• We have several hundred new members that have joined us over the last month. What #1 tips can you offer?

    Asked by GregP_WN on Monday, August 20, 2018

    We have several hundred new members that have joined us over the last month. What #1 tips can you offer?

    I like to call these "1 liner tips". So, what is your top 1 liner tip for someone just diagnosed with cancer?

    24 Answers from the Community

    24 answers
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      1. If possible, get treated at a major cancer research hospital or a satellite of one.

      2. Have hope. Remember that there are millions of cancer survivors.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Ohhhh, @Carool has some really good ones!!!

      Adding to hers ...

      3. Don't believe statistics. Live today.

      3 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      @LiveWithCancer, thank you! Yours is, too.

      3 months ago
    • Ilenealizah's Avatar
      Ilenealizah

      Advocate for yourself through education.
      For 24/7 support, join peer online groups.
      Trust your gut; you live in your body and you know it best.
      You must feel good communicating with your oncologist, if not change doctors.

      3 months ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      There is always hope!

      Be good to yourself and schedule some fun things between doctors appointments. Even if it’s spending a quiet evening at home with good supportive people.

      3 months ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      1. Do not panic.
      2. Do not give up.

      When I address cancer patients, I offer the following analogy: Picture yourself on a bridge over a river that winds it way to the sea. It is the most beautiful sunset that you have ever seen. The gorgeous reds, oranges and purples are reflected even in the river. No camera can capture the beauty. But, as you take it all in, you lose your balance and fall over the railing into the river! A complete shock and disorientation! You can't breathe and you can barely see. You are suddenly upside down, sinking in the river as it flows toward the ocean. Panic threatens!

      Question: Do you think to yourself, "Well, I guess this is it" and just sink to the bottom?

      NO!

      We are wired for survival. You struggle to get your bearings, start paddling your way to the surface and give thanks for that first gasp of life-giving air! Having done that, your next step is to get to the shore, where you have time to catch your breath and give thanks that your life has been spared. You are a soaked to the skin, nervous, shaking and dirty, but thankful to be alive.

      This is what the diagnosis can seem like. It is overwhelming and confusing. Yet, thinking about it, we struggle to the surface and then to the shore because we love and are loved. We are not ready to abandon that love. The same with a cancer diagnosis. After the initial shock, it will all begin to make sense.

      Life is still worth living - because of love.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Nice, @po18guy! Great analogy

      3 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      Always call the doctor's office if you have had side effects, even in the weekend.

      3 months ago
    • Nana52's Avatar
      Nana52

      Just remember, you have cancer but cancer does not have you! Be positive as much as possible. Get out and enjoy life. Don't stress over little things. Keep the negativity out of your life. This is a time when YOU are Number 1. And most of all, have fun, laugh and joke. Attitude is everything.

      3 months ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      If you are told you are stage 3 or 4 you are not necessarily going to fall over dead as the situation would lead you to believe. Many people live a very long time at stage 4.

      Also, attitude is everything. You have to stay as positive as you can to give yourself the mental strength to get through treatment. Positivity isn't always easy, but it has saved my life.

      3 months ago
    • merpreb's Avatar
      merpreb

      Have someone with you to take notes when you go to the doctor's or hospital.
      The statistics that you read about are not predictors of how you will do
      Don't listen to other's stories- yours is unique.
      If you aren't happy with your healthcare people then change. It's your health so don't worry about other's feelings.
      If you are able to get outside everyday and walk

      3 months ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      Last thing: get a good support network around you. My mom has cancer abd lives very remotely. She has meals on wheels in every day, a housekeeper twice a month, and a free ride service that takes her you all of her appointments.

      Plus she has me and the rest her family calling and checking and asking if she needs things. A good support system helps a lot!!!!

      3 months ago
    • myb's Avatar
      myb

      Ask your friends or family for a reference for doctors & hospitals in your cancer area. Find a doctor(s) that you can trust or as I put it back then, gave me a warm fuzzy. Your oncologist will be your doctor for your 5 years of monitoring, so really need trust here. Never accept nausea, as their are more meds than originally prescribed to you to manage it. My oncologist tweaked my chemo cocktail for 6 sessions to help me better manage symptoms. Write everything down when you are going through it and review with your oncologist between visits. I wrote what meds I took, how I felt, side effects, bowel movements, sleep, and exercise.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @merpreb is so right! Exercise is crucial to fight fatigue. It seems completely counter-intuitive, but the more you do, the more energy you will have.

      3 months ago
    • JustForToday's Avatar
      JustForToday

      This is big, real and can easily overwhelm a person. If that starts to happen: step back and think about just today and tomorrow. Take it one day at a time.

      3 months ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      Never underestimate the power of a second opinion. It could save your life.

      3 months ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Make sure you click with your doctor.
      Be nice to the oncology nurses -- it'll be easier for them to be nice to YOU.
      Cancer is not necessarily a death sentence -- there was only a 15% chance I'd be here typing these words, yet here I am...

      3 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      1) Order this Guidebook and Journal
      https://www.livestrong.org/what-we-do/program/livestrong-guidebook
      It is well worth the price
      2) Now is the time to adopt a healthy lifestyle my YMCA has several programs for cancer patients including one for patients during treatment. It also has some programs on nutrition. Get a referral to a dietition. Eating healthy is crucial to recovery.
      3) Stay social go to as many activities as you can Book Clubs, Political Action Groups, Card Playing Clubs, Quilting, Bird Watching, you get the drift.
      4) I second Jane A
      I am an 8 year survivor of stage IV cancer odds 4 in 100. After I got an agressive stage II uterine cancer 5 years ago the Dr. said that there was a 1 in 100 chance theat I would be cancer free today. Adopt a healthy lifestyle.

      3 months ago
    • merpreb's Avatar
      merpreb

      Boise- how much is the guide books?

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Digital version is free, @merpreb. Guidebook plus planner/journal is $31 if you order a hard copy.

      The digital guidebook is 178 pages. It appears that you can print it, if you wish.

      3 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      @merpreb I highly recommed the hard cover because it has pockets for documents and cards as well as different calendars. The digital version is only the guidebook. Although when I ordered the two volumn set it was about half price. I would still order it.

      3 months ago
    • LisaR's Avatar
      LisaR

      Stay away from these rainbows and unicorns type of promises to cure your cancer by reading Mr. I Cured My Cancer By Eating Beets' book. If those crackpot people had a plan that would work, and has been proven to work through research, then the doctors would be using it. And before the conspiracy theorist start quacking, save it. There is NO CURE for cancer that's being held by the government.

      The things I read and then see people that believe this crap just makes my blood boil.

      3 months ago
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Remember to engage your BS detector. As LisaR says above, there is no miracle cure held in secrecy by the government.

      ASK lots of questions of your doctors and medical team. Follow directions.

      Never give up!

      There's no shame in asking for help; asking for drugs (painkillers, sleep assistance, anti-depressants, etc.), company, help with every day tasks, rides, and so much more. ASK.

      We're here for you. This community is always supportive, informative and willing to direct you to your physician if we think you need immediate care or care beyond what you can get at home.

      Ignore the statistics on the Internet, most of them are old and new treatments/protocols are developed every day.

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Thank you, @LisaR!! Great advice.

      3 months ago

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