• Terminal

    Asked by Brook on Sunday, April 14, 2019

    Terminal

    Once you are told it is terminal but you might have 3 years could that Chang to much sooner or later

    18 Answers from the Community

    18 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Yes, it "could" do either, but it could also disappear as it has for several people on this site. The doctor's estimate of your termination date is just a wild guess based on a set of circumstances that they say "might" or "might not" happen. Don't give up on yourself based on what one doctor says, get second or even third opinions from another facility not associated with the one that gave you the diagnosis.

      We hope you miss your assumed date by years and years!

      7 months ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @Brook,
      Hello, I'm an oncology nurse. That depends on you. A positive attitude will take you a long way. If a doctor tells you that there is no more that they can do, that's only as far as that doctor is willing to go. There is always another doctor willing to go further. No one can tell you how long you have BUT you. In my experience, it has always been that when a patients' will to live becomes a will to leave...thats when your time becomes limited. I hope this helps.

      7 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I was told I was terminal. 4 months. That was in October 2012.

      7 months ago
    • leshovey's Avatar
      leshovey

      On the 4th March 2015, I was given 2 months to live! I am still here, have had 3 bouts of bladder cancer since then as well as my original diagnosis. With the love of my wife and family, their help and sometimes I was impossible to live with, particularly when on chemo 24/7.

      7 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      It really depends. My brother was given 18 month's to live and he passed on 18 months. There's no exact science on this. It's kind of based on averages of other people with similar diagnosis. But continue to live your life. One just doesn't know .

      7 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      I was told terminal and that one of my options was to hospice. But my other option was to fight. I fought, had a year of treatment and am still here. Stage IV rectal cancer.

      Get a second opinion - find a doctor who is willing to fight for you and be willing to fight for yourself. We, Stage IV patients, sometimes must ENDURE the CURE. But with a good medical team, we make it - day by day.

      7 months ago
    • Gumpus61's Avatar
      Gumpus61

      Somebody has to beat the odds, why not you ?

      7 months ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Per the stats when I was diagnosed, I had a 15% chance of living 5 yrs. That was 7 and a half yrs ago. And today I'm NED (no evidence of disease).

      7 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Hey, Brook!
      We have esophageal cancer survivors here and many Stage IV survivors with cancer in different locations. Lead a healthy lifestyle and do what your doctor says, and we'll all pray for you, too! If you have acid reflux, it's a priority for you to take care of, as well as it is for me. (My cancer is stomach cancer.)

      Wishing you the Best!

      7 months ago
    • akristine's Avatar
      akristine

      No one has ever told me how long I have to live. I survived retroperitoneal liposarcoma and have been NED since October 2011. I survived breast cancer and have been NED since January 2016. I barely survived necrotizing fasciitis (within minutes of death from liver failure, kidney failure, lung and heart failure) and have been restoring my immune system for a year. I have every expectation that I will overcome all of these attacks on my health and survive so I can help others. Good luck to all of you.

      7 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Akristine, no one has ever told you how long you have to live because. . . .NOBODY knows that except our Creator!!! Doctors are cancer experts and in trying to be KIND, I think they try to give us an idea how hard we need to fight to get more time on this Earth, but it's just an educated guess based on our scans. Most of us dig our heels in and fight like the Warriors we are, so I appreciate that incentive!

      The long-term result is we all become more aware of our mortality, whether it be sooner or later, and we appreciate everyone and everything so much more than we did. Hopefully we'll enjoy some more time to make more precious memories. Then at some point Believers will be rewarded with Paradise. As LiveWithCancer reminded us recently, it's a Win-Win for us. (Maybe cancer is God's reminder that we all need to be ready to meet him.)

      BROOK, the above is the answer to your question, I think. If you want to share more information about your cancer, we may be able to help more. Wishing you the Best.

      Everyone have a very special Easter Weekend.

      7 months ago
    • Brook's Avatar
      Brook

      I want to thank every one for responding. This was so helpfull to me.

      7 months ago
    • Brook's Avatar
      Brook

      How much chemo can one person take befor your body can not take anymore.? What I am asking is there a limit to chemo that you should take?

      7 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Brook, don't be shy about talking to your doctor about your chemo. He has your medical records, and doctors sometimes make adjustments in the chemo after discussing it with the patient. He's on your team, and it's part of his job to help you with your chemo side effects or whatever it is you are feeling.

      Make a list of your questions and ask your doctor. He needs to know what you are feeling if you need help. Best wishes.

      7 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Brook there are many new alternatives to Chemo such as immunotherapy. I was told my tumor was inoperable but I found a team of doctors using a new technique

      7 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Brooke, please update us on your problem and if your doctor could help you. If you decide to get a second opinion, we suggest you go to someone at a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center because of the excellent quality of their doctors and medical centers. Also they are usually research centers and could have treatments not available to the general public. Ohio has one in Cleveland and Columbus. Here's a link to a list with their phone numbers:
      https://www.cancer.gov/research/nci-role/cancer-centers/find#Ohio

      When you discuss your treatments with your oncologist, be sure to ask if you are a candidate for immunotherapy or a research study. Best wishes to you.

      7 months ago
    • Terri's Avatar
      Terri

      I was told I had 3 months to live in June, 2009. Nuff said. Get another opinion. those words are so hard to hear. I went to National Institute of Health for a clinical trial. It worked enough.

      7 months ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Everyone here has given you great words of advice. Unless you came with an expiration date stamped on your body, no one knows how long you've got. No one. I has a 12% chance of making it to five years after my diagnosis in October 2013. That was five-and-a-half years ago... Obviously, I didn't believe the odds. My attitude was that if there was even a 1% chance, *I* was going to be in that one percent. You can join me - I'd love the company.

      6 months ago

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