• Treatment delay

    Asked by Grampy on Friday, May 30, 2014

    Treatment delay

    I had a semi-routine CT scan done and large masses were discovered on my kidney and lung. I waited 2 weeks to see my urologist who referred me to a kidney cancer specialist. I waited another 3 weeks to see the new guy, who wants a better CT scan plus a bone scan. The new scans were scheduled for 4 weeks later. It will soon be 9 weeks since the masses were detected and still no firm diagnosis and no treatment of any kind. Many people (including several other physicians and nurses) have told me that this kidney guy is the best around, but the delay seems overly long. Is this normal?

    9 Answers from the Community

    9 answers
    • serenity101's Avatar
      serenity101

      Seems like delays are common, especially early on. If you want to try to get in earlier, call the clinic and ask how they handle cancellations. At my clinic they said I could call as often as I wanted to check if anything had opened up. I was able to get in much earlier that way.

      over 5 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      It seems like someone should be able to advocate for you and get things done quicker. My primary care doctor made sure things happened very, very quickly in the beginning. Now, my oncologist makes sure there isn't a long weight. If there's no one there to advocate for you, do it for yourself! Maybe explain why you feel the urgency. I would be wanting every test as quickly as possible so treatment, if needed, could begin ASAP. Good luck!

      over 5 years ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      When I was first getting diagnosed, the scan center called to set up my appointment and I let them know I was available if anyone cancelled. Can you do that? It didn't get me in a lot sooner, but it gave me something to do and did move my initial scan up by a full day.

      Good luck!

      over 5 years ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Everyone told me that I really needed to hurry. I got an oncologist that said that, but nothing was being done. I decided on another type of treatment, because I could start treatment sooner and the treatment isn't so brutal. Keep calling the office about cancellations, and let them know you're serious. Work at it. As far as telling them you're anxious-absolutely everyone is.

      Good luck---

      over 5 years ago
    • GENMAR47's Avatar
      GENMAR47

      I had stage 1 RCC, which was found in late July 2013. I was blessed by having all my tests and surgery completed by Sept 2013. In the world of cancer treatment, this was super fast. Didn't need any chemo/radiation. Am clear of kidney cancer as of last CT scan. Still have prostate cancer.
      This is about you and your life. Ask for copies of all your tests, diagnoses, and learn to read them. If you don't understand, ask someone. Research and find everything you can. Plenty of good sites with info on line. Just avoid the garbage. You have a right to be scared and anxious. You need to advocate for yourself and build a good support network of friends and family if you can. I believe that is vital for anyone with cancer. Arm yourself with all the knowledge you can.

      over 5 years ago
    • GENMAR47's Avatar
      GENMAR47

      To finish above post, Let the doctors know you are anxious and get them to explain what they are doing and why.
      I think the better CT he wants is a CT with contrast (had 2).This scan shows whether the masses are enhancing or non-enhancing. This means it either has its own blood supply system (enhancing) or it doesn't (non-enhancing). Cancers usually develop their own vascular system so they can steal more nutrients from the body and continue to grow. Cancer cells never die like normal cells. They have to be killed by the immune system or treatment. I had 4 masses (cysts) on my left kidney, all non-enhancing and a 2 cm x 2 cm mass in my right kidney which was enhancing. When removed, it was malignant. The bone scan he wants is probably to check for metastasis of the cancer, if it is cancer. That means it may have spread to the bones. This is my layman's understanding of how these things work.
      Hope it helps. Hang in there.

      over 5 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I went to my primary care doctor at the very end of October 2012 for something totally unrelated. I was a first-time patient. She detected a knot and had me getting a CT that same day. As soon as she got the results, she set me up for a PET scan.
      That took a few days while she got insurance approval. I had the scan and waited about a qeek for her to call to tell me I had lung cancer and that I had an appointment the following day with an oncologist. My first chemo treatment was on 12/5/2012. It took about 5 weeks from discovery to treatment beginning.

      over 5 years ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      There is TIME as the cancer probably has been growing (If It's Cancer) for many years. BUT be an advocate and don't be afraid of making your Docs Angry. Sometimes we need to be pushy and if they get mad so be it. They make enough money so don't worry about it.
      If THEY Had cancer they'd want action too...ugh!

      over 5 years ago
    • cam32505's Avatar
      cam32505

      I had a long delay from my initial consult to surgery (about 3.5 weeks). My gyn onc reassured me that the wait wasn't making the cancer any more advanced than it already was. I do believe that we have cancer long before we have symptoms and seek treatment, so a few weeks or even months probably does not alter the outcome. But, I know you're anxious to get something going.

      over 5 years ago

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