• Staging

    Asked by KB2013 on Monday, May 25, 2020

    Staging

    Onc told me I may have new cancer ‘spot’ found on scan. I was diag. stage 4 nsclc 6 yrs ago but I’m told this wouldn’t be metastsis but, stage 1, (new) nsclc. Would this mean I’d have 2 separate lung cancers of same kind but different stages? Confused.

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Staging does get confusing, especially since it's different for different types of cancer. My Hodgkin's Lymphoma was different than my Head and Neck cancer staging. I have had the same type of cancer come back in 3 of the 5 diagnoses. Each was a new diagnosis, the same cancer different spot. No metastasis. Sorry for your recurrence and I hope you get busy quickly on a new treatment plan.

      about 1 month ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Hmmm, that's strange, @KB2013. Did they biopsy it and is it different molecular makeup than your original lung cancer? I've not had new spots, just growth of original spots so have no first-hand knowledge. I would have thought that if it is the same molecular make-up as your original cancer, it would have been metastases ... but I am definitely not a doctor so I learned something new! (I too find it confusing though!).

      Did onc say WHY it was considered a new cancer rather than a recurrence of original cancer? I guess stage 1 of a new cancer is better than further metastases of stage 4 cancer???? What kind of treatment plan ... or have things gotten that far? I personally am hoping that it won't be a new tumor at all!

      about 1 month ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      Thanks LWC...it’s all up in the air right now. Doc never mentioned biopsy but told me my options would be the usual. I’m confused for sure. Right now he’s not gung-ho to do anything, says we can wait so,...a mystery.

      about 1 month ago
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      Having lung cancer, a reoccurance, and a person who does lots of research... a big percentage of second spots of lung cancer are a separate primary cancer. Many times it is not tested far enough to know. Whatever, treatment needs to get moving... My wonderful team at #6 hospital in US gave me a small allowance of time then started with clinical trial, chemoradiation and then a year of 2 week apart immunotherapy. I am now in ‘active survalience.’ Get a second opinion!!! Kick it’s butt!!!

      about 1 month ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Biopsy! No one other than a pathologist examining a biopsy sample can declare it to be cancer. No, not even the most experienced oncologist on earth. They need to grab a piece of it and do the molecular work. At this point, it might even be a lymphoma, since that is a fairly common secondary cancer due to treatment.

      about 1 month ago
    • HerbGardener's Avatar
      HerbGardener

      I've had the exact same situation. NSCLC three times, three Stage I diagnosis, three treatment plans. I don't know why, but that's apparently how they do it with lung cancer. It was ruled out as metastasis of the Breast Cancer. The good news is that because I was being followed all the cancers were new. I had a round of radiation for the last one. It was focused, and quick and so far successful. I hope you have an easy go on this new diagnosis too.

      about 1 month ago
    • KB2013's Avatar
      KB2013

      2943, I am not a candidate for immunotherapy drugs.

      about 1 month ago
    • 2943's Avatar
      2943

      Then that second opinion is sounding better and better. I was at a well known and respected hospital in No Cal when I received my breast cancer diagnosis. The surgeon talked of a dbl masectomy for stage 0. Did not make sense to me. I went to UCSF (#1 in Calif and 6 in nation) and they saved my life. Found a stage 2 kidney tumor and a year later the lung tumor stage 1. Please consider. As stated above, you need the biopsy to know where you are and what your options are. Good luck and hugs!

      about 1 month ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I would personally hope for a biopsy because if it is indeed a new cancer, it may also have mutations for which there are targeted therapy drugs available. I don't know, though, if they prescribe targeted therapy for early-stage lung cancer.

      Like @2943, I've been under "active surveillance" for the last year. BUT, my tumors are original tumors that have been stable for quite some time.

      I have a friend, though, who has SCLC. They've been watching a spot on her lungs for several years. It grows a little and shrinks a little, grows a little and shrinks a little. She just keeps on living life :)

      about 1 month ago
    • Teachertina's Avatar
      Teachertina

      Get answers until you are not confused anymore. The fact you are asking these questions is an indication that further tests are needed to find out exactly what is happening. Insist if you have to! Get a second opinion if needed. After 3 times, I’ve learned to get answers. The difference between a met and a new cancer are huge when it comes to treatment options. Wishing you well, keep us posted!

      about 1 month ago
    • wmsavs' Avatar
      wmsavs

      I ditto everyone's input for a biopsy since that will offer clearer perspectives. @KB2013 you are definitely included in our prayers for a successful outcome. Please update us when you can...

      about 1 month ago

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