• what is numb feet and tingleing,,,any thing to releive it out there,,,thanks...done w/chemo..doing raidation now...

    Asked by mtolady on Wednesday, October 3, 2012

    what is numb feet and tingleing,,,any thing to releive it out there,,,thanks...done w/chemo..doing raidation now...

    25 Answers from the Community

    25 answers
    • FreeBird's Avatar
      FreeBird

      Hello. Probably this is what's called chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, CIPN, which is common. My father is also experiencing this. Many people here on Whatnext.com experience this with their chemo. We have never found anything that works for dad. Some people on here will chime in with what works for them. If not, I will go check what they said worked for them. http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/PhysicalSideEffects/ChemotherapyEffects/PeripheralNeuropathy/index

      If it gets to the point where it becomes painful, or interferes with mobility for my dad, I'm going to ask the doctor about the possibility of using the drug Cymbalta http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/results/summary/2012/neuropathy0612

      about 5 years ago
    • FreeBird's Avatar
      FreeBird

      Here are some of those other previous answers:

      https://www.whatnext.com/questions/neuropathy

      https://www.whatnext.com/questions/what-helped-you-with-chemo-induced-peripheral-neuropathy-cipn-and-how-long-did-yours-last

      For more, enter "neuropathy" into the box on the questions page that says, "Cancer Questions, Enter a search term"

      about 5 years ago
    • lynn1950's Avatar
      lynn1950

      I had numb feet and tingling following treatment; it was mild and went away on its own. I did let my oncologist know about it.

      about 5 years ago
    • hjtobar's Avatar
      hjtobar

      The tingling may be caused by temperature changes. Do you experience the tingling sensation when you pick up a cold glass of water, or your feet get a bit cold while lounging around? My mom experiences this and it is temperature relative for her. She doesn't drink/eat anything that is cold or very hot, and does not prepare these foods for herself. Hope this helps! :)

      about 5 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      I have CIPN. My last chemo treatment was in late March. It has gotten a little better since then, but I still have numbness in my feet and hands. It gives me some balance problems so I have to be careful when I walk and I have to pretty much hold things with both hands and really pay attention or I will drop them.

      about 5 years ago
    • Harry's Avatar
      Harry

      As I understand it, and I am not an expert, the cause of peripheral neuropathy is damage to the myelin sheath around nerve cells. It's a bit like damaged insulation allowing electical lines to short circuit. Although the cause is different, this is similar to what happens to sufferers of MS. The bad news is that they don't know how to fix this problem. The good news is that they are working on it.

      If you haven't already, tell your oncologist that you are having this problem.

      about 5 years ago
    • debco148's Avatar
      debco148

      It appears you may have had Taxol as one of the chemos. I too had this right after my first dose of Taxol. Please talk to your oncologist about this, they can prescribe something to help with symptoms. But, this is generally called neuropathy, it can be permanent or can subside. As with all things in this journey we are all different. My onc told me to take 200 mgs of vitamin B6 every day. This does help. I was also taking another a prescribed drug, but chose to stop it because it made me more foggy. Enough of that! I also heard from my support group that accupuncture is working very well for this. I have been doing Reiki and find that helps a lot as well. Best of luck!

      about 5 years ago
    • attypatty's Avatar
      attypatty

      Dear mtolady:
      Did you have Taxol as part of your chemotherapy? If so, it's the likely cause.My feet were tingling and I had numbness in the third and fourth toes and the balls of both feet. It is peripheral neuropathy and can vary from stage one - present but not interfering with daily activities - to stage four - debilitating. The damage to the nerves and the feeling that it causes may resolve itself, but, as my onc so kindly put it, "It may takes weeks, or months, or years, or never." I have tried extra Vitamin B6 and B12, message, exercise, glutamine - nothing really made a difference. It's been 6 months since I have had my last Taxol treatment and the neuropathy is subsiding somewhat, but still noticeably present all the time. The one thing that helped a lot, at least for a little while, was hydrotherapy. I was relaxing in the hotel jacuzzi last weekend and I put the bottoms of my feet right up against the jets. It took all the tingling, numbness and pain away and the absence of pain lasted for several hours. Maybe our oncs can prescribe a hot tub so we can do this every day!
      Fight On,
      Attypatty

      about 5 years ago
    • sewfun928's Avatar
      sewfun928

      I finished Chemo in June and I still have the numbness and tingleing in my hands and feet. My doctor siad it could take a while for it to go away or that it might never go away. My biggest problem is I tend to burn my hands when taking things out of the oven. I can't feel the burn until its too late. It took me a few weeks to be able to wear closed toe shoes, but I am able to do that. I am happy to be alive so I will just roll with the changes. Good luck.

