• What do you think about the ancestry background searches like 23andMe

    Asked by Julianna on Friday, January 18, 2019

    What do you think about the ancestry background searches like 23andMe

    I would like to know if they can find anything in my DNA that would make my daughter at risk. But now I see that this company has sold the information to GlaxoSmithKline.

    22 Answers from the Community

    22 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I haven't looked into the facts about this situation, but I did see that the drug company bought this company. I'm not sure, and doubt that it violates any HIPPA laws, but it does seem kind of shady.

      5 months ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      I went to Ancestry, not 23& me.
      Nothing medical there, just info about your ancestry and where your relatives came from. It also links you up with relatives who have also used their services.
      It was quite interesting.

      5 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      With 23andMe, they have two prices. One for the ancestry aspect and for another $100 bucks they supposed that they can give you medical information and the possibilities of certain illnesses. All from a sample of spit. I don't think that it is accurate in the information that you could be seeking. Will it tell your daughter she has a greater chance of cancer? Who knows! It's kind of modern day snake oil selling to thousands of people.
      My daughter did just the ancestry part and we all kind of knew what most of it would say. Irish, German and French. And a list of a few places we were unaware of.
      No one can really predict the future and to spend $200 bucks on this doesn't seem worth it to me.

      5 months ago
    • Terri's Avatar
      Terri

      I did it. My DNA is so out there after being in 4 clinical trials and being BRAC positive. I figure who cares. I found out that I am British and Irish. How sort of boring!

      5 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      If you want to know if your daughter is at risk, why not go through a doctor's office to ensure a reputable source? They would use your daughter's DNA.

      5 months ago
    • andreacha's Avatar
      andreacha

      I agree with BarbarainBham. Is your Oncologist also a Hematologist? Mine happens to be. I now get my blood work done every week. At least a CBC and a CMP. He tosses in a few others from time to time. It must be two years now, perhaps a little longer, there was something he didn't like as a result of one of the add-on tests. I gave another sample and it was sent off this time. He never said anything to me until his suspicion was satisfied. I was diagnosed with a hereditary disease called Hemachromotosis - a very serious liver disorder. As it turns out both my Mother and Father had it and never knew it. My Sister and Brother, both deceased now, had it also and never knew. I was the lucky one who had it manifest itself and because of my cancer, I can't have treatment for it. To this day I am scared as to what will happen to me with this disease even more than with my Cancer. If he hadn't followed his hunch he and I never would have known. It doesn't just have to be Cancer. Like me, it could be anything. I would speak to your Oncologist about your concerns. He may be able to help. Best to luck to both of you.

      5 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Andreacha, I had a friend who had hemachromotosis. She died from something else years ago, but her doctor's treatment was just to drain some of her blood every so often. Would that be bad for cancer? Maybe you could do that.

      If other members of your family had hemachromatosis and didn't know it, I hope you'll continue to do well with it, too.

      5 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      My cousin and my niece are very much into ancestry reasearch the old fashion way they go by records (birth, marriage and death certificates). My brother did a spit test. It came back with none of the nationalities that were on the records. Now I ask you how could couples going back several generations not not be pretty accurate? Most of these records were on the maternal line.
      I personally don't want to know about my ancestry. I acknowlege that I am responsible for the person I have become.
      @Terri my dermatologist said people of British and Irish ancestry are prone to skin cancer.

      5 months ago
    • Terri's Avatar
      Terri

      Boise, I have pure white fluorescent white skin. Ugh. I was born in CA too! A poster child for melanoma, i guess

      5 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      I agree with Clindra. My family agrees with Clindra.
      #1- I really studied this without taking classes, and I said here @ Whatnext that women don't have male DNA information. I gave sources. OK this summer, I watched a show where 2 half sisters were united- Great-- they have the same father-one in Oregon and the other in Viet Nam. So how does that make any sense?
      #2--Look at the Golden Gate Killer---a member of his family sent in DNA. So the cops send in his DNA and they find the family-but it was the wrong family. So the cops found a different family and they did find this horrifically sadistic man. Fine, but I don't want to deal with it, my family doesn't want to deal with that.
      #3--It's supposed to be illegal to sell personal information--Look at the problems that FaceBook is having. But the company sold their data to a drug company. This is so different from -Hey, BJ failed 5th grade again.
      #4- Whatever DNA says- it's the truth, whether it is or not. I have my truth. I've had my truth for 76 years. My truth doesn't hurt anybody else, so let it be.
      #5-Mother made our childhood positively horrible. Our only light was our father. He passed from cancer in 1954, I think. My mother was a ho, promiscuous, a tramp. Does anybody think that we want to find out that a creep is our biological father?

      Part of my history is that I'm Black Irish. I like that. I liked being in a gray-eyed family, where some were so white skinned and red-headed and others were black haired-some dark and some lily white-skinned. So why would I want to spend money for something that would say that I'm not Irish? I like my corned beef.

