• To treat or not? My Mom is 80 and has a Diffused Large B-Cell tumor. Sugergy didn't get all of the tumor.

    Asked by jillofoh on Friday, January 3, 2014

    To treat or not? My Mom is 80 and has a Diffused Large B-Cell tumor. Sugergy didn't get all of the tumor.

    She isn't strong enough for chemo and the doctor doesn't want to do radiation because it won't have enough impact since it targets only specific area and kills good and bad cells. They said we could do the non-chemo drug Rituximab for 4 weeks through an IV port, once a week. Without treatment she'll live 6 months at most. With it 1-3 years but she'll never been independent or return to the Mom we know and love. She would have to be put in assisted living or a rest home. My sister is caring for her but she can't keep it up as she has a husband at home and it's not fair to her to have to stay with Mom 24/7 since she can't take care of herself. Two kids don't want the treatment, two do, and I'm only the fence. Mom said she would do it but to be fully honest, she isn't able to make the decision on her own. I need perspective from anyone willing to offer their insight and experience. Thank you so much.

    39 Answers from the Community

    39 answers
    • KLC's Avatar
      KLC

      Tough one. I'm so sorry to hear this. When you say "Mom isn't able to make the decision" do you mean she can't fully comprehend or that she completely understands jbut just "can't" make a decision? It's a very difficult situation to be in to feel that you and your sister have to make such a decision for her. Just remember one thing - there is a difference between "living" and "being alive".

      almost 4 years ago
    • DeniseD's Avatar
      DeniseD

      My Mom is 87 and just finished radiation for the second time, no problems. 3 years ago she had 30 chemo treatments and radiation. I was very much afraid she wouldn't do well. She went through all the treatments with flying colors and I expect to have her around a while longer. She said, "I'm a tough old bird." When I had to go through the chemo, she was worried, so I said, "what are you worried about, I come from good stock, if you can do it, so can I." God bless.

      almost 4 years ago
    • DeniseD's Avatar
      DeniseD

      My Mom is 87 and just finished radiation for the second time, no problems. 3 years ago she had 30 chemo treatments and radiation. I was very much afraid she wouldn't do well. She went through all the treatments with flying colors and I expect to have her around a while longer. She said, "I'm a tough old bird." When I had to go through the chemo, she was worried, so I said, "what are you worried about, I come from good stock, if you can do it, so can I." God bless.

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Hello, I am an oncology nurse. Although Rituximab is not a chemotherapy, it is a biotherapy...a targeted therapy and many of them have proved to be very successful in the prolongation of life. I think a recent targeted drug for the type of your moms disease was just introduced in to the research stages so there are more targeted therapies on the horizon. The impact to the quality of life is minimal with Rituxan. I think you have to ask her what her goal is, and then help her to make a choice that closely aligns with that goal. Best of luck to you, Carm RN.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Rthompson's Avatar
      Rthompson

      I am very sorry to hear that your mom ( and yourself) are facing such a dilemma. There really is no right or wrong answer to this question. Whichever one you choose, you will forever ask yourself if you made the right one. I have asked myself this same decision over and over throughout my ordeal. As I was diagnosed stage iv cancer, my prognosis was not a postitive one at all. In fact, I was given a mere 6 months to live. After undergoing 30 radiation treatments in conjuction with 5 weekly chemo and 7 internal radiation treatments along with 20+ surgeries, I was finally able to achieve NED status. However, it was pure XXX! I actually spent more time in the hospital than out of it.I lost far too much weight, I had tubes in and out of body just to keep me functioning so I could undergo treatment.
      So, yes, I may still be here and alive to tell the tale, I am nowhere near the person I was before. I have had to redefine what is my new "normal" on more than one occassion. Sometimes wondering if I will ever know what my true "normal" will be. After all, it has been almost 3 yrs since I acheived NED status and I remain in and out of hospitals dealing with damage caused by cancer and ramnifications of treatments received.
      I know that if my cacer returns at any time, it will not be "cureable" any treatment I undergo will be purely for the purpose of prolonging/sustaining my life. So, I have asked myself would I want to undergo treatment for this purpose? knowing what I went through the first time, weight loss, nausea, constantly in the hospital for iv fluid or sustenance, etc... would it be worth it to buy myself a little more time? I decided it truly was a case of quality of life over quantity of life.

