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    DaisyMae asked a questionColorectal (Colon) Cancer

    Will I ever be able to live without constant worry about the next lab/exam?

    9 answers
    • SueRae1's Avatar
      SueRae1

      Hugs, and congrats on being in remission for 2 years. The anxiety is always there, but the time frames are shortened. For me the worst part is the time between the scans and the results. My oncologist has them scheduled for a 3 days before I see him/her. This way the results are in when I get to the office, and the wait is minimal. I see my breast surgeon the same day as my Mamo , so it's only the the day or so before the test that has me on pins and needles.

      about 2 years ago
    • CAS1's Avatar
      CAS1

      I think it comes down to accepting that we all die. We can walk out the door and get hit by a car.
      We are all here on a temporary basis.
      I have found accepting this and not being fearful of dying has taken away the anxiety. In many ways cancer should help us get our house in order so to speak. If you can try and look at it this way maybe it will help you too. I hope so.
      Maybe you can volunteer in the children's cancer center.. That always changes my outlook to the positive.

      about 2 years ago
    • kj7lo's Avatar
      kj7lo

      This is my opinion and belief. Each individual responds differently to any treatment: The only thing that kills cancer and keeps it away is your own immune system. Chemotherapy, radiation and surgery eliminate the tumors. Once they are gone you need to address your immune system. The three keys for me were a cancer friendly diet (Mine was completely organic Mediterranean diet), keep fighting and do whatever possible to keep a positive attitude and hope, and get a good night's sleep.
      FYI, I had stage IV colon cancer that was inoperable because of size and location, and two tumors the size of mangoes on my liver. They were gone in 6 months with my medical oncologist (chemotherapy) working with my naturopathic oncologist. I started the diet, supplements, and trying to get a good night's sleep at the same time I started chemotherapy.

      about 2 years ago
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    DaisyMae shared an experience

    Celebration (Remission): Despite the effects that have been left to me from the chemo, I am happy to report I have been in remission two years now.

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    DaisyMae shared an experience

    Celebration (Remission)

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    DaisyMae shared an experience

    Milestones: Just a personal note to all... It is possible to be a survivor of colorectal cancer stage IV. My chemo treatment, after surgery, was aggressive and lasted 6 months. I finished treatments I July and have recently revisited the oncologist who says my labs look great, and there is no new evidence of cancer! Hurray for that! I do know the statistics on this cancer put me at a high risk for active cancer again, and that it metasticized so far from its original location puts me at an even higher risk.... However, I want to say, stay positive, keep pushing through, recognize when you are feeling down or need help and don't be afraid to ask for it for fear of burdening someone else. If they care about you they will be honored to help in any way possible for them and their life situation. For now, I shall live for today as best as possible and cherish every moment I have alone, with family and friends, etc! And prepare for my summer wedding which crafts for this have kept me occupied! God bless and good luck!