• Sugar Intake

    Asked by alivenwell on Saturday, January 19, 2013

    Sugar Intake

    Does anybody know if consumption of sugar causes cancer to grow faster?

    9 Answers from the Community

    9 answers
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      No it does not. This myth keeps cropping up periodically. He is what the Mayo clinic has to say about it.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cancer-causes/CA00085/NSECTIONGROUP=2

      about 4 years ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      On principle, since "hard tumor" cancers are essentially living organs inside your body, you cannot starve them without starving yourself. You can starve cancer to death, but only if you die of starvation first.

      about 4 years ago
    • leepenn's Avatar
      leepenn

      You know, this is a super interesting question. I've read a few studies in the scientific literature that are exploring it. The answer is.... stay tuned! I've seen a few interesting studies looking at using a drug that is used in the treatment of diabetes that demonstrates lower incidences of cancer and recurrences... Do we know that it's an issue of sugar? No. But do with know that it is not an issue of sugar? Again, no.

      The best advice is to talk to your health care team and request information about the ideal diet for you. Perhaps they can even refer you to a nutritionist with experience in working with cancer patients.

      I think Mayo is giving the best answer based on limited data. But, new research may uncover new data demonstrating that sugar intake is connected to cancer or may uncover new data demonstrating that, while sugar isn't good for us, it doesn't affect cancer growth....

      I can say, with confidence, that limiting sugar is good for you. If a person can minimize, in particular, processed and refined sugar, that's just plain good all around. Research has shown us this again and again and again. Yet we are still inundated with foods loaded with unnatural sugars and highly refined sugars.

      So, your question makes me curious. Are you considering major changes to your diet?

      about 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      The thing is, even if you don't eat refined sugar, anything and everything you eat eventually become sugar, because that is the only way our bodies can utilize what we eat as energy. I'm not saying that cutting out refined sugar isn't a good thing, it is. But neither causes cancer to grow or not grow.

      about 4 years ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      One solution may be limiting how cancer uses blood sugar. The question is, how do you limit cancer's use of sugar while not limiting the body's use of it? We have to have blood sugar to live. But, even if we do that, it raises the specter of the cancer then simply eating your muscle, bone or other tissue instead. Being on a maintenance dose of a recently experimental histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDAC Inhibitor) that essentially forces certain cancer cells to divide normally, I think that this may be pointing in the direction of the best hope against this disease in the near term. As well, a different HDAC Inhibitor (Vorinostat) has shown great progress against Graft versus Host Disease in the transplant world.

      about 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Hello, I am an oncology nurse and to answer your question malignancies absorb a sugar called sialic acid, a monosaccharide and one of the simple sugars produced by the human body. It is used as a marker when looking for metastatic disease. All cells of the body have sugar on their surface. The sugar we ingest is not the same. I hope this helps, Carm.

      about 4 years ago
    • alivenwell's Avatar
      alivenwell

      Although I do not have diabetes at this point, I thought it was interesting to be advised to eat simple carbs like pasta right before treatment. It is my impression that this type of food may prevent nausea; but I wondered if its immediate conversion to sugar in our bloodsteam impacted chemotherapy. It seems like there is an incredible connection between artificial sweeteners, diabetes and cancer in the modern world. I saw a special about specific areas on the planet where people eat primarily vegetable based diets. They experience no obesity, have no need to go to the gym, and are probably much more active. They average a high lifespan like the 90s or 100. I am really trying to give up diet soda and drink more water. That stuff seems highly addictive. And, I seem to crave sweets when I drink diet soda.

      about 4 years ago
    • SandiD's Avatar
      SandiD

      A healthy diet is important, but this a myth! During treatment, eat what agrees with you and don't worry.

      about 4 years ago
    • liznparadise's Avatar
      liznparadise

      My oncology nurse explained to me that everything we eat eventually turns to sugar. That is what all cells in the body need to live.

      about 4 years ago

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