      While I hated my life as i went through it, I also know I would not be here if I hadn't. perhaps, the thing to do would be to try a dose or two and see how she responds to it. if she tolerates it well, it may be worth it. if it is too difficult, than she can stiop them. At least this way... she can say she tried and there will be no second guessing or "what ifs"

      I know my decision is not an easy one to make, but it is the one I have battled with back and forth, and honestly, I choose a different option each time I debate it.'

      While, NO, I do not wish to undergo this again. I also am not ready to give up my fight and concede victory to this disease. I have already witnessed so much more than I was ever expected to. Such as, my childrens' birthdays, graduations, entering college, etc. I know there is so much more which awaits me, things which I do not want to miss.

      I know that there is a vast difference in our situations as I am only 41 and your mother more advanced. But, the decsion remains the same. That decision...what is best for her and what she is willing to go through. If she is not ready to give up, than the family should support her will, strenght and determination. If she has made peace with the decision to accept what is to come along, than that should be accepted and respected as well. After all, she is the one who will be going through this! She will be the one enduring any complications and diffculties and living with the results of whichever decsion she makes.

      I sincerely wish all of you the very best in this most difficult of times.

      almost 4 years ago
    • derbygirl's Avatar
      derbygirl

      I would get everyone together and sit down with the doctor and have a serious discussion. Allow the doctor to discuss the pros and cons and then have everyone talk about their feelings. When you say you Mom isn't able to make the decision, I am not sure if she is unable to understand what the doctor is saying or she won't without her family's ok. Talk about it as a family and let your Mom make the decision she feels is best for all involved. In the end, it has to be her decision unless she has designated someone as her power of attorney and given them power over all medical decisions that concern her. Take care

      almost 4 years ago
    • lilymadeline's Avatar
      lilymadeline

      Please try treatment for your mother, if for no other reason than your own health because I can't even begin to imagine living with the horrific guilt that you and your siblings will have if you don't do everything possible to help your mother! And if it means anything I know a woman in her late 80s who is doing great after surgery and chemotherapy...they gave her weeks to live but she is going strong months later and it looks like she will have years more ahead of her. I'm just saying that you need to try, please try for god sake this is your mother!!! Please put everything aside right not and take care of her, forgive me if I sound harsh but this woman gave you your life and she needs you now! If there are 5 of you, it will be manageable to rotate taking care of her. I took care of my mother 24/7 all by myself for years, and I am an only child. And please is she at a cancer center or a community hospital? It is much better to be in treatment at a cancer center, for one thing there are more options usually available, and they have the top and latest technology.....and technology is really what makes or breaks it now with cancer treatments. Good luck to you and take care!

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      My mother had radiation at age 82 and did great. You don't explain why you think your mom can't make that decision on her own. We may not have all the relevant information, but for others to decide what 1-3 years of your mother's life is worth is a bit cold, if not immoral, to me, since she has said she will do it. Her care is a decision that should be considered separately, with everyone remembering that she cared for you all for many years when you couldn't take care of yourselves. To say you're thinking of not treating her because "she'll never be independent or return to the Mom we know and love" would be similar to an injured horse who is shot when he breaks his leg. Many people enjoy assisted living or a rest home, and many people with husbands have their parents in their homes, and make arrangements to have help when needed instead of 24/7 responsibility. Medicaid will pay for people to come to the home, too. If the doctor recommends it, you should morally do it.

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      As you said, it is not easy to make these decisions. I was where you are. I had a father at 81 with Alzheimers who could not make decisions either. We had to make the decision to remove him from life support and there were five of us as well. It's never an easy decision to make. I can appreciate your dilemma. I work in end of life care as well and I see this often. My thoughts are with you and I am here should you have any questions, Carm RN.

      almost 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      You are correct in it being a hard decision. I have been in your shoes twice. We lost both Mom and Dad to cancer and had to have this discussion with the doctors and them both, at each of their times to deal with this. Mom was near 80 and first had a heart attack. We never thought she would come out of it. She had open heart surgery to save her and the day I looked at her after she was out of surgery I kissed her goodbye, I thought that was it. Two days later she was sitting up in bed talking about how much better she felt. So for the part about she won't be able to, don't count her out because of her age. We don't know all the particulars of her situation so we cannot judge or tell you exactly what is the right thing to do.

