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    Breast Cancer Clinical Trial Seeking Participants

    I'm happy to announce that I've signed on as a Cure Click Trial Ambassador. Cure Click is an initiative started in partnership with WEGO Health designed to spread the word about important clinical trials by mobilizing health activists such as myself.

    The first clinical trial I've learned about evaluates a new potential treatment for HR+/HER2- breast cancer. The majority of breast cancers are hormone-receptor positive (HR+), which means the cancer cells grow in response to hormones. Such cancers are typically treated with hormonal therapy.

    Read more at http://www.wherewegonow.com/debbies-blog/breast-cancer-clinical-trial-seeking-participants

    1 Comment
    • GregP_WN's Avatar
      GregP_WN

      As allways, thanks for posting Debbie!

      over 2 years ago
  • DebbieWoodbury's Avatar

    DebbieWoodbury posted an update

    Do you have difficulty sleeping or staying asleep during the night?

    I sure do. I've always been prone to insomnia but, while I was undergoing cancer treatment, it was especially bad.

    I've learned the hard way that the best way to keep yourself wide awake is to freak out about not sleeping. Now I know that putting the focus on relaxation, rather than sleep, is the key.

    It's impossible to relax and fall asleep if you've been tense all day. To help you get relaxed, I share nine tips in my latest CURE article.

    It's Time for Bed. Are You Too Tense to Sleep?

    Read more at CURE.

    http://www.curetoday.com/community/debbie-woodbury/2015/01/its-time-for-bed-are-you-too-tense-to-sleep#sthash

    Wishing you a great night's sleep!

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    DebbieWoodbury posted an update

    Do You Need a Time Out from Cancer?

    “I think, therefore I am.” René Descartes

    I think a lot and have always assumed the millions of thoughts banging around in my head were productive. Sure, I end up worrying nonstop too, but that’s the price of thinking things through and problem solving, right?

    With apologies to Descartes, I tend to believe, “I think, therefore I am working the problem.”

    Over the years, infertility, miscarriages and breast cancer worked my mind to exhaustion. When I was under siege, sleep was the only break I got and it never came easily or lasted long enough. As soon as I opened my eyes, the thoughts were there again, right where they left off.

    As painful and fatiguing as all that thinking (and worrying) was, I felt compelled to keep at it. In truth, I was in a continuous thought loop and couldn’t get out.

    What I needed was a time-out.

    My first cancer time-out came as a complete surprise from an unlikely source. My very long diagnostic and testing phase was finally over and I was facing a mastectomy. Cancer had been my 24/7 companion for five months and inhabited my every thought. I was beyond tired, scared to death of the surgery, and my mind was racing.

    Basically, I was freaking out.

    Suddenly, out of nowhere this popped into my head:

    Read more at: http://www.curetoday.com/community/debbie-woodbury/2014/12/do-you-need-a-time-out-from-cancer

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    DebbieWoodbury posted an update

    Do You Need a Time Out from Cancer?

    The mental noise that comes with cancer is deafening. Taking cancer time-outs can quiet your anxiety.

    I think a lot and have always assumed the millions of thoughts banging around in my head were productive. Sure, I end up worrying nonstop too, but that’s the price of thinking things through and problem solving, right?

    With apologies to Descartes, I tend to believe, “I think, therefore I am working the problem.”

    Over the years, infertility, miscarriages and breast cancer worked my mind to exhaustion. When I was under siege, sleep was the only break I got and it never came easily or lasted long enough. As soon as I opened my eyes, the thoughts were there again, right where they left off.

    As painful and fatiguing as all that thinking (and worrying) was, I felt compelled to keep at it. In truth, I was in a continuous thought loop and couldn’t get out.

    What I needed was a time-out.

    Read more at http://www.curetoday.com/community/debbie-woodbury/2014/12/do-you-need-a-time-out-from-cancer.

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    User: CancerNews

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    Are you struggling with survivor's guilt? You're not alone. The post I wrote on this subject is the most visited and commented upon of any that I've written and it continues to get comments to this day. This is obviously a subject we need to talk about:

    Someone finally said it out loud. I’ve been thinking it since my diagnosis and, finally, someone actually said it. She was an older woman, who was obviously upset and angry about her battle with ovarian cancer. We came together while I was manning a table in the lobby of the cancer center with Sarah Mandel. We were there to talk about breast and ovarian cancer awareness.

    She walked up to the table, perused the offerings and thumped an ovarian cancer handout, stating, “That’s me.” We sympathized and talked with her about her journey. At one point, however, she said, “I have stage 3; my friend has stage 1 – which is like having a pimple.”

    I turned my face away from her, I couldn’t look at her straight on anymore, but I said nothing. I felt her pain and anger at her disease, but what she said caused me pain too.

    I am sure she never would have expressed that opinion directly to her friend. But what she didn’t consider was that there was someone sitting right in front of her who was diagnosed with Stage 0 and I did hear what she said. With that one pronouncement, she made it very clear to me what she thought of my cancer experience. And, my experience didn’t even rise to the level of a “pimple.”

    Now I can’t say her opinion surprised me, because I’ve been plagued with such thoughts myself. Without a tumor and with a Stage 0 cancer diagnosis, I started this journey not even sure I was qualified to call myself a cancer patient. (And that was despite the fact that I heard those three words everyone else has heard, “You have cancer.”) I didn’t know what to call myself. I didn’t know where I fit in. I didn’t seek out help because I wasn’t sure I was entitled to it. I kept thinking I should just be glad I wasn’t given a death sentence and get over it.

    Read more here: http://www.wherewegonow.com/debbies-blog/cancer-survivors-guilt-its-ugly-cousin

    Copyright 123RF Photos, WhereWeGoNow, LLC

    12 Comments
    • DebbieWoodbury's Avatar
      DebbieWoodbury

      It does go both ways because there is always someone worse off, no matter what our situation. If you read my entire article, you know I don't blame the woman who called my cancer less than a "pimple." I know most of us struggle with anger and many other difficult emotions because of this disease. We're all doing the best we can. Thank you for your comment, oceanblue24.

      almost 3 years ago
    • Dianem's Avatar
      Dianem

      I have stage 4 metastatic lung cancer. After 7 months of unsuccessful treatment I was started on a clinical trial which seems to be working. I am feeling better. But there are others who were diagnosed after me who are not doing so well, or have passed. I feel like it's the elephant in the room, that I'm here and they are not. But a good friend told me that God was going to be very annoyed with me if I kept it up. God had given me a gift and I was questioning it. That resonated with me and since then I have tried not to feel that guilt and simply accept it as Gods plan, and use my time making others see what a wonderful world this is and how precious every day is. Keep strong and God bless.

      almost 3 years ago
    • DebbieWoodbury's Avatar
      DebbieWoodbury

      I'm so glad you're feeling better and that your friend's words of wisdom resonated with you Dianem. I think acceptance is a powerful way to deal with survivor's guilt and I wish you many, many more precious, wonderful days ahead.

      almost 3 years ago