• WhatNextEmails' Avatar

    We get emails asking about all sorts of cancer topics, this one was the old "Cancer Feeds off of Sugar" debate.

    Asked by WhatNextEmails on Monday, February 19, 2018

    We get emails asking about all sorts of cancer topics, this one was the old "Cancer Feeds off of Sugar" debate.

    I happened to see another article on this subject today from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

    No Sugar, No Cancer? A Look at the Evidence

    https://www.mskcc.org/blog/no-sugar-no-cancer-look-evidence

    12 Answers from the Community

    12 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I was at a meeting a week or two ago where they mentioned a new study that suggests there is a connection after all. I haven't seen the actual report and I forget which hospital was involved. It WAS an oncologist that alluded to the new study. I was very surprised and am interested to see more.

      4 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      This has been studied by everyone that has a desk. They all keep coming up with the same thing. Eat a balanced diet, you don't have to STOP all sugar but lower it to a healthy level to reduce obesity. Even if you were to stop eating sugar altogether, your body would just manufacture it. Most headlines will twist the words a little to make people click, but it's all the same.

      4 months ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      I am living proof of a connection.

      6 months on an ice cream diet grew me and the tumor to a size where it & I no longer looked quite so healthy and the tumor was big enough for a doc to finally deign to remove it.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Greg, they were saying that the study this one fellow did about sugar and cancer might get him the Nobel Prize. It might ??? be new information. I am skeptical, but the oncologist talking about it was quite impressed. I want to say it is a researcher at Cornell that has come out with the new information, but I am not 1000% sure about what hospital.

      4 months ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      Keep BS low normal all day. High insulin levels stimulate tumor growth. Eat Live Foods for sugar with the fiber. Cancer cell receptors have way more than normal for the insulin with the simple sugar. So it's not the sugar it's the quick simple sugars with no fiber.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I am doing some research for a blog post. I came across the following article by Cancer Research UK about sugar and cancer. It is pretty interesting.

      http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2017/05/15/sugar-and-cancer-what-you-need-to-know/

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Here are some quotes from the article linked in the post above:

      Cancer cells usually grow quickly, multiplying at a fast rate, which takes a lot of energy. This means they need lots of glucose. Cancer cells also need lots of other nutrients too, such as amino acids and fats; it’s not just sugar they crave.

      Here’s where the myth that sugar fuels cancer was born: if cancer cells need lots of glucose, then cutting sugar out of our diet must help stop cancer growing, and could even stop it developing in the first place. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple. All our healthy cells need glucose too, and there’s no way of telling our bodies to let healthy cells have the glucose they need, but not give it to cancer cells.

      And following severely restricted diets with very low amounts of carbohydrate could damage health in the long term by eliminating foods that are good sources of fibre and vitamins.

      This is particularly important for cancer patients, because some treatments can result in weight loss and put the body under a lot of stress. So poor nutrition from restrictive diets could also hamper recovery, or even be life-threatening.

      4 months ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      You are mixing metaphors so to speak LWC.

      I said thst eating sugar grew the cancer I had and not that it caused it. I had been eating exceptionally well prior and the tumor was VERY slow in growing. Natural sugars inside if whole food act quite differently inside a body than to processed sugars without any fiber.

      I believe the cancer I had was caused by oxygen starvation while breathing in poison that actually can cause certain cancers.

      There is a theory I just heard that cadmium in the atmosphere helps lung cancer along. In Britain they are taking a special type of protein to counter it. The belief is that it is one of the chemicals in those so slow to disperse trails some jets leave behind so that it certainly seems the trails are purposeful drops.

      Who knows?

      4 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I am not particularly a sweet-tooth, I like the buzz sugar gives me. "Refined" and "processed" are red-flags" for any food. If you read the labels you will be surprised at the number of foods packaged foods that contain "refined sugar" for example almost all breads and soups contain some sugar. Also remember that fructose and sucrose are "refined sugars" when you see them on a label.
      When I saw that I had low-blood sugar when I had cancer, I asked my oncologist why, he said that cancer stole the sugar from the normal cells.

      4 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Oh dear, geek. Please write to scienceblog about mixing metaphors. The quotes are theirs not mine. I mentioned I was copying and pasting quotes from the article, but you must have not seen that.

      Maybe you should also send them all of the arguments you spewed on us about their content. I am certain they will be awed by your brilliance.

      4 months ago
    • Lundmusik's Avatar
      Lundmusik

      I read a 2014 study — NIH —- that seemed to indicate that ethanol can slow melanoma tumor growth in mice. Ethanol has the opposite effect of glucose/sugar on blood sugar levels, so this kind of makes sense. Anyway, hurray for Vodka :-)

      4 months ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      LWC you have simply exemplified the meaning of "taken out of context" and shown how meaning can be sullied or changed by only using a snippet instead of a complete sentence, paragraph, or idea.

      Examples are:

      "My country right or wrong" which is actually a piece of "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right". The snippet has a different meaning and is incomplete to the whole idea.

      "Great minds think alike" instead of the complete thought which continues "Great minds think alike, but fools seldom differ"

      Or even the idea of drinking "8 glasses of water". The thought actually is immediately followed by "Most of this will be consumed in your day to day meals".

      Enjoy your day.

      4 months ago

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