      I wish you, her and your entire family the best as you move through this difficult time. I agree with some of the answers that say you should talk with the rest of the family and get a schedule worked out for her care and incude everyone's participation. We all have jobs and lives too, but when Mom needs help everyone should pitch in and help out. I hope to hear good news from you about this so please keep us posted.

      almost 4 years ago
    • jhale17's Avatar
      jhale17

      jillofoh

      I am 79 years old and I have had fourteen infusions of Rituxan with no side effects that I noticed. The prep of Benadryl made me sleepy and my legs restless for about one hour. But that is just me. Because I was not having any side effects from the Rituxan they cut the Benadryl dosage in half to help relieve the restless legs. I am not on Rituxan maintenance as my Rituxan treatments were a part of four occurrences of defuse large B cell NHL over a period of twelve years. I wish you the best of luck on your mom's journey.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      I just wanted to comment that I'm relieved that any judgmental, harsh, unrealistic and unempathetic responses were deleted from this question. Many of us - most of us - eventually are in a position similar to Jillofo's, as our much-loved parents age, and we face similar situations. Best to you and your family, Jillofo.

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @Carool,
      Thank you for your statement...I second your sentiment!

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Carol and Carm, I agree with you under certain circumstances, but Jillofoh didn't say what her mother's circumstances were---she said only that her mother knew and said she would do the treatment, so she isn't "out of it" and it's not the same as someone on life support. I think some posters could be wrongly assuming circumstances for her mom based on their own family experiences. Respectfully, Barbara

      almost 4 years ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      BarbarainBahm, I know what you're saying, but I wrote what I wrote because it doesn't help anyone to chastise someone asking for help, especially when we don't know the details. I assumed that Jillofoh knows whereof she speaks when she says her mother isn't able to make the decision on her own (I also know that people do underestimate the abilities of the elderly, but ...). Best, Carool

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      BarbarainBahm,
      As the poster stated in her original question:
      "Mom said she would do it but to be fully honest, she isn't able to make the decision on her own."
      To me this states that there might be a problem or that her mom is not decisional. With that in mind I do respectfully disagree with you. If we could all make decisions without the benefit of advise from those we trust or those with similar experiences would WhatNext really be needed?

      almost 4 years ago
    • Schlegel's Avatar
      Schlegel

      It should not be what the kids want but what your mom wants. I have excellent results with four weeks of Rituxan (same as Rituximab) alone and then quarterly Rituxan for two years, in remission for forty months, no side effects. Some people have had side effects with Rituxan. Oh, yeah, I am 69.

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @Schlegel,
      I agree that Rituxan is a very good drug with minimal side effects.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Carool and Carm, again with all due respect, you could be right, but I took her statement that her mom wasn't able to make the decision on her own as an opinion which could be biased rather than a fact, because she didn't explain why and qualified with "to be fully honest," which sounded more like an opinion. I'm sorry, but I worked in healthcare all my life and took patient complaints, so I'm just used to looking for facts and questioning opinions of family members as biased.

      With the few facts that we have, the bottom line is if I was the patient and I was able to say I would do the treatments, that NO ONE should say I could not have the treatments---certainly not for the reasons mentioned---that "she'll never return to the mom we know and love and would have to be put in assisted living or a rest home," or worse that "its not fair" for her sister to have to stay with Mom! How self-serving can they be?

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      To everyone, after re-reading the last few posts, my question is:

      At what point do we morally have the right to withhold treatment from another person, especially if the patient is able to say that they will take the treatments? Would you like for someone to be able to over-rule you?

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm (Best Answer!)

