. I can tell you stage 4 means that your cancer has spread beyond it's point of origin. Stage 4 IS NOT a death notice! The very first advice I was given by came from a breast cancer survivor. Her advice was to stay positive. I chose to embrace my cancer and stay positive. Research, call the American Cancer Society help line[phone number redacted] Keeping you in prayer!

      26 days ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Thank you all for sharing your inspiring stories! This is why WhatNext is a great place to get support, information, and a dose of inspiration!!

      25 days ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I was diagnosed in October 2012 with stage IV lung cancer. My doctor's best guess was that I would live for 4 months if I underwent treatment.

      My advice is always to live each day to the absolute fullest since none of us know when we'll take our last breath.

      25 days ago
    • Rustysmom's Avatar
      Rustysmom

      I'm sorry to hear that you have received this diagnosis. My sister was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer almost 8 years ago. She has mets to the bones, and has had her ups and downs, but is doing really well right now. As a matter of fact, her oncologist just gave her OK for her to get a knee replacement that she's needed for some time. (Many years of tennis!) This will help give her an improved quality of life for many years is our hope. Please educate yourself about the treatments, and be your own advocate. In addition to this website, there are some really good groups to connect with, like Metavivor and mbcn.org. Hugs!

      25 days ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Last November our community went through an earthquake awareness. It included an earthquake drill at several public buildings. I happened to be in one of those buildings during the drill we were all supposed to get under a table and hang on. After that I had my doubts about my chances of survival after a 9.+ earthquake. Then the local TV stationed reposted on YouTube a special on earthquake survival. My thoughts after seeing were "man there is no way I can survive that" Surviving stage IV cancer is easy compared to that"

      25 days ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Bottom line: We each form our own, individual survival curve. Someone survives every type of cancer. Aim to be that someone.

      25 days ago

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