      about 5 years ago
    • princess123's Avatar
      princess123

      My doctor prescribed Gabapentin for this. It's called neuropothy. It will also go away now that you've stopped chemo. I asked my doctor about it my last visit and she confirmed this.

      about 5 years ago
    • JudyW's Avatar
      JudyW

      My guess is it is, as FreeBird suggested, chemo-induced neuropathy. I take a heavy-duty B complex tablet daily (upon the recommendation of my oncologist) to try to restore the feeling to my toes and my fingers. That said, I still have days where I have the neuropathy pretty significantly, and I finished chemo in January of 2011. The B Complex (I think it's called B-100) has helped significantly for me, I believe, though the oncologist has told me it may never return completely.

      about 5 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      You definitely have neuropathy. GABAPENTIN!!!! I saw that someone else mentioned this MIRACLE DRUG as well. Both of my feet are numb from Cisplatin. I take 900 mg of gabapentin per day. Once the medicine kicks in, I don't notice much of the numbness or tingling. You can take up to 3600 mg so you really have to play with it to find the dose that works for you. But at 3600 mg, you would probably be a zombie. I think they start you out at 100 mg. Also, a lot of folks have had success with alpha lipoic acid. This is an over the counter supplement. Speak with your Oncologist about how much of this can be taken. It can be taken in addition to the gabapentin.

      about 5 years ago
    • myb's Avatar
      myb

      I finished chemo on 9/13 and constant tingling in my hands and feet started on 9/18. I started taking alpha lipoic acid (ALA) for peripheral neuropathy after chemo 4 and seemed to help hand cramping but not the reaction to touching cold objects. I am still taking ALA to help with this constant tingling, but to no avail yet. My Onc mentioned taking Gabepentin (Neurontin) 300 mg daily at bedtime, but I can't commit to taking an anti-depressant to help with neuropathy. The list of side effects brings me right back to where I was at on chemo for taking a pill to reduce the side effects of chemo for nausea, constipation, anxiety ...

      I wonder if this constant tingling will lead to long term effects in my hands and feet?

      I had 12 chemo treatments for colon cancer of folfox and oxaliplatin, but stopped oxaliplatin at chemo 11 due to a reaction where my face, ears and hands were red.

      about 5 years ago
    • eweneek's Avatar
      eweneek

      I experienced neuropathy during the Taxol phase of chemotherapy. It was difficult to hang on to objects and it felt as though I had paper cuts on the tips of all my fingers when I used a keyboard. My care team recommended I try a rebuilder. It consists of socks and gloves that I dampen with water and then connect them to a device that send electric currents through the fabric causing electrostimulation of the nerves. I experienced immediate relief that lasted for most of the day. I was also taking B complex. I tried accupuncture which did help but I prefer the rebuilder. The absolute best for symptoms in my feet was manual therapy with a skilled reflexologist. I finished chemo about 8 months ago. I still occasionally notice some neuropathy, but it is very mild.

      about 5 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      Gabapentin is not an anti-depressant. It's prescribed as a medicine to prevent seizures associated with epilepsy. It just so happens that it treats neuropathy as well. Sometimes the side effects are worth the risk especially considering the amount of relief associated with the medicine. I haven't experienced one of the listed side effects for this medicine and have been taking it for quite a few months now. It's worth speaking to your Dr about.

      about 5 years ago
    • mtolady's Avatar
      mtolady

      Thank you all for your advise..I will tell my Dr....Will keep you posted

      about 5 years ago
    • DaveWaz's Avatar
      DaveWaz

      WhatNexters,

      Conversation around this topic inspired a blog article on our site that you may find helpful.

      Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy - What, Why, and How
      http://www.whatnext.com/blog/posts/chemotherapy-induced-peripheral-neuropathy-what-why-and-how

      This article might help you and others gain insights on what is happening; it also points to related questions about neuropathy on the site.