      @BarbarainBahm
      You are certainly right that we do not know the exact story and that is quite true regarding anyone here on this site. I too am a healthcare professional. I have worked oncology for years as well as End of Life. I have stood well over 500 persons at the time of death and so I see no down side to either scenario; I am also a DNR so not only can I talk the talk, I can walk the walk. People come to this site for opinions or support or to seek solace. As a healthcare professional, my role is never to give advice (although many times I would like to) but to give facts and education so that others can make informed decisions and then to support the decision that they make. I cannot and will not stand in judgment of anyone here...It simply isn't my role. If the moderator chose to delete a response to this poster it was done because the message given was not in the best of taste. I support this poster and her right to ask a question without the threat of being judged. I gave my two cents worth without any judgment. I have walked in their shoes with the death of my father. I had to consider what his goals were when I made the decision as his POA. I would suspect that this poster will do the same. I cannot say in good conscious that it is morally wrong or right to withhold treatments. My End of Life patients are anywhere from age 2-60 diagnosed with only two weeks or less to live. I have had many oncology patients and a large percentage of them die from the treatments and not the disease. For me, it is a XXX shoot. There have been recent strides made in therapies as targeted therapies have come on line. We now understand the genetics, the genome and the DNA as not just the blueprint to make us...but also to sustain us and I can see a trend turning away from traditional chemotherapies to these therapies. For the first time I see hope. But hope to me might not be the same for you or others posting here. Yet, I admire all who do...who voice their concerns and reveal their pain and glory to strangers in an effort to get peace and spread hope to a battlefield littered with the injured; those with the heart of warriors. Every post, every response is another forward step because we learn from them. I do understand your concerns, I really do. However, we are not here to pass judgment on each other, we are here as an army of one, united in a cause. Whatever our differences...here, we are one.

      almost 4 years ago
    • jillofoh's Avatar
      jillofoh

      Thank you for the responses, input, discussion, and perspective. Allow me to add some add additional information. My mom has a brain tumor (originally indicated to be a stage 4 glioblastoma, oncologist yesterday said she specifically diffused large b-cell lymphoma, which is malignant and very aggressive) that will return because it has 'tentacles' that remain since they were not able to get the full tumor during surgery. When I say she isn't able to make the decision it is because she isn't cognizant of her actions or have full understanding of her actions or decision - in other words she doesn't have the mental understanding to make the decision herself. So while she says she'll do it, she doesn't understand what that means. She has also lost the 'emotional' part of her personality - meaning she is very "flat" in her demeanor. She is physically here but she isn't mentally alive. And my Mom has been an independent and very 'plugged in' person in life. She has been getting physical therapy twice a week but they are going to stop because it isn't helping her improve. The tumor has affected her short term memory and so she cannot stay by herself. Right now she is in an apartment and my sister stays with her pretty much all day, everyday, even though she is married. Mom went to the radiation oncologist and medical oncologist yesterday. They are going to increase her steroid dosage as they think she may have some swelling. An MRI is schedule for Monday to include her head, neck, and chest. They do not feel radiation would help and said she isn't strong enough for chemotherapy. She is now to the point she can barely walk and my sister has to bath and dress her, pay her bills, prepare her meals. They said Rituximab would allow her to live 1, maybe 2 years (according to the oncologists). Without treatment, and I understand these timeframes are subjective, it would be 6 months. My Mom believes in God and has said she isn't afraid to die. If an additional 6 or 12 months of life is what Rituximab will give but it won't improve the quality of her life, is that reason enough to do it? I'm not so sure. Believe me, it pains me to even say that - I love my Mom very much. I agree with KLC that there is a difference between "living" and "being alive" and, if you could see it with your own eyes, you would qualify her as "being alive". I continue to welcome your input considering this new information. I'm truly grateful for everyone's response and well wishes.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Schlegel's Avatar
      Schlegel

      Thanks for the additional information. I thought she had only lymphoma. A glioblastoma changes everything. Glioblastomas are very rapidly growing and rarely does a person live more than a year or two after diagnosis. At this point it is a family decision. And many families choose to stop treatment without feeling guilty, but I am not trying to tell you what to do. You have my sympathy and my prayers.

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Thank you for the added information. Your first note, in truth, rocked me to my core.

