• Tumor markers

    Asked by Beccanan on Sunday, May 11, 2014

    Tumor markers

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • lilymadeline's Avatar
      lilymadeline

      What is your question? There are a couple of tumor markers generally taken for breast cancer patients and I have mine taken every Friday but I am stage IV. Also as your oncologist gets to know you he will figure out how sensitive you are to that test, because some patients have very accurate tumor markers and show immediately if the cancer is acting up and other patients don't have accurate tumor markers. Just the way it is. We also need scans of course, there are several ways to tell how active the cancer is or isn't.

      over 7 years ago
    • cam32505's Avatar
      cam32505

      I have tumor markers for both uterine and thyroid cancer. This helps the onc monitor us without the need for expensive, time-consuming scans (saving us money and radiation). When these markers start to change, the onc know something is going on and will order scans as deemed appropriate.

      over 7 years ago
    • Beccanan's Avatar
      Beccanan

      Thank you. My daughter has not been told about tumor markers. She is still in chemo then radiation. How do they do this?

      over 7 years ago
    • Beccanan's Avatar
      Beccanan

      All of you are so wonderful and brave

      over 7 years ago
    • DOS's Avatar
      DOS

      Hi Beccanan -

      You may want to look at this website for lots of information on markers:
      http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/tumor-markers

      In my case (beast cancer - oh my, talk about a wild typo!) BREAST cancer, some of the usual tests were done by examining the tissue removed at surgery. These help the doctors determine what medications are most likely to work for each individual patient.

      My oncologist routinely runs the CA27-29 and the CEA for all new patients; she ran the first set even before surgery, to get a baseline. The CA27-29 turned out not to be a reliable test for me. It started out within the normal range, and the results never changed all during treatment. The CEA, on the other hand, turned out to be very predictive for me. Normal range is up to 6. I was at 88 before surgery, 41 after surgery (but before chemo), 17 halfway through chemo, and 4.7 after chemo was complete. It's a simple blood test, and I have it done every few months. Continuing to get normal results seems to be a reliable indicator for me, avoids routine scans, and makes me pretty comfortable that the cancer hasn't returned.

      Your daughter's doctor may have run some of these tests already, and just hasn't mentioned them to her. Please suggest that she ask the doctor what tests have been done, and what the results have been.

      Best wishes to both of you.
      Donna

      "You never know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have."

      over 7 years ago
    • Beccanan's Avatar
      Beccanan

      Thank you everyone. I will check the site and talk to my daughter. Could she know and not understand or they haven't told her?

      over 7 years ago
    • baridirects' Avatar
      baridirects

      There's a lot of controversy out there about tumor markers - which ones make sense to do, when baselines should be established, how often should they be checked. It's absolutely true that there can be variability in the results, and the more general markers, such as CEA, can be elevated for reasons other than the spread of the disease. In addition, there are certainly documented cases where patients have had active disease, but the markers remained normal, so you have to take results with a bit of a grain of salt.

      The focus from the oncologist's viewpoint is not individual results, but rather how that data trends over time. I didn't have my baseline markers drawn until after my primary treatment was completed. Then, some months later, they were drawn again - a rise in my CA 15-3 is what led them to discover that my disease had progressed into my bones. Now, I have them drawn monthly as a way for my oncologist to monitor the effects of my ongoing treatment.

      My very best to your daughter on her journey-

      Namaste,
      Christine

      over 7 years ago
    • Beccanan's Avatar
      Beccanan

      Thank you. Now I think I understand. Praying for all of you

      over 7 years ago
    • rtburg's Avatar
      rtburg

      I was looking at my blood test results and noticed that they tested for tumor markers. No one had discussed it with me, I just saw it on the test results. It is likely that your daughter has been tested but not told about it, maybe because there is nothing yet to discuss.

      over 7 years ago
    • Beccanan's Avatar
      Beccanan

      Thanks. That sounds good. Maybe there are no more tumors. Nancy. Healing for all of you from God

      over 7 years ago
    • Beccanan's Avatar
      Beccanan

      Maybe that don't give blood tests results for patients. They just say that things are good. Thanks again. This is a hard journey to beat the old devil cancer

      over 7 years ago

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