• What do you think the punishment should be for someone who fakes having cancer just to scam people out of money?

    Asked by GregP_WN on Wednesday, February 20, 2019

    What do you think the punishment should be for someone who fakes having cancer just to scam people out of money?

    Kentucky woman faked cancer for four years, stealing over $10,000 along the way, prosecutor says
    https://www.newschannel5.com/news/national/kentucky-woman-faked-cancer-for-four-years-stealing-over-10-000-along-the-way-prosecutor-says

    14 Answers from the Community

    14 answers
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      Disgusting!!!

      3 months ago
    • Lynne-I-Am's Avatar
      Lynne-I-Am

      Punishment in prison is meaningless to this type of person. They only regret they were caught. I wish we could inject these people with a good dose of empathy . Apparently , for some , greed trumps humanity.

      3 months ago
    • banditwalker's Avatar
      banditwalker

      Punishment should be the same as if they stole that amount outright. And, having to pay everyone back. Of course we all know that latter part would not happen.

      3 months ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      This makes my blood boil. Between my son's accident and my cancer two months later, we were broke. Yet people can fake cancer and get money from the good intentions of others.
      Punishment should be hard on those who dupe other people. Just so wrong.

      3 months ago
    • SandiA's Avatar
      SandiA

      That’s awful!

      3 months ago
    • Terri's Avatar
      Terri

      I have seen this over and over. Meanwhile, people who actually could use the help get nothing. I actually met someone scamming the system at my Cancer Care Community. Mental illness or a huge entitlement complex. The lady I knew even stole DVD's from the facility. She stated she had problems too. I reported it but they didn't want to confront her.

      3 months ago
    • andreacha's Avatar
      andreacha

      I think she should be arrested. She stole from people for her own gain. Theft by deception is punishable by law.

      3 months ago
    • Skyemberr's Avatar
      Skyemberr

      I think that person should get to experience a nice round of stage 3c colon cancer. Not because it is the roughest, but because I personally know it sucks.

      3 months ago
    • Carool's Avatar
      Carool

      How about a year of prison for every thousand she conned out of sympathetic people? Ten years won't grow her a conscience, but at least she won't be enjoying life.

      3 months ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Karma will take care of it. However a stint in a medical cancer research lab as a lab rat might be a little quicker punishment, or should I say learning experience.

      3 months ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have always thought that since they wanted to be a cancer patient so bad that they should have to go through what we do. Sit them down and give them about 6 months of chemo followed by 60 radiation treatments and then tell them to call us if they still want to get some "support money".

      3 months ago
    • BugsBunny's Avatar
      BugsBunny

      I like the give 'em what they acted like they wanted idea. Sit them in that chair and let them watch the chemo slowly drip down the tube towards their arm and wonder what it's going to feel like when it hits their veins. What's it going to do to them? I bet they would cough up anything they ever took from anyone before it got to their arm.

      3 months ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      Unfortunately this is more common than we see. These people should be made an example of. Prison YES

      3 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      I think it would be called a fraudulent scam resulting in theft of $10,000, probably falling under the same statute as writing bad checks. The penalty should be reimbursing the $10,000, plus serving prison time including volunteer work with cancer patients.

      3 months ago

    Help the community by answering this question:

    Create an account to post your answer Already have an account? Sign in!

    By using WhatNext, you agree to our User Agreement, and Privacy Policy


    Read and answer more invasive, squamous cell carcinoma questions.  Also, don't forget to check out our Invasive, Squamous Cell Carcinoma page.