• LMM's Avatar

    When you were first told you had cancer, and left waiting for test results and meeting with oncologist did every little ache and pain make

    Asked by LMM on Tuesday, January 8, 2013

    When you were first told you had cancer, and left waiting for test results and meeting with oncologist did every little ache and pain make

    You think it was the cancer spreading through your body? Or am I driving myself nuts?

    21 Answers from the Community

    21 answers
    • nancyjac's Avatar
      nancyjac

      Nope, I never had any aches or pains until I started treatment for cancer.

      about 4 years ago
    • LMM's Avatar
      LMM

      Prior to this I felt very healthy, perhaps I am driving myself crazy.

      about 4 years ago
    • Harry's Avatar
      Harry

      I think your feelings are entirely normal, but yes, you are probably driving yourself nuts. :-)

      Seriously, this sort of thing is common, but you probably should try not to worry for a couple of reasons. One is that the cancer has been caught and a treatment program will start soon. This isn't like it was spreading without anyone knowing it. That's what is deadly. The other reason is that tumors, by themselves, don't tend to cause pain. they might cause pain if they press against a nerve or, as I experienced a month ago, against a jaw or other joint. But, in most circumstances there is little pain. So, aches and pains you might feel now are no different than those you felt before you were told about the cancer.

      In my case, I have had two bouts. The first was two years ago. My cancer is a blood cancer and I felt no pains except that, after treatment, I realized that I no longer suffered from nocturnal leg cramps. My biggest symptom prior to diagnosis was nose bleeding. After the nose bleeds were stopped, I saw my family doctor. He found odd blood test results and sent me to a specialist. I guessed the outcome when I read "Hematologist/Oncologist" on the specialist's door. The specialist took more blood tests and then told me about the cancer. He mentioned, in passing, that it was the cancer that caused the nose bleeds. After he told me that I had cancer he still had to confirm it with a bone marrow biopsy.

      The second time was last month. I had a tooth ache and jaw swelling. Antibiotics stopped the pain for awhile, but the swelling wouldn't go away. Eventually, an oral surgeon took a sample "to rule out something wierd." When his office called me to get me in to see him immediately and not wait until my scheduled visit the next day I guessed the result. As soon as I heard "lymphoma" I was calling the hematologist/oncologist. In this case, the pain from the tumor pressing against my jaw was considerable, and not at all like the toothache. There was no doubt.

      about 4 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      In this is normal. Well, i did it anyway and wiuld like to think im in the norm....lol. I still sometimes think that a pain is related to my cancer and then my oncologist tells me I'm ok!!

      about 4 years ago
    • ticklingcancer's Avatar
      ticklingcancer

      That should say "I think this is normal" stupid phone!!

      about 4 years ago
    • nobrand's Avatar
      nobrand

      I had a lot of bizarre pain leading up to my diagnosis, and I think once they found the tumor it was like a relief to finally have an answer. Recurring/bizarre pains should be investigated.. but it's possible to have an achy lower back and it not be related to the cancer at all. I just try to keep myself from overthinking it.

      I've rambled a bit. I guess what I'm trying to say is.. hmm.. don't drive yourself too nuts with it :)

      about 4 years ago
    • gwendolyn's Avatar
      gwendolyn

      I think you are driving yourself nuts, but that is understandable. The period after the initial diagnosis is the most stressful. Possibly your nervous tension is giving you the aches and pains.

      about 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I had trwo months to sit and stew about it. I know I felt that little bugger growing in my neck. But the smart Dr's didn't think it was a big issue for me to wait 2 months, so I wouldn't worry about it too much. Most of the things that I thought were a need to do right now thing, turned out they weren't that pressing. Still, it's hard to sit and wait.

      about 4 years ago
    • Peroll's Avatar
      Peroll

      I was numb and really didn't feel anything but dispair at the time so I didnlt even feel my normal aches and pains just eht pain from the shock of the diagnosis. Through out my journey I have found that where ever my cancer goes (on its own journey through my body) it has never caused any pain or discomfort. It is truly amazing how it can do the damage without being noticed.

      about 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      No - all 4 times they found my cancer at a very early stage. After treatment and post treatment I've become a "hypochondriac", by which I mean, I'm calling my and seeing my doctors much more often, I take every little thing that is wrong very seriously, especially now when I'm having infusion therapy Partly it's because I know, that if it is serious, every second counts, partly because I think every little thing is a sign of something worse.

