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    Bloodproblems asked a questionMultiple Myeloma

    I am being treated at the major health facility near where I live, and they accept my insurance.

    5 answers
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      Many facilities now treat doctors and or their practices as subcontractors. I'm guessing that is what is going on.

      5 days ago
    • Bengal's Avatar
      Bengal

      Just one thing that universal health care would fix. My eye care center just dropped all of it's patients covered by a particular insurer. Just informed them they were no longer welcome, find somebody else. Up here there are not that many choices but it was either find another doctor or change your insurer. Seems strange though that this could happen within the same facility but apparently it does. And, as I 've said before, people who are dealing with serious illness (or any illness) DON'T need to be dealing with this crap. Sorry you have to.

      5 days ago
    • BuckeyeShelby's Avatar
      BuckeyeShelby

      I'm the one who works for a medical TPA. We aren't insurance; we just administer claims. We work w/a LOT of different networks from the big guys, like Cigna, UHC, Aetna. In a lot of cases, the contract with the insurance company is with the physician, not with the facility. So one doctor could be in network, but the guy across the hall in not. Now, most of our plans have what is called an "ology" benefit. That means if you go to an in network ER, it doesn't matter if a dr in is in or out of network. Or if you are in surgery, your anesthesiologist doesn't need to be in network, since you can't generally choose that specialist.

      5 days ago
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    Bloodproblems asked a questionMultiple Myeloma

    Has anyone started taking antidepressants after you were diagnosed?

    8 answers
    • DJS's Avatar
      DJS

      Absolutely. They made a world of difference for me, and I am so grateful I had them. Remembering that they help restore your chemical imbalance at a time when chemo, added medications, and personal stress are likely to knock it off its usual even keel may make it easier for you to decide to let this help you get you back to center yourself. That’s all a good antidepressant should do - let you be you; not plaster a fake smile on your face. Anti anxiety meds are great, too, if you need just temporary boosts. Get help if/when you need it.

      14 days ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      I've never taken anything with reason.And I've survived with a reason.

      14 days ago
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      Sorry to hear this. Withdrawing into the self is a natural, but not very beneficial reaction. Counseling of other psychological assistance might be worth looking into. If you are able,some form of helping others, from volunteer work to online interaction will expand your horizon, exposing you to others who share your situation, or are actually in worse shape. Focusing on them takes your focus off of yourself, and your self-worth will gain from the knowledge that you have helped.

      Balance this with keeping up with doctor's recommendations as to activity and medication. But, you are reaching out here, and so there are others that may also benefit from contact with you.

      Lastly, there is an anti-depression/anti-anxiety drug called Trazodone which can be very effective. Non-addicting, it is available in low-cost generic form. It is a 'clean drug' in that side effects are mild and actually beneficial (they help you to sleep soundly). You may start and stop as you need to. Consider asking doctor about it.

      If you do take it, do so as you are lying down to sleep. It is metabolized quickly and best to be close to your pillow when you take it. Otherwise, you'll be stumbling around like a drunk - don't ask me how I know!

      12 days ago
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    Bloodproblems shared a photo

    Wall_i_fight_for_my_health_every_day

    Some of us cancer patients might not "look like" a cancer patient, whatever that is supposed to be, but we all fight. Cancer does not look the same on all of us!

    5 Comments
    • meyati's Avatar
      meyati

      Oh, I never took money from anybody, and because I had face-head cancer-I went into seclusion-

      18 days ago
    • PaulineJ's Avatar
      PaulineJ

      No one ever showed concern on my health .I don't think they believed me or cared.

      18 days ago
    • BoiseB's Avatar
      BoiseB

      I have been plagued with chronic pain and fatigue since I was 5 I contracted Brucellosis I had a fever of 102+ for almost a year. That left me with chronic pain and fatigue (the Dr. tells me that that was fibromyalgia) I remember the Easter after I had got the disease and was still running a temperature we went to Salt Lake City to visit my Grandfather. My mother took advantage of the visit to go shopping in the department stores. I was in such pain, I fell down and started crying. That made my mother very angry. She said I was making a scene. But my father picked me up and carried me the rest of the day. I think that was the day, I learned to hide pain and illness. In fact the worse I feel the more careful about my appearance I am.

      18 days ago