• tumor profiling

    Asked by ColoradoCathy on Thursday, April 25, 2013

    tumor profiling

    I have recurrent andenocarcinoma endometrial cancer that has spread to my lungs. I am currently receiving Doxil chemotherapy and after 2 rounds I am holding my own, i.e. no further spread. However, I am thinking down the road about tumor profiling if Doxil doesn't do the job. Does anyone have experience with this and if so, who or what entity did you go through to have it done?Several women I know with ovarian cancer have had tumor profiling done for free through an ovarian foundation (clearity) but they accept only ovarian cancer patients. Thanks!

    6 Answers from the Community

    6 answers
    • CAS1's Avatar
      CAS1

      yes, I have had two profiles done. The first was for a hand full of mutations and the second was for 220. It was the second group that found two mutations that both have drugs to treat them.

      I am currently cancer free so if my cancer returns this is helpful information however there is still a chance that a cancer return could mean diffrent mutations.

      Did you see the link I posted about freezing mets to the lung from a primary cancer?

      Insurance covers the majority of the cost..mine were 10 k and we paid 3500.

      about 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      ColoradoCathy,
      I am an oncology nurse that specializes in gyne cancers. I know these tests are expensive. I have a few tricks left in me to help you with this, but today I am attaching a link to you from a company that will help get your insurance approval. If you like, you should also check out information from other gyne patients at the Foundation For Womens Cancer website. If the Doxil does become ineffective and you cannot secure the needs to be tested from the resources here, let me know and I can further assist you. Stay Teal Tough!! Carm RN.

      http://biospecifx.com/patients/an-open-letter-to-patients-regarding-biospecifx%C2%AE-and-chemofx%C2%AE/

      about 4 years ago
    • anskysue's Avatar
      anskysue

      Can someone explain what tumor profiling is?

      about 4 years ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      @anskysue,
      Sure, I can help you with that. Basically before tumor profiling (also called Molecular tumor profiling), when a patient was diagnosed it was through the histology or what the tissue looks like under a microscope. It is limited in that it relies on the subjective interpretation of a pathologist. It can't tell you anything except that it is cancer by the gross appearance of cells. With Molecular tumor profiling, you go deeper to the molecular level and are able to find the source; what chromosome carries the mutation, what kind of mutation, what receptor it triggered or enzyme is affected. Through this information it is easier to determine its potential to metastasize, its response to a specific drug, and the probability of recurrence. There are certain mutations that are just missteps or translocations, where an amino acid or nucleotide is switched with another, but then there is wild-type mutations and these are harder to corral and disarm. It is with the use of tumor profiling that biochemists now tailor drug to disease as you now see with targeted therapy. As an example: GIST are Gastro-Intestinal Stromal Tumors. They occur as a result of a KIT mutation that occurs on the 4th chromosome at precisely the long arm (q) at the 12th band. It is usually a misstep mutation. The amino acid that is effected is tyrosine kinase. It gives off a signal to the surrounding tissue to start making a tumor and allows it to continue as long as that signal is on. The signal is inside the cell on the surface of the nucleus. To shut it off, you need a drug to go inside the cell to the nucleus and bind to the receptor to shut it off, like a key to a lock. The targeted drug used most to treat GIST is Sutent. The chemical names of these targeted drugs tell you what they do by the last two letters in the chemical name. Sutent is Sunitinib and IB means it is an Internal Binding drug. Sutent inhibits kinase by binding to that internal receptor. So you can see the advantage of molecular tumor profiling. This is where cancer research is headed. I hope this was not too dry, and gave you a clearer picture. I commend you for asking the question. If you can understand your disease from this level, you will be able to understand the rationale for the treatment offered to you. Best of luck, Carm RN.

      about 4 years ago
    • CAS1's Avatar
      CAS1

      You can also go to "Let's test now" for more information on tumor profiling..
      This is an important tool in the future of cancer care and treatment. Many many cancers have similar mutations. We now know that Lung cancer also has Her-2 and drugs are now helping people with this mutation.

      about 4 years ago
    • ColoradoCathy's Avatar
      ColoradoCathy

      To all of you who took the time to answer my question, many thanks. And I appreciate the question "what is tumor profiling?" because I sure learned alot in the answer!

      about 4 years ago

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