• Blaze's Avatar

    Blaze started following

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    Blaze asked a questionCervical Cancer

    Broken and hopeless

    24 answers
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Let your son take care of FAFSA-student aid and loans. you shouldn't be mentioning this. every year thousands of students- 18 and up-foreign, military that are posted in Afghanistan and enrolling by computer, and disabled in a vaiety of ways all apply for Pell grants, VA grants, scholarships, and unsubsidised and subsidised student loans.

      You need to talk to your family about this. if your son is obscessing about this, he should go to a school counselor-talk to friends-get a part-time job- change to a cheaper school- finish his second year at a community college- but his school finances shouldn't be part of your worry-it might help if you get a med for your anxiety- Another way is to quit bothering him about school financing. Thousands of students get financial help on their own every year. He's not alone.

      over 3 years ago
    • Sharlie's Avatar
      Sharlie

      Thinking of you Blaze and sending positive energy your way.

      over 3 years ago
    • MsMope's Avatar
      MsMope

      You may qualify for a Medicaid program in your state or health care insurance via healthcare.gov. I was on our state's Medicaid program when I was diagnosed with uterine cancer. I switched to an Obamacare plan in the middle of chemo when our Republican governor down-sized state Medicaid rather than accept federal money for it. Boo! Luckily, we got a subsidy via Obamacare.

      Anyway, both plans were life-savers. We would have lost almost everything if we had to pay full-price for the care I needed. With insurance, we paid the lower prices negotiated by our healthcare insurer. Yes, the deductible was a lot, but it was TONS less than full price. For two years I met my deductible half-way thru the year. In reality, we paid what we could as we were billed by providers, then put the rest on our home equity line of credit. This gave us some breathing room.

      Cancer sucks. It sucks in so many ways, but the most important thing for you to do is to get beyond the parts where cancer sucks the worst. Get help from everywhere and everyone. The American Cancer Society can help a lot. If you're getting care in a hospital, there are people paid to help you - social workers and such.

      I wish you well. I wish you luck. I hope you get past this tight spot. I can tell you for a fact: if you can get beyond the suckiest parts, you will one day get to a place where you can count blessings and be a help to cancer newbies. You can do this! -MM

      over 3 years ago
  • Blaze's Avatar

    Blaze started following

    Question: Helping others

  • Blaze's Avatar

    Blaze asked a questionCervical Cancer

    Helping others

    18 answers
    • LiveWithCancer's Avatar
      LiveWithCancer

      @BarbarainBham, after I saw that JudyinFlorida had passed away, I went to her wall. Her sister posted the note about her passing there. Somehow, I missed seeing that update :( :( IronMom's aunt did the same thing - posted about her passing on her wall (I believe they created "updates" ... but I could be wrong.) As sad as I always am to learn that one of us has passed away, I am so happy that family provides us with the final update.

      over 3 years ago
    • CAS1's Avatar
      CAS1

      I missed Judy in Florida's passing, I had seen IronMom Aunt's posting and it was so sad as was her Obituary..We never found out what happened to Glam and several other people as well and that's so hard not knowing.

      I think paying it forward is just as rewarding even if Cancer is not involved.. Many different ways you can do that. You can also offer to your oncologist to help any future patients coming through who might use some support. This is how I get Cancer coaching opportunities that I really am grateful to be able to help someone with.

      over 3 years ago
    • BarbarainBham's Avatar
      BarbarainBham

      Has anybody heard from Nonnie0917 lately?

      over 3 years ago
  • Blaze's Avatar

    Blaze asked a questionCervical Cancer

    After treatment and getting back into life

    8 answers
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      It took me 18 months to fully recover from chemo brain. What helped me most was being part of a Bible Study group. But a book club or any other sort of supportive discussion group would work as well. As a necessity to survival I got interested in nutrition that led to a whole new interest cooking. I went from being eligible to be the worst cook in America to actually a good cook. Cooking really challenged my brain.
      Don't think that your lack of interest at the beach was abnormal you are only two months out of treatment. Fatigue from treatment can last for a long time. Your body is probably just too dam-n tired to frolic in the surf. On your next visit you might just relax and enjoy the sights, smells, and sounds of the beach. Next summer you will be frolicking in the waves

      over 3 years ago
    • Ejourneys' Avatar
      Ejourneys

      Chemo effects can last for years. (I'm almost two years out and still deal with fatigue and vertigo.) I've been on a reading jag because my brain couldn't handle books during chemo. I still have fun, but in a much quieter way. Exercise helps -- it also helped me through treatment. Listen to your body and cut yourself a lot of slack. It will tell you when it's ready.

      over 3 years ago
    • Blaze's Avatar
      Blaze

      Thank you everyone for your responses. I find your suggestions very helpful and encouraging. It so good to hear from people who have had similar issues. I feel less alone and I think I will take up juggling! Well wishes to everyone!

      over 3 years ago
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