      about 4 years ago
    • maralyn's Avatar
      maralyn

      when i first found out, it all happened so fast i didn't get the time to "soak" it all in, then boom, i was in surgery,,, now i await the next surgery, and i understand what you are saying,,, i wonder a bit every time i feel really full, it is that? or is there something growing again inside there??? still haven't really gotten over this bronchitis,10 days no voice, is there something else going on here??? i can tend to overthink things way too much, and work myself up for no reason,,, cancer is a "scarey" word, and i can be my worst enemy,,, get a funny book if you like to read, go to a movie, take a walk, make a gratitude list, i find if i "get away" from the cancer for a while, then when i come back to reality, i seem to have a better perspective on it, and myself!!! i wish you "good thoughts"

      about 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      There is NOTHING NORMAL about CANCER.

      There is a fungal (IMHO) lifeform attacking you and eating you while alive. The doctors don't know your name but promise that if you will only allow them to poison you, they will manage to kill the little alien beasties prior to you expiring.

      I had a different experience than you did. I knew something was out of whack. I had to wait 13 years for doctors to wake up to the fact that the external growth behind my anus was not a benign little wart. By the time the docs had figured that out, it wasn't really so little anymore and I'd just had it removed but it had grown roots into my tissues (pooey) which had to be burned (they said).

      I was in a LOT of pain from the surgery so there was not a whole lot of pain free time to devote to speculation about tumor root travels.

      My suggestion to you is to think positively. If it is necessary, learn meditation or seek a (good) hypnotherapist) to relax and imagine the cancer being routed, dying in any way you like. Imagine yourself healthy and moving freely. Breathe deeply (oxygenate your cells) and steadily.

      I imagined an army of Vikings cutting the slithering beasts to pieces. I imagined Starship Enterprises firing phasers at the aliens, I imagined the things withering under a glaring sun (radiation)with no water available. I did not give the enemy any shape or form because it is hard to kill something you know. I left them as genral hordes of things I needed to sweep out.

      You are, likely too young to remember but there was an old TV show called "Dragnet" and at the end of the show a hand with a hammer stamped a seal onto the screen signalling the end of the drama. I imagined that hand putting a silver seal on my XXX (go ahead and laugh, lol, I am cancer free) which was/is a seal of protection from cancer.

      Imagine yourself well.

      about 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      There is NOTHING NORMAL about CANCER.

      There is a fungal (IMHO) lifeform attacking you and eating you while alive. The doctors don't know your name but promise that if you will only allow them to poison you, they will manage to kill the little alien beasties prior to you expiring.

      I had a different experience than you did. I knew something was out of whack. I had to wait 13 years for doctors to wake up to the fact that the external growth behind my anus was not a benign little wart. By the time the docs had figured that out, it wasn't really so little anymore and I'd just had it removed but it had grown roots into my tissues (pooey) which had to be burned (they said).

      I was in a LOT of pain from the surgery so there was not a whole lot of pain free time to devote to speculation about tumor root travels.

      My suggestion to you is to think positively. If it is necessary, learn meditation or seek a (good) hypnotherapist) to relax and imagine the cancer being routed, dying in any way you like. Imagine yourself healthy and moving freely. Breathe deeply (oxygenate your cells) and steadily.

      I imagined an army of Vikings cutting the slithering beasts to pieces. I imagined Starship Enterprises firing phasers at the aliens, I imagined the things withering under a glaring sun (radiation)with no water available. I did not give the enemy any shape or form because it is hard to kill something you know. I left them as genral hordes of things I needed to sweep out.

      You are, likely too young to remember but there was an old TV show called "Dragnet" and at the end of the show a hand with a hammer stamped a seal onto the screen signalling the end of the drama. I imagined that hand putting a silver seal on my XXX (go ahead and laugh, lol, I am cancer free) which was/is a seal of protection from cancer.

      Imagine yourself well.

      about 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Er, XXX equals arse.

      In my case, cancer left me tired.

      Don't get so tired that you forget to kill the dastards which are living off you.

      Be positive and proactive.

