• what is "interperiteneal chemo" ??? nobody talked about that option,,, just that "systemic chemo" wasn't very effective,,,

    Asked by maralyn on Friday, December 7, 2012

    what is "interperiteneal chemo" ??? nobody talked about that option,,, just that "systemic chemo" wasn't very effective,,,

    11 Answers from the Community

    11 answers
    • Harry's Avatar
      Harry

      Here is an article about the treatment of appendix cancer that describes interperiteneal chemo. http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/appendix-cancer/treatment

      about 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      IP chemo is still systemic, it is just a different method of administration. Most chemo regimens are infused directly into the bloodstream. IP chemo is infused into the abdominal cavity where it is then absorbed by the bloodstream. IP chemo is used for certain ovarian cancers that have metastasized through the abdominal wall or certain other primary cancers in the abdominal area. Side effects if IP chemo is considered to me more toxic than IV chemo and side effects can be more severe including kidney damage. It therefore requires a patient to be highly physically fit, especially with kidney function an other gastric system and even then it is not typically recommended as a primary treatment due to the associated risks and severity of side effects..

      about 4 years ago
    • abrub's Avatar
      abrub

      I had IntraPeritoneal (IP) chemo. For that, a belly port is place, that drains directly into the Peritoneal Cavity (not into a vein) Chemo is administered directly into the belly - they fill you with the chemo plus a carrier. Because it is not given through the blood stream, but directly onto the cancerous surfaces, they can give chemo that is 300 times as strong as in an IV (systemic) chemo, yet with much fewer side effects.

      It is used for Ovarian cancer and Appendix cancer (and other peritoneal cancers.) My treatments included going to the clinic 3 days in a row every other week. The first day, they infused 2 liters of chemo solution (and left it in.) Days 2 and 3, they infused 1 more liter each day. After each treatment, I spent an hour rolling from side to side (changing sides every 15 minutes) to disperse the chemo and bathe all the surfaces with the chemo.

      You need to have very little tumor in your belly, as the chemo can only penetrate a few millimeters. Many cancer centers do not do this. Memorial Sloan Kettering uses this technique in place of the HIPEC, heated chemo during surgery, that is becoming more common for Appendix Cancer. There is some question as to which is better, and which is more tolerable (IP is easier on the body than HIPEC.) For my tumor type, my surgeon has told me that IP chemo has a better outcome than HIPEC. So far, I'm living proof - full remission 5 years out.

      about 4 years ago
    • abrub's Avatar
      abrub

      PS - If you aren't seeing an Appendix Cancer specialist, then you need to have a consultation with one. Appendix cancer cannot be treated as "just another colon cancer" - it is quite different.

      about 4 years ago
    • maralyn's Avatar
      maralyn

      thank you everyone for your help!!! since my first surgery, HIPEC is all he talked about,,, it is on the same wave length, that being it is administered directly into the periteneal cavity... as of 6 weeks ago, all i have left inside is some stage 1 cells left, all the rest was removed at that time.

      about 4 years ago
    • fastdog's Avatar
      fastdog

      I had HIPEC June 11, 2011 at U-Mass Medical Center in Worcester, MA, for cancer of the appendix. Although I've seen it referred to as "the mother of all surgeries," I had a good, uneventful recovery and no side effects. And I'm 67 years old, was in good, but not great, physical condition before surgery. I've since read that you need to train as if for a marathon to get ready for the surgery, but I didn't know that then and did just fine. It was a 12-hour surgery, and my biggest complaint post-surgery was neck and back pain from being laid out on my back for so long, as I have scoliosis. You might find the PMP Pals website helpful, as well as this What Next. They have literature helping you know what you might expect. I would only stress that everyone's experience is different.

      about 4 years ago
    • fastdog's Avatar
      fastdog

      Oops, it was June 11, 2012.

      about 4 years ago
    • Crash's Avatar
      Crash

      Probably "intraperitoneal chemo" Instead of having chemo put into your bloodstream where it goes to every part of your body, chemo can be delivered into your abdominal cavity where it sloshes around your liver, stomach, lymph nodes and whatever else is in there. Think of it as a "belly wash" for cancer.

      about 4 years ago
    • abrub's Avatar
      abrub

      Crash is exactly right. Very little of the IP chemo gets into your bloodstream. However, your innards are bathed in the solution of chemo, which is left to slosh around. (You don't feel the sloshing). With Heated IP Chemo (HIPEC), the chemo is run through your belly for a defined amount of time, and then drained out (all while you are under anesthesia.)

      about 4 years ago
    • maralyn's Avatar
      maralyn

      thanks for the input!!! i have a site that explains the before, during, and after stages of HIPEC,,, getting stronger is definately a must for me,,, my body struggled to get through the first surgery, and i want to go into this one much healthier,,, you all are so encouraging for this, it really does help!!!

      about 4 years ago
    • maralyn's Avatar
      maralyn

      i live in iowa, and there is a surgeon in des moines who does this HIPEC, so i feel i am in the best hands around!!! he is from germany, but he trained and practiced out east!!! oh am i grateful he chose to come to midwest iowa!!!

      about 4 years ago

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