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    Question: Hearing Voices

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    ChristinaWhite wrote on mamoose's wall

    I'm sorry to hear your diagnosis. It's such a scary time I know everything seems petty compared to what you're going through. Please know that there IS hope. Do exactly as the doctors tell you & listen very closely to your friends & family. They are great support when you need a laugh or even advise. Most importantly is stay ACTIVE. The stronger your body is the better you feel during treatment.
    Good luck on your journey through this life experience & God be with you.

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    ChristinaWhite asked a questionCervical Cancer

    A year later I'm still having neuropathy and continuous pain. why?

    17 answers
    • kalindria's Avatar
      kalindria

      Judt1940 - look at it this way, if it wasn't for you and the rest of his patients, your oncologist wouldn't have a job. It's not about respect or the lack of it - you are just as important as he is. And department head or not, patient care is a big part of what he signed up for. You should never feel your concerns aren't important enough to call him.

      over 5 years ago
    • lilymadeline's Avatar
      lilymadeline

      Hi Christinawhite, Yes some chemos cause permanent neuropathy but the chemo brain will go away with work. But please tell your oncologist that you seriously need help because things could be better for you and you shouldn't be living in pain! Tell him or her that you can't stand it, and that your quality of life is unbearable! Be a drama queen if you have to! There are things that can be done for neuropathy pain and chemo brain as well, in fact nearly all of the cancer treatment side effects can be helped with patience and work. First make sure that you are taking care of your body, diet, exercise, and sleep are important and nonnegotiable to a good quality of life. Ask to see a dietitian because diet can help with neuropathy and chemo brain, vitamin Bs seems to help me with the neuropathy. I also take Lyrica which also helps tremendously and is worth trying but it doesn't work for everybody.
      But acupuncture has worked very well for many of the women in my cancer support groups, really it seems to do the trick for neuropathy! So try that! Ask your oncologist about that, most cancer centers have them now, and ask to see a pain management specialist as well.
      And for the chemo brain- I took an actual class in chemo brain but in brief you need to exercise your brain and use it differently, you know how we all do stuff on automatic pilot? drive down the same roads, do things in the same pattern? well, shake that up! use your right hand instead of your left, drive down different streets! exercise daily and do an exercise where you need to think such as tennis or ballroom dancing! walking on a treadmill is fine but is useless as far as your mind is concerned and you need to be doing exercise where you have to be actively thinking about what you are doing! If you always put your right leg of your pants on first, try putting your left leg on first. You need to do things differently so that you are actively thinking and concentrating about what you are doing. And taking up something like chess is also a great idea.
      And please if your oncologist isn't helpful with your problems, please look and find a different one! Many doctors are overworked or just plain lazy! I had to look very hard myself to find a great oncologist that was also deeply concerned about my quality of life. Every little complaint he takes seriously and looks for a solution for. That is what you need as well, so find it! Or have a deep conversation with your current doctor and get him to help you more. Good luck to you and God bless!

      over 5 years ago
    • Judt1940's Avatar
      Judt1940

      I would never shy away calling my oncologist if I felt what was going on was just chemo/cancer related. I went into treatment with problems: neuropathy ( made worse with chemo, had for years), extreme osteoporosis (back surgeon said my bones were translucent) and spinal stenosis with compression fractures. I think we all likely had some pre-existing problems especially when we fall into the elderly. My PCP is familiar and watching these other things. As you know getting pain meds is differcult now (every month written prescription). I'm an hour away from my oncologist but the group does have a lab locally. No one makes a move without consulting your oncologist. I feel fortunate that I have doctors that actually do inform one another. I have nothing but admiration for those that go into health care. There are those that shouldn't but I feel so blessed to have the doctors I have.

      over 5 years ago
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    ChristinaWhite shared an experience

    Procedure or Surgery (Radical hysterectomy)