• What is the incidence of developing an umbilical hernia after DaVinci prostatectomy?

    Asked by James on Sunday, April 15, 2012

    What is the incidence of developing an umbilical hernia after DaVinci prostatectomy?

    Davinci surgery in 10/09...small hernia developed at navel about mid '10. Now my sense of my surgeon's capability is confounded by the fact that if he couldn't repair a simple incision how good could he have been doing the much more precise surgery on the actual prostate removal. He claims the nerve bundle was spared but I still suffer from ED.

    7 Answers from the Community

    7 answers
    • Indyeastside's Avatar
      Indyeastside

      James, I'd like to know too. I developed a hernia while working out after surgery. No one seems very excited about it. My oncology folks said just push it back in once and a while.

      Apart from ac occasional pinch and protrusion-I'm living with it for now. But no doubt it was a result of the surgery site tearing after the exercise. Lets see how many else folks have the same experience. Thanks for your question.

      about 5 years ago
    • James' Avatar
      James

      Indyeastside: These "experts" are so cavalier after they treat you. When I pointed out to him that this hernia was developing his comment was:" Oh, we let our general surgeon take care of that". My dermatologist claims he sees these umbilical hernias in several of his patients who have had robotic prostatectomies. My idea is that they're so happy to be thru the tough part that they rush the last step (or their assistants rush the navel closure) and they run to their "tee times". Let's see what others have experienced...thanks for your input.

      about 5 years ago
    • fusilier's Avatar
      fusilier

      There's a connective tissue seam - called the linea alba - that runs vertically right through the umbilicus. That's where the incision is made. (Mine, too!)

      Under the best of circumstances it's a weak area. Connective tissue just doesn't heal well, since there aren't that many cells around, only stuff those cells make. Think how difficult it is to get a knee repaired, like an ACL tear.

      I'm only 5 1/2 months post surgery, but it is really annoying to limit my lifting and such.

      WRT the erectile dysfunction - I'm not back yet. However, I have full sensitivity on the glans of the XXX - and I'm about 98% on bladder control.

      fusilier
      James 2:24

      about 5 years ago
    • fusilier's Avatar
      fusilier

      errr. Why did an autocensor "x" out the proper anatomical term for the human intromittant organ?

      fusilier
      James 2:24

      about 5 years ago
    • James' Avatar
      James

      Fusillier, His Mommy probably didn't let him hang out on street corners. But funny you should compare hernia repair with knee surgery...received a replacement in 2/11 and procedure went well and even spared the ACL. If these post op tears are so difficult to mend why haven't they begun to use a "mesh" as in other herniated injuries? Am I then not being fair in thinking that the surgeon or his assistants didn't do the best possible closure?

      about 5 years ago
    • fusilier's Avatar
      fusilier

      James --- ;^) ;^)

      I am not an MD, I don't practice medicine, and I don't pay malpractice insurance, so take what I have to say with that caveat.

      I can't answer your question as to what the best practice is. All I know is that structure is a weak region, under tension from four layers of muscle pulling in four different directions.

      I do know that the various mesh reinforcements don't have a sterling track record in surgeries in other body regions. Cells don't want to use most synthetics as a scaffold for growth.

      fusilier
      James 2:24

      about 5 years ago
    • James' Avatar
      James

      Fusillier, Appreciate your input. I spent much time watching this robotic procedure on UTube prior to my decision to have it. I attended and became part of a prostate support group also prior to my surgery. I was given a DVD made by this surgeon to "sell" the procedure and, of course, his capability in performing with this technology. No where was it indicated the possibility of a hernia developing including in the release form I signed pre op.
      The Davinci procedure has become so popular because it is promoted to be nerve sparing which, as you realize, is not a guarantee. These machines are certainly advances over the previous methods but how many urologists are really adept at using them. I guess I'm just annoyed that as much I thought that I was reviewing my options all the information was not forthcoming.

      about 5 years ago

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