      5 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Oh, the Vietnamese sister had old photographs of their dad, when he was there. So it was true.

      5 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I have a friend who is adopted. She did both 23 and Me and Ancestry.com. She wanted to find her family. Well, she got test results back and started searching for family. She met a group of people who she thought were her sisters and brothers... But, then they had the DNA tests and their results didn't show she was related to them at all. I hope THEIR test results were the accurate ones. She ended up marrying one of the people who was supposed to be a brother.

      She didn't find relatives, but she found a husband.

      5 months ago
    • Gumpus61's Avatar
      Gumpus61

      Found my dad's Family back to 1655 In Ireland, 14th generation direct to a guy named pierce Noland who went to Virginia in 1677 or so. On Mom's side all the way back to Scotland, also 1655......and not one surprise in the whole thing. Now..........Genetic testing is on the way. Would you marry a woman you knew had the BRACA 1 or 2 gene ??

      5 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      @Grumpus61---If I were young and desperate, and you insisted that I be tested for breast cancer, I wouldn't marry you-no dating either. My father died from stomach cancer, a few weeks after he turned 40. Several of my mother's aunts died from the same cancer. I told my husband to be that I had a good chance of having cancer.

      My husband said, I love you and we'll deal with it if it happens.

      So I'd think that you'd dump me if a drunk driver hit me and I lost a leg or had a head injury-being less than perfect. and constant surgeries and medical bills- big bills. Other things happen too- life goes on. What if you had a child with cancer--would that be a source of fighting-would you walk off.

      I'm sure that you are a nice person, and the stress, fear, medications, etc caused you to come up with this what if.

      5 months ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Gumpus61 ---- Would you marry a man who was apt to have testicular cancer? Better cancer than some other problems: wife-beater, liar, druggie, thief. I would 100 times have a decent man with cancer than a healthy rat!

      I am with meyati.

      5 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Traditional marriage vows include the "in sickness and in health". If I loved a person who I knew had a likely chance of getting cancer I would research that cancer. I would insist on a healthy lifestyle. I would insist on screenings. I would also insist that we live frugally and save money.
      I lived almost my entire life knowing there was a good chance I would get cancer and it had nothing to do with my DNA. I was one of the lucky ones I didn't get cancer until I was older.

      5 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      What is the consensus here--that it's best not to know?

      Juliana, if I wanted accurate results, I'd go to an M.D. specializing in Genetics. Your daughter's doctor could refer her to one, or I know large medical schools have Genetics Departments.

      I've heard that knowing you carry the breast cancer gene can cause you to have problems with getting health insurance or even life insurance, because of the questions they ask when you sign up.

      You probably need to decide whether curiosity is a good enough reason to have a positive result hanging over your head your whole life. Since most breast cancer isn't genetic,, you could get breast cancer even if you are negative genetically.

      5 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      BoiseB, your brother may have used an inferior genetic company who is in error, or with all due respect somebody unknown could have fathered some children.

      I worked with a married woman who told me she had an affair with someone who fathered all three of her adult children, and none of them know it. Back in the olden days, people didn't get divorces because of economic reasons---women didn't usually work outside the home, so they depended on the husband for survival. That was a perfect situation for extramarital affairs.

      5 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Barbara, I think that one of my uncles is really my grandpa, and his parents raised my mother.. Then my grandparents would be my great grandparents. While interesting, I don't care to trace that girl's family tree.

      My grandmother was almost 60 when my mother came along. Then he always bought gifts for my mom, took her places, spent lots of time with her.

      5 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Barbara, it wouldn't have mattered who the father was the nationality would have been the same even if there had been extra-marital affairs because in the olden days people didn't move about much so if a woman had an extra-marital affair the lover would likely have the same nationality and her husband.
      I believe that my brother used 23 and me.

      5 months ago
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Boise---seaports and around military bases were different Boise-otherwise you are exactly right.

      5 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      I joined Ancestry.com ($20/month) for about six months for geneology, which I recommend if you want to learn more of the "story" of your family. Although the family tree had some geneologist's mistakes with similar names, you can write a comment requesting a correction. It's fascinating to browse thru the censuses, military records, marriage licenses, birth and death certificates back into the 1800's and 1700's, some showing handwriting of your ancestors. Seeing dates of things that happened can clarify along with info you've been told, sometimes sadly, like when you see military records of someone who died in the war, or old addresses on census records where my dad was a child. . . .

      Find-a-grave.com is another interesting way to explore. People used to have to travel on vacation to look at cemeteries. Now they just go to the computer for a picture of a tombstone with dates.

      I didn't do a DNA test with them because I think if you want accuracy, an M.D. geneticist should do it.

      5 months ago

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