• This study says that all men that are even suspected of having prostate cancer should have an MRI, saying that it would save thousands of

    Asked by HotRodTodd on Tuesday, March 20, 2018

    This study says that all men that are even suspected of having prostate cancer should have an MRI, saying that it would save thousands of

    Lives, so who has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and had an MRI or even before they were diagnosed?
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/03/19/mri-men-suspected-prostate-cancer-could-save-thousands-lives/

    3 Answers from the Community

    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      My Dad had prostate cancer, as well as colon cancer. But I never remember him having an MRI, but he was being treated at the VA, I guess he was lucky to get the basic treatments.

      9 months ago
    • fusilier's Avatar
      fusilier

      Hiya, HRT, been a while (my fault, not yours.)

      I had an MRI prior to surgery, mostly to see if there were obvious metastases.

      Not to get too technical, but there are serious issues with any screening tool, called false positives and false negatives. I have a feeling that there would be way too many false positives, that is, men who do NOT have the disease put in the "diseased" group. Then there'll be more biopsies to confirm.

      PSA tests are much more specific - that is, fewer false positives - and less expensive.

      My Two Cents.

      fusilier

      James 2:24

      9 months ago
    • BruceG's Avatar
      BruceG

      After receiving results from a prostate biopsy (7 out of 12 cores tested positive for cancer), I had an MRI to get a bettter sense of the extent of the cancer and to see if there was evidence that it had spread beyond the prostate. As it appeared encapsulated, I decided that a prostatectomy would be the best course of action. While an MRI has its own drawbacks (expense, claustrophobic-triggered anxiety and discomfort from that rectal coil), it’s results were more precise than the random harpooning of a biopsy. This was in mid ‘12, so I don’t know if there are better tests available. As my primary care physician’s initial concerns were triggered by sharply rising PSA numbers from one year to the next (not the absolute number, which was low), I’m still of the view that that test should be done on every man every year. It’s painless and inexpensive. Not one Dr was able to detect a sugar cube-sized tumor via DRE.

      9 months ago

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