• What is the longest someone has lived with Stage 4 prostate cancer?

    Asked by c1a1c1 on Friday, July 20, 2018

    What is the longest someone has lived with Stage 4 prostate cancer?

    14 Answers from the Community

    14 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      That's going to be hard to say, as far as the "record" longest living person with Prostate Cancer. But we have several prostate cancer survivors here, I'm sure they will add their own history and how many years. My Dad had prostate cancer and lived with it for about 20 years.

      3 months ago
    • c1a1c1's Avatar
      c1a1c1

      At what point did it turn into Stage 4 with metastasis into bones which is where my husband is now. And how long did he live after that?

      3 months ago
    • barryboomer's Avatar
      barryboomer

      You can live a very long time.....

      3 months ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      I want to tell you that you cannot - cannot - compare your husband's life expectancy to anyone else's. No matter if there was no one who lived a year with a diagnosis of stage 4 prostate cancer (which is far-fetched because I know a lot of people who lived more than a year with late-stage prostate cancer), it has nothing to do with your husband.

      When I was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer, my doctor said, "four months." Statistics say less than 5% of those diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer will be alive after 5 years. But, I know a lot of people who have been living with stage IV lung cancer for more than five years. (I know some who passed away, too. The point is, no one knows. And just because I have lived with stage IV lung cancer for nearly 6 years doesn't mean the next person diagnosed will. Just because my friend is nearly 10 years out after diagnosis doesn't mean I will make that.) Survival is individual.

      Please don't scare yourself by looking at stats.

      My unsolicited suggestion is to live today. Enjoy life. Take care of business in the event one of you passes away (we all will), but don't dwell on it or let it control you or your life. Stay active. Get those bucket list items checked off. Make memories. And, who knows? You might look up and realize that years have passed right by while you were both enjoying life together.

      3 months ago
    • macfightsback's Avatar
      macfightsback

      I have a friend in our Cancer meditation group who has stage 4 prostate cancer. He initially was told he was "terminal" but recently he was told he was cancer free. So everyone is individual in their cancer journey. You never know what is going to happen. You can Google statistics for outcomes and that will give you a statistical number which is already outdated because it is history from that many years back. (Often 5 years for example.). Maybe you will be the longest lived person. I must add it is for me not how long I live but the quality of my life. I would rather live 10 years where I am in no pain, able to live Independently, help others, challenge myself by trying new things than live 30 years in Nursing home having others care for me.

      3 months ago
    • carm's Avatar
      carm

      You might be interested in knowing that the latest information demonstrates that 91.5% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer live to a normal life expectancy and those with an advanced cancer live approximately 13 years so someone diagnosed in 2017 are most likely to benefit from future technology invented by 2030...it is known to be one of the slowest growing cancers...even when aggressive. I hope this puts things in perspective. Best of luck to you.

      3 months ago
    • AuburnAngel's Avatar
      AuburnAngel

      Here's a different perspective. First of all non of us have expiration dates stamped on us and any of us could be hit by a bus crossing the street tomorrow.

      We had a doc tell us that if nothing worked, all the treatments available to us to try...then he may have 2 - 10 years. We know at least some of what we're doing is working. We've also had a doc mark the curative box on the form for a current aggressive protocol.

      So I think it's... do our best to learn everything we can about what we're up against. Work on the, what's best for us plan and plan on living each moment as fully as possible.

      3 months ago
    • c1a1c1's Avatar
      c1a1c1

      Auburn - sure glad you get that feedback from your dr. Ours won't even give us a clue as to life expectancy.

      3 months ago
    • AuburnAngel's Avatar
      AuburnAngel

      In the big scheme of things, I don't think it is something can honestly answer with much certainty because each person is so very different.

      3 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      c1a1c1, ask your doctor for a range of how long he might live. Tell him why you want to know, since there's no way to know anyway, and maybe he'll tell you something helpful.

      Go ahead and enjoy your life and do things with your family. Make memories and photos of the memories for later. Best wishes.

      3 months ago
    • lindi143's Avatar
      lindi143

      I am of the train of thought that no one knows the statistics are all very narrow and as our Dr told us yesterday there are so many new things coming out. We have had 2 kinda new therapies this year and as he said there are more on the horizon. He Told us that if thsi was 10 years ago my husband would not be here long but now there is no limit My husbands is very aggressive and they are hitting ti hard He will always need some type treatment but that they expect new treatments soooo we are choosing to look at it as yes it will need treatment but probably something else will get us. IT is very stressful but I dont want times assigned to it. it is a good time in the development of new treatments. It is very scary and i do not know if he will be here next year but we are hoping. I know i kinda rambled but i hope maybe this will help you a bit. i agree the not knowing is soooo exhausting and the on goign treatmetn and cant get away from it has changed our whole life but this is what we got. Best wishes freind.

      3 months ago
    • c1a1c1's Avatar
      c1a1c1

      All i expect from the oncologist is an answer about what his experience has been with other patients - a range of years based on the availability of treatment now. We're not holding him to it.

      3 months ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Tell the doctor what you want, possibly in a letter or without your husband with you. There are official statistics available online if you know what his path report says, but they aren't really predictions for your husband.

      I suspect his doctor doesn't want to cause the patient any undue stress or change in behavior. Since length of life is very dependent on a patient's attitude and hope, no doctor can be faulted for wanting the best for his patient. Stress affects cancer.

      Sometimes here we say you need to prepare for the worst (wills, estate planning, etc.) and then RELAX and hope for the best---happy times and making memories--- for as long as he's able.

      It might be helpful to talk to a counselor about your feelings about this. Even if your doctor gave you a "range," there are some things that no one knows.

      3 months ago
    • Anotherday's Avatar
      Anotherday (Best Answer!)

      I have had a lot of doctors helping me. None of them would give me an answer to your question. Best answer I received was you will probably die from something else / not the prostate cancer. I was diagnosed Dec 2014 with a psa of 4200.initial treatment was radiation 30 days with firmagon then onto lupron with bicalutimide psa went to .01 next up was exgeva which will be forever psa began to rise after 6 months got to 32 and 2 oncologists agreed to go with arbiritarone it knocked psa back to .01 / psa back on the move after 3 years it is now at 12. Bone scan scheduled for next Thursday to see where we go from here/ probably to enzalutimde. Point being everyday a gift and I have been fortunate that I have been pain free. Every journey different God bless

      about 1 month ago

    Help the community by answering this question:

    Create an account to post your answer Already have an account? Sign in!

    By using WhatNext, you agree to our User Agreement, and Privacy Policy


    Read and answer more prostate cancer questions.  Also, don't forget to check out our Prostate Cancer page.