      Imagine a life, your life, without cancer.

      about 4 years ago
    • attypatty's Avatar
      attypatty

      Dear LMM:
      I totally sympathize - I, too, was healthy as a horse as my grandma would say. I never had a thought in my head that I might have cancer. There was no lump, no family history, no weakness or pain - nothing to indicate any warning signs of cancer. So I was totally flabbergasted when I got the diagnosis. Since then, I have begun to wonder what I might be missing - am I not paying attention to my body, not hearing its signals, not recognizing some pain or other indicator as cancer? So, in addition to jumping to a conclusion that it must be cancer every time I experience some new pain, I constantly wonder if, in the absence of pain, might I have tumors starting somewhere else, totally unbeknownst to me? It is enough to drive anyone nuts. So perhaps you can take comfort knowing that you are not nuts in driving yourself nuts. I think it's normal and it happens to all of us.
      Fight On,
      Attypatty

      about 4 years ago
    • fastdog's Avatar
      fastdog

      No, I was scared witless, but didn't imagine every little thing was cancer. I think I just couldn't really take it all in at the time. I do remember telling myself, whatever is in there was in there last week, last month, maybe last year. There is nothing different, except now it has a name, and now something will be done about it. It's so easy to say, "think positive thoughts" and so hard to do it. But, try. Try. And try again.

      about 4 years ago
    • Lirasgirl33's Avatar
      Lirasgirl33

      I can totally relate to you. After being diagnosed with cancer and then waiting for surgery the thought would definitely cross my mind. After all I had a tumor inside me and "cancer" was all new to me. I hadn't really done any research so I didn't know any better. If I got a stomach ache because I ate something that didn't agree with me, I'd worry if it was cancer causing it. If I got a headache I worried if it had spread to my brain. I tried my hardest to just ignore the thoughts and it wasn't until after my surgery that I felt better. The fear of cancer spreading or coming back will always be in the back of our minds but we can't live being controlled by those thoughts. We have to focus on living, after all life is a blessing. Of course if certain pains are persistent then you definitely need to speak with your doctor. Better to let the doc know than just ignore it. Your feelings are normal. Cancer brings along the "unknown". Ask your doctor lots of questions, even those you think might be silly, nothing is silly when it comes to cancer. Also do some research online, but only on dependable websites like the American Cancer Society: http://www.cancer.org/or the National Cancer Institute : http://www.cancer.gov/ . The cancer institute also provides A LOT of printed material that you can order for FREE. It's all very educational. Knowledge is power my friend. I wish you all the best on this journey. Remember, you are not alone. We are all her. Some of us are going through the stages you are, others have been through it, but we're all here to help in any way we can. Remain strong. Keep a positive attitude and kick this cancer to the other side of the moon. Sending hugs your way.

      about 4 years ago
    • seesun87's Avatar
      seesun87

      I see that I'm not the only one that worries about every new ache and pain. I know that I am driving myself crazy. I am trying so hard to keep a positive attitude. Hope does one overcome the fear. I am having trouble thinking about anything in the future. All I seem to do is cry, it's much worse this time of evening. During the day I am working (except the first few days after chemo) had my first treatment Dec, 26th go back for round two tomorrow. I want so bad to win this battle. I just feel so much hopelessness.

      about 4 years ago
    • Harry's Avatar
      Harry

      Dear Seesun,

      Your concerns and fears are perfectly normal. You've just been diagnosed and started treatment. As you progress on this cancer journey you will find that cancer is not always the end. Many people on this forum have survived colon cancer.

      about 4 years ago
    • warrior3's Avatar
      warrior3

      Yeah, you're probably driving yourself nuts but, as the others have said, that is so normal. I went through that more after my treatments and surgery were over. That's when I had the big fear that perhaps nothing had really worked for me and I kept imagining swollen lymph glands and little lumps and bumps, etc... Right now I'm 7 years cancer free and yet I still occasionally have those little worries. Not sure it will ever entirely go away :)

      about 4 years ago
    • Pablo's Avatar
      Pablo

      Absolutely! Though I've been in remission for over a year now, I can still get myself spun up over wierd little pains. It's hard to walk that line between being alarmist and overlooking a serious symptom. Information from a reliable source - your oncologist - helps enormously. Be sure to ask them lots of questions - it really helps.

      over 3 years ago

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