      David

      about 4 years ago
    • alivenwell's Avatar
      alivenwell

      I have been doing vitamin B6 for at least 6 months and it does seem to help. Has anybody ever tried using cayenne pepper combined with hand cream? I was told to be extremely careful to not get cayenne pepper in my eyes. Wearing gloves is advisable before applying the mixture to feet and removing gloves after covering the feet with the mixture. I am not sure how to wash it out other than taking gloves off inside out.

      almost 4 years ago
    • attypatty's Avatar
      attypatty

      I have a new answer to this question - I think I found something that can be done! Recently, I have resumed chiropractic care after 2 years going without (it was enough just to endure the cancer treatment - I know everyone here gets that). I told my chiropractor about the neuropathy in my feet and hands. After two weeks of general treatment, and two treatments of adjustments to my feet, my feet feel better - the numbness is less and the tingling is gone. Still not 100% back to normal but I have hope that it will get there.
      Fight On,
      Attypatty

      almost 4 years ago
    • lawcreate's Avatar
      lawcreate

      After reading all the answers, I am going to add my 2 cents. There is no cure for CIPN - they don't really know what mechanism it is that causes it, but my husband (a pharmacokineticist) says they are working on it. The drugs some ppl mention are not for everyone, but if it helps, all the more power to you. I have always thought that your body (and mind) should be at its possible best and strongest before going into any cancer treatment. Your body will be assaulted with things such as surgery, radiation or chemo - a tough road for anyone. As well, I am a big proponent of supplements before, during and after treatment, once they are approved by your Dr's. I did not do my Glutamine (as I should have) with my big chemo and I paid the price with CIPN. What I did do, was supplements at the end of my cycles and a very good detox afterwards. I had results within 24 hrs from the detox. The sooner you can clear the chemicals from your body and allow the repair process of your nerves to begin, the better it will be. Six months out from my last chemo, I do my detox about every 2-3 days and it seems to be working well. I hope someone else has had luck with this path.

      over 3 years ago
    • Donna1943's Avatar
      Donna1943

      I still have Neuropathy - 18 months post chemo treatment. My hands are much better. My feet improved but still there. I did take 3 acupuncture treatments. I hope to try more.

      over 3 years ago
    • RIVERDALE's Avatar
      RIVERDALE

      I am 6 months post chemo and my hands are much better just the tips of my fingers are numb...I had no extra treatment advised ..I did get very scared when the numbness in my feet and legs started to get worse and rose as high as mid thigh where at first it was well below the knees..I went to my oncologist and he offered a referral to a neurologist but that takes months here in Canada so I went to a Chinese medicine doctor and she used a form of acupuncture that consisted of glass bottles that applied suction to areas....it was very painful at first but seemed to work some what as the pain got less with the next treatment and the numbness crept back down my legs till it is just in the feet

      about 3 years ago
    • irenesf's Avatar
      irenesf

      Reflexology helped my feet fell somewhat better, less cramping, less tingling.

      over 2 years ago
    • advice4me's Avatar
      advice4me

      I have read through the entire thread and haven't seen what has relieved my neuropathy symptoms: Ultrasound.

      I was given a treatment by physical therapist who experienced neuropathy herself. At the time, I had not been able to feel much of my feet for 7 months, but after her treatment, I could feel my toes for the 1st time. I got my oncologist to refer me to a PT to continue the treatments every 2 weeks.

      That PT suggested I buy a portable machine, recommending LGMedSupply.com. I bought the LG "Pro Series" Ultrasound. (Don't get the Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) unit - although based on @eweneek's electrostimulation through socks & gloves, this might work too. I would certainly advise getting professional advice before trying this or, for that matter, my Ultrasound therapy.)

      So I now do treatments to my feet 2 x week. I spread the ultrasound gel over the top of my feet near the toes, and on the head of the handheld unit. What works for me is an intensity setting of 3 and duration of 10 minutes. I would experiment with lower settings starting out. Please note: There is no physical sensation except occasionaly a slight vibration if the head isn't in complete contact with your foot. If the machine isn't in contact with a surface, it will automatically turn off within a few seconds. I treat myself to a hot washrag to clean up the gel at the end.

      My neuropathy got much better for months, but it has leveled out some, so I am going to see a neurologist for additional alternatives. My feet are still sore when I walk and I have difficulty going any distances. I have had neuropathy for 17 months now. My goal is to be able walk the distances needed to travel, so I'm not giving up yet on additional improvement.

      Also, in case this helps: UCSF Medical is also running an double blind study on photon stimulation that has been successful for diabetes induced peripheral neuropathy.

      over 2 years ago
    • lawcreate's Avatar
      lawcreate

      advice4me - Neat idea. I've not heard of it, but will file that one away. Glad it worked well for you! And thanks for adding to this thread. The more options for ppl, all the better. Good Luck!

      over 2 years ago

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