• Yesterday I mentioned to my clinic where I get treated that I didn't know what I would do if I lost my insurance with all this political

    Asked by LisaR on Wednesday, June 28, 2017

    Yesterday I mentioned to my clinic where I get treated that I didn't know what I would do if I lost my insurance with all this political

    crap going on. The receptionist simply said they would help me find another doctor. Can they just drop me like that?

    16 Answers from the Community

    16 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      Yes. Under Obamacare, i had friends whose BCBS insurance no longer was accepted where i go for treatments. Now, MY employer -paid BCBS insurance was still accepted, but not that which was bought through the Affordable Care Act. They had to change doctors, facilities and everything. It was devastating. They managed to find insurance that would be accepted at our hospital and came back.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Unfortunately, yes, they can. Is it legal? Yes. Is it truly ethical? Not really. But some doctors offices look at it strictly as a business. If you don't have insurance, they are not guaranteed they will be paid. And doctors have their backs against the walls with the political turmoil almost as much as patients do. The ACA brought doctors thousands of new patients who hadn't had insurance before. Now they are facing the loss of all those "customers". I hope for your sake and the sake of millions of others that this does NOT come to pass. Good luck.

      almost 4 years ago
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      Unfortunately they can. I'm glad I live in NYC - the hospitals here will keep me on if I lose insurance (which I won't any longer as I am on Medicare disability), they also have a department that helps with financial aide, and the paper work to get people benefit and insurance that they are entitled to. Also it's been illegal here to refuse coverage for ore-exsiting conditions for 20 years.

      almost 4 years ago
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      We have a county hospital here, too, that cant turn down patients. It is taxpayer funded. Has some incredible doctors. It was the hospital of choice when JFK was assassinated here in Dallas. My doctor works there several days a week. Therenis tons of red tape, but i always knew that ifni got sick when i didn't have insurance, i had a place to go for treatment. Fortunately, that never happened.

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      Er, Livewith, Kennedy did not survive so the fact that John Fitzgerald Kennedy died there is not much of a reference.

      Methinks it is well past time for the USA to have a single payer plan. The heck with tax breaks for the rich or cheap armanents for the Saudis or golf and business weekends for the Trumpillthinskin clan or raises for Congress. The general welfare of the populace comes first in the Nation.

      Then a doctor can turn down who he or she thinks they might, as long as that doctor is not part of the insurance system. Private insurers are just Triple D blood suckers as I see it.

      Delay
      Deny
      Dont pay

      unless the patient knows of BuckeyeShelby and/or her compatriots.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      No offense taken, Geekling. I don't work for one of the big insurance companies. I work for a TPA, mostly self-insured employer groups. Which means that the bills are paid directly by the employer group, not from a pool of premiums. I know some of the big companies have beautiful campuses, lots of perks, etc. We don't. Our ice machine is broken half the time. Our AC went out a couple weeks ago, and it was almost 90 inside the building, and they didn't send us home. Yeah, no big perks lining most pockets here!

      almost 4 years ago
    • geekling's Avatar
      geekling

      @BuckeyeShelby, lol, I was trying to give you a compliment!!

      You are the only person who can give any positive advice as to how to deal with insurance!!

      Even when I had enough cash, it wasnt good enough. When I got billed for copays, I simply wrote one check totalling about twenty thousand dollars. Then I still got bills!! I finally called the billing agency to find out what was up. I was told I was a deadbeat. I explained I was paid up and asked to speak to a supervisor. Since the argument was about what was then a substantial amount of moolah, the company owner got on the horn. Once he heard my name things got easier because I had sold him a house a few years before. When he told me his name, I remembered and told him how happy I was for him and the wife that they were doing well. He checked into it as I gave him the date and check number and discovered the clerk had dumped the funds into one account and left the other creditors waiting. He promised to fix things just as I had accommodated him when he was struggling. One shouldnt need a personal reference to get service.

      Sorry you werent sent home at 90 degrees. They should have, at least, provided drinks and ice or broke open a window. Things can go south fast in a building that "warm" with bodies and paper providing humidity.

      almost 4 years ago
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I have insurance that is private, but its' not much good. However, it will get me in the door and able to see most doctors and have all procedures done that I have needed. The catch? It leaves me about half of the bill to pay. But, they don't turn me away. I did have an issue with the facility that I go to, for the last 9 years, they have collected hundreds of thousands from my insurance. It's a large facility with multiple clinics, one for any problem you may need. I contacted their urology department for an appointment, and the scheduler told me they couldn't see me because they didn't take my insurance. Now, remember 3 or 4 lines ago when I said they have collected hundreds of thousands? Yep, same facility. I asked the young lady if they were a part of the overall facility? Yes. So if the other clinics take it why wouldn't your clinic take it? I don't know sir, we just don't. So I went through this laurel and hardy routine with her for a few minutes until I was convinced she was looking at a magazine while giving me the canned answers. I just gave up and went to a local urologist. BUT, it could have all been the same if it was for an oncologist and they wouldn't see me. People are going to be in a whole lot of trouble if this doesn't get fixed.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      LisaR, doctors have the legal right to drop you even if you do have insurance they are providers for. They can't be forced to see a patient that they have notified they will not see, which is called "firing" a patient, and is usually done because of rudeness of the patient.

