• What has cancer taken from you that you think is the most important thing that it sole from you?

    Asked by GregP_WN on Friday, September 6, 2019

    What has cancer taken from you that you think is the most important thing that it sole from you?

    For me it was my teeth until lately, now I would say my voice.

    17 Answers from the Community

    17 answers
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      My physical strength. And, because of all the joint, bone, muscle pain, my freedom to fully participate in aspects of my life I have always loved. Also my peace of mind.

      I was concerned about my vision, affected by the chemo, but last ophthalmologist visit it had actually improved, so, yay.

      about 2 years ago
    • BobbyZ's Avatar
      BobbyZ

      My confidence. I used to walk in a room and own it, now I walk in and feel self-conscious and I always think that people are looking at me thinking about how terrible I look.

      about 2 years ago
    • cllinda's Avatar
      cllinda

      It was my energy. I used to be unstoppable before cancer. Now, sometimes I have to say no to things that I used to love because I just don't have the energy I used to have.

      about 2 years ago
    • andreacha's Avatar
      andreacha

      For me, it was the ability to work and loss of savings.

      about 2 years ago
    • beachbum5817's Avatar
      beachbum5817

      I no longer can walk without pain in my feet. It doesn't stop me, but it sure makes it very uncomfortable, and I am on my feet at work for 6.5 hours a day. However, the most important thing that cancer stole from me is my husband. His journey did not have a happy ending.

      about 2 years ago
    • omaalyce's Avatar
      omaalyce

      Like others my physical strength and stamina. I use to go like the energy bunny and now I get tired so easily. I am going to the gym because I was having so much difficulty doing daily things, like bending down, putting on socks, getting out of a chair and other things we just take for granted. My husband says he can see a difference and that's great. Sometimes looking in the mirror is a shock, some days I look great and others I look so tired and old. It's a day by day process for sure.

      about 2 years ago
    • DanielD's Avatar
      DanielD

      It’s a tough call between
      1) Decreased physical strength from loss of stamina, fatigue. Limits my options no matter how much I force myself to do things.
      2) Poor cognition. Can’t read a book the way I used to. Connections between ideas don’t just happen. I’ll reread a paragraph multiple times knowing I’m missing things that are important. And short term memory fails me at the oddest and most inappropriate times.
      This is similar to what I imagine old age is.
      I'm learning to see life more as moment to moment rather than as a process – of which the present is just a component.

      about 2 years ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Daniel D, I can so commiserate with the cognition frustrstion. I remember trying to balance my checkbook and getting frustrated to the point of rage. It wasn't that I couldn't add or subtract the figures. I didn't know what or whether to add or subtract! I have improved brain function by doing puzzles (jigsaw, wordsearch, crosswords, I even found a kids' picture search book which is actually fun) and forcing my brain to focus. At first I could only concentrate for a couple of minutes but with time it has gotten so much better. It's like retraining your brain to do what you want it to do.

      about 2 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      Like others here, my loss of physical strength along with dealing with severe back pain. I can not even walk down to the mailbox without a supportive device. That means no more hikes in the woods, no more traveling to exotic places-- heck, it's a real pain just to go to a mall without my %^ walker. I used to be an athlete, now I am jealous of those who can just walk down the street!

      about 2 years ago
    • MichaelDicleLS's Avatar
      MichaelDicleLS

      It took our Mother, that's probably the most important thing in my life, but I don't think that's what you mean. So, for me, the most important thing I had that it has taken is my youth. I mean I have never felt my age, I have always been able to do things that someone my age shouldn't, I felt like I was always many years younger than my age. Well now that has reversed, I feel like I am 10 years older than my age.

      about 2 years ago
    • Dkatsmeow's Avatar
      Dkatsmeow

      My voice & my ability to eat. I cannot swallow. They cut a nerve in my face so that the left side of my throat is paralyzed. Also physical strength. I am not as strong as I once was. I have to ask my husband to lift things I used to be able to myself. And it takes twice as long to do anything anymore. And I am so forgetful. I can write it down & still forget.

      about 2 years ago
    • Paperpusher's Avatar
      Paperpusher

      For hubby, the fatigue and shortness of breath are the worst. He's had cognitive issues since his stroke in 2004 but the chemo has made that worse. He buys and sells on Ebay and has messed up orders. He has been playing a game on Facebook for years that's international. He has four pages just for that. He made so many mistakes there that he's all but quit. He said he's only doing daily maintenance. He's in the process of being tested to see what's what.

      about 2 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Dkatsmeow, I feel your pain. Thankfully I can still eat, but it's an event every time I try to get things down. I tell anyone around me to just ignore all the sounds they will hear coming out of me. Swallowing is tough and getting worse. We hope you improve!

      about 2 years ago
    • Russ' Avatar
      Russ

      For me the most important thing that cancer tries to take away is a challenge. If there is something I will defy with a passion anything and everything it tries to do. Bobby Z you say you used to walk in a room and own it. I too used to walk in a room and own it. I now make sure that when I walk in a room I make an effort to hold my head high. Too often those of us with cancer slouch over around other people who give out words of self pity. But you must defy any such feelings. Now I am realistic and know that there are times when you cannot physically do any of these things. My sister sent a placard to me some 8-10 years ago. The title is:

      “What Cancer Can't Do."

      • It can’t prevent Love
      • It can’t conquer the Spirit
      • It can’t silence Courage
      • It can’t take away Memories
      • It can’t weaken Faith
      • It can’t defeat Hope

      My best to all you...Russ

      about 2 years ago
    • cards7up's Avatar
      cards7up

      I have to agree with energy and strength. Not that I'm a body builder, but it took away most of my muscle strength. And I think being older, it's harder to get that back in any meaningful way. I'm a little slower but keep on keepin' on!!!

      about 2 years ago
    • Dkatsmeow's Avatar
      Dkatsmeow

      And I would like to add - My social life. I don't have one. I barely speak above a whisper & I have difficulty enunciating. so most people can't understand me. I was with my husband when he had his cataracts removed. I was sitting in the waiting room reading a book waiting. People would sit down in the area I was. But they didn't stay more than a minute or 2, before they would get up & move. Have you ever had that happen to you? It;s actually kind of rude.

      about 2 years ago
    • Paperpusher's Avatar
      Paperpusher

      Dkatsmeow..my husband tends to isolate himself in waiting rooms since he's a big guy. He's very sensitive about people staring at him but he's never had someone move away from him. That's terrible!

      about 2 years ago

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