• What's the outcome from "mixed results" from chemo?

    Asked by TDog on Friday, November 30, 2012

    What's the outcome from "mixed results" from chemo?

    I have a MPNST metastasized to the lungs. The two biggest nodules shrank quite a bit, but the smaller ones grew about 1 cm. The oncologist doesn't think it's anything to worry about because, frankly, I'm feeling better & more energetic that even before my diagnosis. But I was curious if anyone else has had this and what kind of outcomes can happen? Thanks.

    9 Answers from the Community

    9 answers
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      I would get a second opinion. Not sure why a Dr would want to ignore a tumor that's increasing in size. Then again, I'm not a Dr. 1 cm is a pretty good size for a tumor. Not something I would want to ignore.

      over 4 years ago
    • TDog's Avatar
      TDog

      Not ignore, but he said there can be measurement errors from CAT scans and they treat patients, not the CT scan. I am going in for a different protocol in the New Year, so it's not like he's ignoring it, but he is saying it's not a reason to despair.

      over 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      I agree with ticklingcancer - get a 2nd opinion, or at least ask your oncologist to what "ignore" means -I read all my scan reports, and sometimes they say "continue watching/monitoring"

      In July I received a "mixed results" report - the plus - all my markers (including the one for Breast Cancer) had gone down and were normal, my Renal Cell cancer remained stable, the nodes in my lungs were gone. The negative - the Breast cancer lesion had grown a bit - from 1.7 1.9 cm. My oncologist changed my breast cancer meds, but kept the avastan which is being used to treat both cancers. My next two scans showed that all lesions were shrinking.

      over 4 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      I'm sorry, ignore was probably the wrong word to use. I would still go for a 2nd opinion. Never hurts to be absolutely sure.

      over 4 years ago
    • Peroll's Avatar
      Peroll (Best Answer!)

      TDog, you are correct that there are measurment accuracy issues with CT scans. It is also unusual that the bigest tumors would shrink but the smaller ones grew, usually it would be the other way around. One important thing to know is which if any tumors have been biopsied as it is alway possible that the others are not cancer but someting else. A 1 cm growth is large enouth to be pretty sure that it is growing; however, if you meant 1 mm then that is well with in the measurememnt accuracy and there would be no way to tell if it has grown and it could have even shrunk.

      I have had cancer matasticize to the lungs (colon cancer in my case) in tow places after about 9 months of chemo that maintained the size of the tumors I went looking for something more definitive. I looked a a number of options and decided to have the tumors surgically removed (this may not be possible in all cases). There are other options too like radiation, cyberknife and radio frequency ablation that can kill the cancer. I always think it is a good idea to discuss all of the options with your Doctors and get second opinions from speciaists in each of the treatments. You may find something that works for your case.

      over 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      I'm not sure what you are asking. The outcome is what you stated. Two tumors got considerably smaller and smaller ones got slightly larger after chemo. So that is the outcome. Are you asking about future treatment? Prognosis?

      over 4 years ago
    • TDog's Avatar
      TDog

      Prognosis kind of thing: what % go to further shrinkage and what % just gets worse kind of spread. From what I gather so far, it's not a good thing but it's not a lose hope kind of thing either.

      over 4 years ago
    • Harry's Avatar
      Harry

      There's probably no way for us to know your prognosis. As you say, the results are a mixed bag. You can get a second opinion. That's probably a good idea . But, frankly, at this point, if it were me, I would go with the oncologist's evaluation and listen to my body--which sounds pretty happy right now. :-)

      I would ask the oncologist how he plans to monitor those nodules and what he will be looking for to tell him that they are a problem.

      over 4 years ago
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      The unfortunate thing about chemo is that you can't compare how you would have fared without chemo. You smaller tumors may have grown slightly, with chemo, but they might have grown a lot without chemo. Different tumors can respond differently to different chemo drugs. So your oncologist sounds like he be planning a different chemo for the growing tumors.

      over 4 years ago

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