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    Coloman asked a questionColorectal (Colon) Cancer

    I am getting to that point where I can't taste much or what I do tastes terrible.

    4 answers
    • po18guy's Avatar
      po18guy

      I think Bengal's idea of non-metallic utensils is a great one. The only adaptation that I could make was to scan the pantry for something which looked somewhat appealing. When I saw something that I thought I could get down and keep down, I ate it immediately - as later in the day, I might not be able to. You might notice the days post-treatment which are the worst and eat a little more in the days before, if that is possible. I practiced fasting before all of this, so it came as less of a shock, but still a shock. I would advise you to simply keep trying things until you find something workable. The oncology nurses often have a wealth of information on this, from both their training and experience.

      2 days ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      They also say that a sour pickle or sucking on a lemon helps restore our sense of taste. My comfort foods didn't taste good - I ended up craving and eating chili and Mexican food.

      1 day ago
    • PattyF's Avatar
      PattyF

      My last treatment was August 28th and my taste is back to normal and I am able to eat just about everything once again. During treatments I noticed I was more sensitive to spicier foods and could not tolerate. I also remember most foods were unappealing to me on infusions days or I would have strange cravings like chips and dip, pretzels, chicken noodle soup, etc. Do your best to eat what you can. I also made sure I stayed hydrated - I would fill up a 64oz pitcher of water and make sure I drank the entire amount before going to bed. It was a huge help with flushing the chemicals through my body and my recovery time was shorter after each infusion as well.

      1 day ago
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    Coloman asked a questionColorectal (Colon) Cancer

    I am still seeing people that I've known for years that didn't know I have been diagnosed

    7 answers
    • PattyF's Avatar
      PattyF

      lo15 nailed it - you find out who your true friends are. I am blessed to have had so many people reach out to me during my diagnosis and treatments - it was truly heartwarming. At the same time, my own mother in law (and a few sister in laws), not once, asked how I was doing, if I needed anything, or to say she was praying for me. My father in law passed away from a different kind of cancer 5 years prior so she is very familiar with what goes on when a loved one has cancer. To say their lack of "concern" for me was hurtful is an understatement. I have moved on and won't let it change who I am as a person. I am grateful and thankful for my family and friends who HAVE been by my side throughout this journey.

      11 days ago
    • JaneA's Avatar
      JaneA

      Many people are uncomfortable with their own mortality so when someone they know gets cancer, it hits them that this can happen to them too. They just back off from us because the possibility of cancer scares them so much. Like lo15 says, we do find out who our friends are.

      11 days ago
    • MyLungCancer's Avatar
      MyLungCancer

      I tend to play down the severity in some cases when someone is acting that way. I know what you mean about it being awkward, sometimes the silence is deafening. I try to make them feel better by changing the subject or by assuring them that everything is going to be fine. And yes, good friends are there and are in it with you.

      11 days ago
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    I hope everyone is having a good week of killing cancer this week.

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