      I have a cousin who was not ever a very nice person and who chose to not treat her husband. She chose, in fact, to not even tell him what was wrong. The situation was something like yours and she originally decided to simply let him die in hospital but her daughter made arrangements to take her father to her home. My cousin, apparently had some sort of teeny little dried up heart left in her chest and agreed to have her husband die at her own home rather than see her daughter go through all that. Her hubby was a very bright man. With his first surgery he came back about 85%, still clever but not exactly the man he had been, and some things simply went by him unnoticed where once he would have had some sort of comment to make everybody laugh or question. I asked him how he felt about things and his response was "85% good." I do not believe it was proper of my cousin to with hold his diagnosis (that the tumors were growing back) from him but it was no more my business than what goes on with your family is my business except that my cousin did not ask for anyone else's input.

      No matter what, you kids will still need to devise a sharing of responsibilities regarding your Mom. It isn't fair to leave everything to one when there are five. Whether she is at home (preferred) or in hospice or center, someone from family will need to be there for her.

      I still think you owe your Mom what she wants to do but my heart is now softened to you. When doctors told me that I could be "cured" I did not understand what they meant by cure. I thought they meant restore me. That is not exactly what happened although I am cancer free. You won't ever, likely, have the woman you remember, but it is possible there will be enough quality of life. Please understand that, for most mothers, simply having their children nearby is enough quality in life.

      Like your sister, I cared for my Mom. I did that for the last 18 years of her life despite doctor prognosis that my duty would be less than six months. My Mom did not have a cancer (that was reserved for me) but she suffered heart attacks and strokes and eventual dementia from long term toxic exposure to mold behind the walls of our then house. When the doctors gave up, I didn't. Using large doses of vitamin E and quantities of certain foods, we managed to keep the dementia slowed for four extra years before it was time for Aricept and then, after a while, there was so little left of her that it was time for her to travel to the UnDiscovered Country. She was in too much pain which is a different and not relevant story.

      My best friend, Doris, died surrounded by her children. She was very religious and ready to meet her Maker after being hospitalized. She hated hospitals (she'd had three episodes in one year prior to this last hospitalization) but she couldn't figure how to get out of the last one except to go to be with her Maker and, I know, she was so very tired. Her family and I still miss her. She had said to me, at her son's wedding "Well, that's the last one. I can die happy." I think she did.

      Nobody can tell you what to do. There are possibilities but not everyone is strong enough to go after them. Look up "brain cancer survival" on youtube and see the posts. People talk about marihuana and fruit and vegetable in humongous quantities.

      I wish you peace.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Yes, thank you for the additional information, which is what I was missing, but I knew others were missing information also. I'm sorry for your family. My own parents are almost 90, so I'm not far from decisions with them. I think my best advice would be to let your mother's doctor's recommendation weigh heavily, since he has insight into her prognosis, etc. Best wishes.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Carm and Carool,
      I always enjoy your posts, but maybe I didn't know what we were discussing, because I'm not aware of a post written in poor taste that the Moderator chose to delete. I'm not a scientist, so I don't give medical advice on therapies EVER. I take a targeted therapy myself (Gleevec). I just look at everything as a patient rights advocate, because I've seen elder abuse, patient abuse, etc., so hope no one took personal offense.

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @BarbarainBahm,
      I took no offense nor did mean any disrespect. We come together to help each other. Some people have other agendas but most often we are a family. Sometimes a family agrees to disagree but it does not diminish our respect for each other. That is what makes WhatNext special...our bond knows no limit. My best to you, Carm.

      almost 4 years ago
    • KLC's Avatar
      KLC

      jillofoh - may you and your sister summon all your inner strength to the surface and find the courage to move forward with what you both feel in your hearts to be right. When the time comes for your Mom whether it be by natural course or prolonged - may she find peace. Hugs to you.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      @BarbarainBham, no offense taken whatsoever, and I appreciate your comments and this one especially, as I knew where your post was coming from: your concern for the patient. As you say, we are a family (although "family" doesn't, to me, always have pleasant associations!). Anyway, this site is so helpful and is such a good source, and we all bring to it the hard-won information we've gathered through our Dx, treatment, and onward.

