• Workup for possible Non Hodgkin lymphoma

    Asked by Ilovemydoc on Thursday, January 10, 2019

    Workup for possible Non Hodgkin lymphoma

    Because I have at least 4 different sites with lumps and extreme fatigue and 12 years of using Round Up, I know need to start a workup for NHL! Any advise would be greatly appreciated!

    7 Answers from the Community

    7 answers
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      First, if you haven't been diagnosed, I hope you don't get the definitive diagnosis. As for round up, I have used in in the landcape business I own for 30 years, no NHL here, but that doesn't mean I won't get it tomorrow. Have you actually been to an oncologist, tests, scans, etc? Or are you just afraid that you do have it and want to get checked?

      8 days ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Normally, those who used Roundup daily as part of their occupation were most at risk. In the vast majority of lymphoma cases, no cause is even identified. Also, lymph nodes are not cancer detectors, but integral parts of your immune system. If they do not expand, you would quickly succumb to various viruses, bacteria and fungi that you already carry in your body. Paul Allen did not die of lymphoma - rather it was sepsis, massive uncontrollable infection that claimed his life.

      Fatigue? It could be chronic fatigue syndrome, Epstein-Barr virus, mononucleosis or any of millions of unknown viruses that exist on planet earth. Low grade infections can cause fatigue and are very difficult to pinpoint. ,

      As to Glyphosate, the 'suspect" ingredient in Roundup, here is what the web has to say: "There is limited evidence that human cancer risk might increase as a result of occupational exposure to large amounts of glyphosate, such as agricultural work, but no good evidence of such a risk from home use, such as in domestic gardening.[22] The consensus among national pesticide regulatory agencies and scientific organizations is that labeled uses of glyphosate have demonstrated no evidence of human carcinogenicity.[23][24]"

      Much more likely to cause cancer is the benzene in gasoline. Here's hoping that you do not have lymphoma - but there are far worse non-cancerous diseases than lymphoma, actually.

      8 days ago
    • Ilovemydoc's Avatar
      Ilovemydoc

      GregP_WN and po18guy I am only 7 months post op TH, BSO, bilateral pelvic lymph nodes removal for Endometrial cancer. My gynecologic oncologist wants a workup because of the lumps on my neck near my trachea, under my jaw and my armpit. The extreme fatigue is the same as I had with the cancer, not the same as my multiple sclerosis. I have been on antibiotics with no change. Also I have night sweats, fevers the fatigue. I was just asking for advise mainly what I should be asking the PCP for. Also I had a pre op lung CT that showed nodules. Should I just go to my surgeon for a biopsy or to an oncologist. Just confused, so different from the tumor in my endometrial wall.

      8 days ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      The classic "B" symptoms of the various lymphomas (there are 50+ varieties), are the fatigue, unexplained weight loss, spiking fevers, palpable nodes and absolutely drenching night sweats, as in soaked to the skin. However, having had mononucleosis twice, I can attest that its symptoms are identical.

      With your cancer history, I think that having a node excised (NO needle biopsies - they are worthless!) would be warranted. Any surgeon can do the biopsy of an entire node (the size of a small bean or pea, The next step is crucial.

      The biopsy sample "must" go to a very experienced pathology lab. A major cancer research center or university teaching hospital pathology lab. I say this because local pathology labs can actually miss the lymphoma - if that's what it is. They did in my case. Lymphoma can be diabolically hard to diagnose.

      Worst case: let's say it is lymphoma and they tell you that it is stage IV (based on your description, it may be). DO NOT PANIC! Lymphoma is vastly different from all other cancers. It is normally found at late stage, since it is a "liquid cancer' that flows in the blood and lymphatic systems. It is normally found in various locations.

      Late stage does not necessarily indicate an emergency. It mostly directs the treatment strategy. Being in the lymph and blood, the tumor cells have no place to hide -they are sitting ducks. I have been stage IV at least twice, and in 2015 had three cancers simultaneously - so do not panic!

      Next, you need a hematologist rather than an oncologist. Oncologists do not and cannot have the latest in-depth data on lymphoma treatment. A research hematologist is best - particularly one who specializes in the type that a person is diagnosed with. However, we are getting ahead of ourselves.

      I would push for an excisional biopsy and pathology work at a major institution. A lot to digest, but let us know how it goes!

      8 days ago
    • Created07's Avatar
      Created07

      I recently had NHL. I had cancer before...3 times...and one of those was Endometrial. I was just coming out of Breast cancer and was putting lotion on after my shower when I felt a jelly-like lump at and under my cheek bone. I called the next morning and told the oncology nurse what I had found. They got in touch with my breast oncologist and he bought me in for a pet scan. You already have an oncologist. Tell her. After one or more cancers we have to be careful. By the way, the PET scan showed cancer in all my lymph nodes from my neck to my pelvis. That was late 2016, and today I am cancer free. Don't take chances with this precious body you have been given. It may not be anything, but......May God bless.

      8 days ago
    • Created07's Avatar
      Created07

      I recently had NHL. I had cancer before...3 times...and one of those was Endometrial. I was just coming out of Breast cancer and was putting lotion on after my shower when I felt a jelly-like lump at and under my cheek bone. I called the next morning and told the oncology nurse what I had found. They got in touch with my breast oncologist and he bought me in for a pet scan. You already have an oncologist. Tell her. After one or more cancers we have to be careful. By the way, the PET scan showed cancer in all my lymph nodes from my neck to my pelvis. That was late 2016, and today I am cancer free. Don't take chances with this precious body you have been given. It may not be anything, but......May God bless.

      8 days ago
    • Ilovemydoc's Avatar
      Ilovemydoc

      Thanks everyone. All of the comments are appreciated

      8 days ago

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