      I know you asked about insurance, but sometimes the insurance doesn't ask the doctor to be a provider on the policy, so it's not really that the doctor doesn't "take the insurance." Sometimes insurance policies only cover doctors who go to a specific hospital, because they've possibly negotiated to pay a lower price for services, and random doctors wouldn't be willing to do that. The doctors on the insurance contract also have to apply with credentials and be approved by the insurance company to be providers.

      That said, I don't expect you to lose your insurance because of the new healthcare. Things I've heard mentioned are able bodied young people will have to go to work rather than be on Medicaid, which is the way it always was until Obama changed it.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      BarbarainBham above quips..... "Things I've heard mentioned are able bodied young people will have to go to work rather than be on Medicaid, which is the way it always was until Obama changed it."

      My daughter is on Obamacare with extra supplemental help as her income is so low. It is very close to being on Medicaid. She has a degree from Ohio State U. She has worked part & full time since the age of 16. She lost a very well-paying job about a year ago & had to go on Obamacare. Now she is working free-lance graphic design, doing part-time care of elderly & disabled clients, house & pet sitting, and cleaning houses. She has even had to do some landscape labor.---- ALL of those, Barbara!

      So please, watch your generalizations of those on Medicare and other kinds of governmental insurance for low income Americans. It is quite petty and untrue.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      Barbara, I remember one of my injured workers getting fired from her Provider of Record back when I was a workers comp adjuster. Oh, she was a drug seeker, and went into the doctors office screaming and cursing. It was bad. Her actual dr was out, so one of the other drs threw her out and told her never to come into the practice again. They almost called the cops on her.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Jalemans' Avatar
      Jalemans

      Things are so out of wack! When the ACA was instilled, our employer-sponsored private insurance premiums went WAY up, but as long as we could manage, I was OK with that because everybody could get insurance. Now, it looks like people won't be able to get insurance again. Will our premiums & coverage return to pre-Obama care rates? Not a chance!

      The "pre-existing" issue is quite concerning obviously...

      almost 4 years ago
    • DoreenLouise's Avatar
      DoreenLouise

      Those 50 and older may not be able to afford health insurance.

      almost 4 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      To BuckeyeShelby, thanks for sharing that story. I'm always surprised when patients don't know a doctor legally has the option not to see a patient---imagine going thru school and residency all those years and when you finally went to work, you had to put up with screaming, cursing patients!

      To Molly72, I do try to avoid petty and untrue statements, but need you to tell me specifically what is petty or untrue about what I said. Here's my quote:

      "That said, I don't expect you to lose your insurance because of the new healthcare. Things I've heard mentioned are able bodied young people will have to go to work rather than be on Medicaid, which is the way it always was until Obama changed it."

      I was explaining one reason for people the CBO said would lose their insurance. I hope your daughter finds a full-time job soon. Sometimes relocating helps.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Molly72's Avatar
      Molly72

      I will repeat your untrue & petty & generalized statement:
      "able bodied young people will have to go to work rather than be on Medicaid, which is the way it always was until Obama changed it."

      Let's not be callous about young people who do work, do work hard and for very little money.
      They can not afford medical insurance, and it looks like in the future, if our selfish Republicans
      in Washington have their way, 14 + million Americans will also not be able to have any insurance.

      Many young people are working, or furthering their education, or even raising a family. They are doing the best that they can. Not all have had the social/economic upbringing that you & I have had. Not to empathize with them is neither helping them or even yourself.

      almost 4 years ago
    • Jalemans' Avatar
      Jalemans

      Hmm... I can only speak from my own experience, but, I know many young working people who were able to get insurance due to the ACA who would otherwise not be able to afford ins otherwise. These people are bank tellers, customer service reps, hair stylists, and food servers. At $10/hr, for example, they only gross @ $20K/yr if they work full time. A simple apartment costs @$1000/mo. Then they have food & transportation costs.

      I have never met a single person who didn't work because they could get medical insurance by not working.

      I think there is a misconception about this.

      almost 4 years ago

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