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    amt shared an experience

    Oh No: My sweet father lost his fight early Tuesday March 12. I'm thankful he did not suffer longer. I'm glad I had this forum in which to find comfort & I pray for a cure soon.

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    amt shared a photo

    Wall_img_0026

    My Dad

    2 Comments
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      Reminds me so much of my dad, I lost him to cancer too 3 years ago.

      about 4 years ago
    • DaveWaz's Avatar
      DaveWaz

      I love my Dad.

      about 4 years ago
  • amt's Avatar

    amt asked a questionLung Cancer

    Why no surgery?

    5 answers
    • AlizaMLS's Avatar
      AlizaMLS

      Dear amt,

      I agree with SueRae1 re your phoning your dad's oncologist to find out why. But from my own experience (with my late Mom), surgeons are not so anxious to operate on an elderly frail patient (so many variables that can go amiss). Having been married to a physician (not a surgeon), I can tell you that doctors like to try and avoid potential lawsuits whenever possible.

      I hope your dad's not in any pain or discomfort and that he still has a good deal of time to enjoy being with you regardless of surgery.

      Warm wishes,
      AlizaMLS

      about 4 years ago
    • CAS1's Avatar
      CAS1

      What about Radiation? This is a potentially curative option to surgery..SBRT or IMRT or Cyber knife and potentially proton therapy which are even milder than the others especially for an elderly person.

      about 4 years ago
    • CherylS@StF's Avatar
      CherylS@StF

      amt
      Although age can sometimes be a potential risk factor in thoracic surgery it does not exclude cancer physicians from exploring the possibility of a patient having surgery. Surgery is offered to patients when there tumor is confined to one area in the chest and has not spread from that location to another location, such as chest to liver, chest to brain, or any other organs within the body. If the cancer did start in the chest and moved to other areas it would be considered metastatic disease. Often the tumor in the chest is not in a location that is ammenable to surgery and that excludes the patient from being a surgical candidate. At St. Francis Hospital we have a Multidisciplinary Lung Clinic every Thursday morning. Patients medical history and their scans are reviewed in the clinic by Thoracic Surgeons, Medical Oncology, Radiation Oncology, Pulmonology and Radiolgsist. This allows the physicians to assess all the possible treatment options available for the patient, determine what treatment options are excluded and what is the best treatment option for the patient. Once the patients medical history, testing and current health have been assessed it is determined if they are candidate for surgery, SBRT (stereotactic radiation therapy), chemotherapy or radiation or chemotherapy & radiation combined. There are times when a patient can decide between having surgery of SBRT (less invasive) This is a huge benefit for patients/families to know that all the treatment modalities were explored, considered and discussed amonst each other and then with the patients/families. The next time your father has an appointment with his Oncologist ask him to explain why your father was not a surgical candidate, it will give you and your father an answer to your question and some peace of mind. I wish you and your father all the best. I lost my father to lung cancer at 74 and understand that you want to do the very best for him.

      about 4 years ago
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    amt shared an experience

    Procedure or Surgery (Long-term catheter): Dad had a lung cath inserted to drain the fluid. It has been drained 3x within 6 days, each time getting a liter of fluid. This concerns me. Hopefully the chemo will help reduce that.

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    amt posted an update

    OK. Dad had a PET scan 3/2. Results show "some spots" in the liver and bone. He has completed 2 days of chemo; 3rd day is today. He had a brain MRI yesterday. The oncologist said if there is cancer in the brain then treatment will most likely be stopped. He said if there is no cancer there, then the next 10 days are critical--dad needs to show signs of improvement in strength and such, which shows the chemo is helping. If not, then he said treatment should probably stop and he would begin comfort care.
    I don't know the severity of the cancer in the lung; I don't feel like it will be completely cured/remission as he is 83 and already was weak/worn out.

    I hate this cancer. I never knew it was like this and I feel so much gratitude for those who work to help patients, those who work to cure it, and those who are family/friends who care for those with cancer. For the people with cancer--KEEP FIGHTING.

    1 Comment
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      I agree with everything about those who are searching for a cure they are great, smart people.

      about 4 years ago
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