      Jillofoh, I hope your mother and the rest of your family reach a decision that unites you. Best, Carool

      almost 4 years ago
    • thatalguy's Avatar
      thatalguy

      Dear Jillofoh,
      What a terrible decision to have to make. My father had multiple myeloma, COPD, and emphysema. He was about 82 when he went to assisted care with minimal care. Although I had power of att. and was named in the medical directive as decision maker, my siblings were on board with my decisions regarding Dads final days.
      The biggest ethical dilemma is deciding whether prolonging the life is for the patients benefit, or for the survivors benefit. In my fathers case, the treatments were no longer working and his medical care became palliative care. We had many talks and he had indicated he had nothing left he wanted to do and was prepared to die. In the final months he was in no condition mentally to make decisions for himself. We got hospice involved (I cannot say enough good things about hospice) and their assistance made a huge difference in his quality of life at the end. I highly recommend contacting hospice, they offer many types of services, including counseling for people in your situation.
      I hope you are able to resolve this. I would suggest that all siblings be in agreement to avoid future recriminations.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Jillofoh, just a short-term suggestion---is your family aware that you can get people to come into the home to bathe patients and many other services, which could be a physical hardship for most people to do? I haven't arranged it myself, but there are home services available through either Medicare or Medicaid. The government has found that its cheaper to pay for home services than to pay for an elderly person to go to a nursing home, so will pay for assistance to keep them at home, which could provide relief for your sister.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Schlegel's Avatar
      Schlegel

      Barbara is partially right. You can get a home health aide if you are on Medicaid. If you are on Medicare you must also need a skilled service such as skilled nursing or physical therapy. I know this from doing home physical therapy for many years.

      almost 4 years ago
    • abrub's Avatar
      abrub

      My mother, erstwhile very bright and an award-winning author of non-fiction, is now lost to dementia. She needed an x-ray a year ago, which also showed a shadow on her breast (and she's had breast cancer in the past.) My siblings and I decided not to pursue it, not to put my mother through that ordeal, which she cannot understand. For me, quality trumps quantity. I know my mother would not chose to live as she currently is. Our decision on our mother is to keep her comfortable and address medical issues within reason. For example, she gets a flu shot because of her vulnerability to pneumonia if she gets the flu. We don't want her to suffer through pneumonia.

      These decisions are very personal. You and your family have to decide if you want to keep her alive at all costs or to allow her quality and dignity, while potentially shortening her life. Having been through multiple chemos, and knowing how horrible treatment can be, I know I wouldn't chose it for myself if it were only to prolong life for a short time. In my case, I resumed full quality of life, so the treatment was worth it.

      Remember - none of us is getting out of here alive. It's how we live that is important.

      almost 4 years ago
    • jillofoh's Avatar
      jillofoh

      I wanted to provide an update on my Mom. She passed away very early Monday morning, January 13th - 4 days before her 81st birthday. She has an MRI on Jan 6th and the tumor had returned and was larger than before. Within a few days, she had declined to the point of needing full care and so hospice was called. She was in hospice for 4 days and then passed away. Thankfully she was never in pain and all 5 of her kids where there with her when she passed away.

      I'd like to thank everyone who placed comments here for your prayers, opinions, for sharing your personal stories, and for your kindness and compassion. I'm truly grateful to each of you. I wish each of you love, healing, health, and blessings.

      Jill

      almost 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Jill,
      My thoughts are with you and your family. I know you did your best to help her to live a good life and then to provide her with a good death and I am sure she will find a way to thank you for helping her find peace and a better life just beyond that last good night.

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I'm very sorry for your loss.

      She died too young and I'm sure you five will miss her greatly.

      I'm sure that having the whole family together made her passing easier and will keep you five well bonded as she would have liked.

      Do right by her and have a very good life, each of you.

      almost 4 years ago
    • KLC's Avatar
      KLC

      I'm sorry to hear this news Jill. I wish your family love, blessings and sincerely hope once you're able to move past the hurt of your loss that the memory of your mom will put a smile on your face and fill the hearts of your family with love.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Schlegel's Avatar
      Schlegel

      May the memory of your mother be a blessing for the rest of your life.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Rthompson's Avatar
      Rthompson

      Jill, I am so sorry to read of the passing of your mother.

      almost 4 years ago

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