• Treating Stage IV Breast Cancer - Using Faslodex and Xgeva. Mets on spine and chest bone, PET/CT shows no increase, CA27.29 numbers rising.

    Asked by bcwarrioragain on Monday, April 2, 2012

    Treating Stage IV Breast Cancer - Using Faslodex and Xgeva. Mets on spine and chest bone, PET/CT shows no increase, CA27.29 numbers rising.

    I am interested in knowing what others have found with the treatment of stage 4 with hormone therapy. I am confused- are we slowing or killing cancer cells.
    Also, how does my PET test tell me that the tumors on my spine are decreasing & tumors on my breast bone aren't increasing if the CA27.29 taken 1 week post test shows higher levels?
    I am nervouse that we aren't using a good treatment.
    How long did it take you to see results with hormone therapy? What results did you see? Did you acheive NED?

    1 Answer from the Community

    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Hormone (estrogen and/or progesterone) positive cancer cells are able to grow and multiply more rapidly when those hormones are present. They do so by attaching to what are called hormone receptors on the cancer cells. The objective of hormone therapy is to reduce the amount of those hormones in your body, thereby slowing the growth of cancer cells and preventing the mutation of healthy cells into cancer preventing the hormones from attaching to them. As such, hormone therapy alone does not cure existing cancer. It is generally used to slow existing cancer and/or prevent recurrence of hormone susceptible cancers.

      A PET scan shows metabolic activity. High metabolic activity in unexpected areas are an indication of cancer growth.,

      CA27.29 is a tumor marker found in the blood. In addition to breast cancer, they can be elevated from other conditions such as kidney or liver disease.

      I would definitely discuss your concerns with your oncologist. Is your treatment plan designed to be curative or is it palliative?

      almost 5 years ago

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