• DavidEmerson's Avatar

    DavidEmerson asked a questionMultiple Myeloma

    What can a cancer coach do for me?

    • fastdog's Avatar
      fastdog

      If I played basketball, I'd want a coach. If I played baseball, I'd want a coach. I've never heard of a cancer coach, and would be very leery. I only skimmed the URL you sent. I've heard of a "life coach" and have always wondered if this is a snake-oil salesman kind of thing. I can live my life, do I need a coach to do it? Nope. I have cancer, do I need a coach for that? I have an oncologist, nurses, a surgeon, friends and family and various online support groups. Since there is so much information and support available in places like What Next site fort free, I guess my question would be, why look elsewhere, what advantage, is this service? Is there a fee? If there is a charge, I would run the other way, as fast as I could.

      over 3 years ago
    • Clyde's Avatar
      Clyde

      I didn't realize cancer was a competitive sport. If that is the case, I want to join the chess club.

      over 3 years ago
    • Clyde's Avatar
      Clyde

      I'm going to offer another response that is less facetious. A cancer coach, sound to me like nothing more than a private shrink. Someone to speak too about your fears, your treatments etc. Why not just check with your center for what mental health they offer? Almost every center I know of has some sort of consultation service. It will probably be covered by your insurance (the coach won't), will be in contact with your Drs on a friendly basis (chances your coach won't) and could be a much easier way to the goal you are seeking.

      A coach will certainly have more of a financial stake in you following their orders than the center will, so I would look there first.

      over 3 years ago
  • DavidEmerson's Avatar

    DavidEmerson posted an update

    Do any cancer survivors feel like they have chemobrain? If so, what symptoms do you experience? What can you do about it?

    http://peoplebeatingcancer.org/blog-entry/my-chemobrain-doesnt-feel-microscopic-me-chemotherapy-associated-microscopic-changes-brai

    David Emerson
    PeopleBeatingCancer.org

  • DavidEmerson's Avatar
  • DavidEmerson's Avatar

    DavidEmerson shared an experience

    Other Care (exercise, nutrition, supplementation, hyperthermia ): Multiple myeloma is an incurable cancer meaning survivors always relapse. Always. Knowing this, when I achieved complete remission 4/99, I decided to work hard to stay in remission as long as possible.

    I exercise, supplement, eat organic fruit and veggies (mostly) and detox (hyperthermia) in an effort to stay cancer free. As of today, 2/1/12 I have been cancer free since 4/99.

  • DavidEmerson's Avatar

    DavidEmerson shared an experience

    Decision Point: An appointment with my oncologist on September 27th 1997 became a turning point for me. My onc told me that "nothing more can be done for you..." In fact, I had undergone aggressive conventional therapies and from my onc's point of view, I had relapsed repeatedly and there really was nothing more that conventional oncology could offer.

    I decide to take responsibility for my health and begin learning about what other cancer therapies were out there and what might help me.

    I chose to have an appointment at the Burzynski Research Institute (BRI) in Houston Tx in 11/97 and began antineoplaston therapy (ANP) on 11/3/97.

    I achieved complete remission by 4/99 and have been cancer free ever since.

    http://peoplebeatingcancer.org/about-david

    1 Comment
    • Gma's Avatar
      Gma

      That is great to hear. God Bless you.

      about 4 years ago
  • DavidEmerson's Avatar

    DavidEmerson shared an experience

    Radiation (External radiation ): I underwent local radiation to my neck soon after my diagnosis 2/94 and again upon my second relapse in 10/96. The second local radiation to my iliac crest resulted in sterility and lumbo-sacral plexopathy or nerve damage.